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ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

Stolen wedding ring, chances of winning in court?

Asked by ANef_is_Enuf (23298 points ) August 3rd, 2010

Someone close to me had her wedding ring stolen and is positive that she knows who took it. She filed a police report, talked to the pawn shops, etc. The police told her that she could press charges against the person she suspects even if she never retrieves the ring.

Can you actually win a case by just saying something to the effect of “I saw this person rifling through my jewelry box the day before the item went missing…” ?

Is it even worth going to court over? (Not that I don’t think she should, because if it were me and I had any chance at all to win, I’d take it to court on principal alone.) What are the odds that she would win?

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17 Answers

Afos22's avatar

That is exactly the point of taking someone to court. You explain your story, show your evidence, and the judge or jury decide who is right.

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

ha, fair enough.

BoBo1946's avatar

My first thought, how do they know who took it?

tedd's avatar

You could take it to court, but its not a terribly solid case. Should the person have been “riffling” through their jewelry box? No obviously not. But without actually witnessing them take it, they’d just be a suspect.

If you want to win that case, the ring needs to turn up.

BoBo1946's avatar

Well, have to have some kind of proof first.

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

Right, there is no proof. I don’t want to say too much online, I was just curious how likely the odds would be in her favor with the info I was able to give.

I didn’t suspect they would be good, but law is not really one of my strengths.

BoBo1946's avatar

well, @TheOnlyNeffie If the item was in a known place, then it would be a theft. If the person has homeowners or renter’s insurance, it would be covered. If they don’t have insurance, they can claim this loss on the income taxes. It comes off the top. A good return can be possible at tax time.

Without any proof, court is out.

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

@BoBo1946 thank you, that was very useful information in and of itself. Much appreciated!! :)

BoBo1946's avatar

@TheOnlyNeffie very welcome my friend!

BoBo1946's avatar

btw Neffie, they should turn this into the police. Most insurance companies require a theft report. Also, will be needed for tax purposes as well as an apprisal of the value.

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

@BoBo1946 they did file a report, immediately. They have been in contact with the police since the day they realised it was missing. I will definitely tell her about the theft report and insurance and whatnot. I’m sure she is heartbroken that she won’t get her actual ring back, sentiment and all, but this at least gives her a chance to recover something. Thanks for all of your help. :)

Afos22's avatar

Good luck finding your ring

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

It’s not my ring, but thanks @Afos22… I hope she gets it back. I have to say this is one of the lowest “friend” on friend crimes that I can imagine.

Afos22's avatar

@TheOnlyNeffie what do you mean about, “the lowest “friend” on friend crimes..”

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

@Afos22 I mean that it is a very horrible thing for a “friend” to do to another friend. To steal something at all is terrible, but something so meaningful is a very low blow. Obviously a wedding ring is worth much more than its monetary value.

BoBo1946's avatar

@TheOnlyNeffie just thinking, they should check all the pawn shops locally! Never know.

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

@BoBo1946 they did that, as well. The police get a record of every person that pawns something, so they went through all of that with the police. The person who she suspects has a long list of pawn records, but nothing has come up recently… yet.

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