Social Question

partyrock's avatar

NSFW Does classical music sound sexually charged to anyone else?

Asked by partyrock (3865 points ) December 28th, 2011

Does anyone else see classical music as being sexual, or sexually charged ? Is it just my perverted mind ? I think most of the classical songs I listen to are very beautiful, mysterious, amazing, but I also think of sex. Could this just mean sex is on my mind ? I feel like it stirs up a lot of passion.Not to say that is what classical music is intended for. Bach, Mozart, Prokofiev, Tchaikovsky, etc.

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25 Answers

marinelife's avatar

Not all of it. For example, Vivaldi’s Four Seasons evokes those very well and nature, but does not make me think of sex.

janbb's avatar

Try Ravel’s Bolero if you want sexy classical music!

Charles's avatar

I listen to classical music about five minutes a year. I get excited every five minutes.

Blackberry's avatar

I can see how one would think that, but that depends on the person. I personally think of being on an adventure in the mountains and forests, lol.

rebbel's avatar

(Classical) music comes in very strong and deep, in the mind and in the heart.
So it can be that it triggers deep emotions and urges and instincts.
Some people can be seen crying when listening to a piece of classical music, so maybe it can (in you) also touch your instinctual urge for sex?

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

I get that, yes. From certain songs. I think that @rebbel really nailed it, for me, in that classical music really evokes a strong emotional response from many people (myself, included.)
I have to be in just the right mood to appreciate it, otherwise I find it leaves me feeling irritable or depressed… sometimes, even angry.
The last few days or so, just happened to be the right mood, because I have been listening to endless replays of Vivaldi and Beethoven, and I think it is relatively easy to see how someone might relate them to sex. They are emotionally moving, intimate, and many pieces are traditionally viewed as romantic. I don’t get that feeling from something like, say, Moonlight Sonata… which is extremely depressing, but sometimes unexpected pieces like Mozart’s Requiem, which is dramatic and intense and varying in tempo, I could see getting flushed over. Is that morbid? lol.

Male's avatar

I think everyone can get emotionally charged by different songs, perhaps yours is classical music…and your emotion is sexual.

partyrock's avatar

@janbb – Bolero’s Ravel is so beautiful, that’s exactly one of the songs I was thinking of. Great music.

partyrock's avatar

@ANef_is_Enuf – I feel the same way. Moonlight Sonata is depressing to me too. I think of a funeral going on. No not morbid lol.

everephebe's avatar

Sure, certain pieces have oomph.

Bellatrix's avatar

Rodrigo’s Concerto de Aranjuez. Phew…. now where did I leave that man….

Some classical music is very, very sexy. Some is not at all. Just like any other music.

flutherother's avatar

Wagner can be very erotic at times.

Bellatrix's avatar

Looks @Flutherother…

gailcalled's avatar

@partyrock @Anef is Enuf

The first movement of the Moonlight is slow but harmonically and melodically complex.

Listen to the other two movements. It is not a Johnny-one-note sonata..

The second moment is lyrical and lilting.

And no one can call the third movement extremely depressing. It has the dramatic dynamics that Beethoven is known for and requires the skill of a pyrotechnican. Listen to Murray Perahia play it “here”: The piano will leap out of the screen.

Would I like this guy’s hands on my body? You betcha.

Now, Ravel’s Bolero is a “Johnny-one-note” piece, of limited technique and musical interest.

Most of the traditional operas of the Western repertoire have passionate love stories and music to reflect it. “Carmen, ” “La Traviata, “La Bohéme,” “Tosca,” “Lucia di Lammermoor,” “Faust,” “Don Giovanni,” “Tristan und Isolde.”

“Classical music” is a vague term that covers centuries of composers of all ilks, colors, creeds and skills.

gailcalled's avatar

Oops. ’Here’s the link to the third movement of the Moonlight.

mazingerz88's avatar

Wow, been listening to a lot of classical music lately and never did I feel anything sensual. I’m definitely going to pay more attention next time. But what if Ave Maria turns me on?

Bellatrix's avatar

@mazingerz88, if it works for you… go for it :D

If it does though, there was a thread recently about fetishes…

gailcalled's avatar

@mazingerz88: Get thee to a nunnery and become a bride of Christ.

Have you listened to the love arias from the operas? They are sensual.

Lovers sell their souls to the devil, get stabbed outside bull fighting arenas, plunge to their deaths from high towers, take poison, get dragged to hell, die of consumption…it’s all in the name of sex.

mazingerz88's avatar

@gailcalled Hmm, yes. Arias from Tosca, Carmen and Aida? Oh, Madam Butterfly!

gailcalled's avatar

@mazingerz88: I can’t think of a western opera (other than the contemporary ones) that don’t have sex, drugs and their version of rock and roll as the main draw (If you consider alcohol as a drug of choice).

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

I came across a study that tied music to a very emotional part of our us. It makes sense sex and music would have a link.

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

Our wasn’t supposed to be in there.

gailcalled's avatar

Pity. I liked the sound of “our us.” It almost makes sense.

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

@gailcalled It was our souls, or us. I couldn’t decide which.

sleepdoc's avatar

One of the things which is found more frequently in classical music than in what we listen to in terms of popular music is tension and release. Very often the music will build tension with the cord structure or phrasing and then release this later. Most classical pieces will repeat this pattern over and over and then have a bigger creation of tension which lasts longer and releases in a more profound manner. Maybe that is part of why it seems sexual.

A really good example of the is the piece “Moldau”.

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