General Question

nmguy's avatar

How do I rid myself of Dr. Oz and his green coffee beans?

Asked by nmguy (479 points ) February 14th, 2013

About two months ago, I began receiving unsolicited e-mail from friends that contained a promotion for Dr.Oz who was encouraging people to buy green coffee beans. Purportedly, the beans were being sold in a store in the remote New Mexico village where I live. Now, one of my CA friends is getting the same promotional garbage from me.

Can anyone tell me how to rid myself of this nonsensical spam?

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17 Answers

Tropical_Willie's avatar

No, but when you find out, give me a holler. Similar problems.

JLeslie's avatar

Report it to Dr. Oz via his website. He has gone on record saying he does not support his photo, quotes, or any endorsements of particular brands and products. He has law suits against companies regarding this, and he wants people to alert them when this is going on.

trailsillustrated's avatar

its a bug in your email. Have your computer swept for viruses. Maybe apologise to the friend that got the chain from you. Don’t open shite like this. Good luck I’ve dealt with it too.

muhammajelly's avatar

@nmguy I am sure you don’t want to hear this but if you use Microsoft Windows you cannot get rid of Dr. Oz and friends. You can only address each problem as it comes up. Next time they might record your keystrokes and empty your bank account or hijack your accounts. Your identity might be stolen. Something more embarrassing than advertisements for green coffee beans might come from you to your friends. The only real answer is to switch to an operating system which isn’t plagued by viruses and security holes. No operating system is perfect but Windows is certainly THE WORST in this regard.

nmguy's avatar

I’ve got a Mac with OS X 10.8.2.

muhammajelly's avatar

@nmguy Then the coffee beans ***MAY*** be your fault (through gullibility). In the future you have to make sure everything is properly updated and that you don’t download-and-run anything sent to you over e-mail unless you KNOW it is safe. This includes executable content such as .PDF files which people do not normally consider as applications.

Also, are you sure the e-mails are coming from your computer? How do you know someone else isn’t signing into your online mail account because you used the same password in on multiple sites?

dabbler's avatar

You can probably put a filter in your email program to drop those messages straight to trash.

Rarebear's avatar

I’ll just chalk this one up in one of my very long list on why to despise Dr. Oz.

nmguy's avatar

Muhammajelly, the guy who has received the Dr. Oz crap says it is from me, because he sees my name on the From line. Next time I get it, I’ll identify it as spam on my e-mail program and see if that helps. I should have known better than to open files, even though they were supposedly from friends. Thanks for you assistance.

burntbonez's avatar

Change your email password right away. Change it again regularly. Keep changing your other passwords, as well.

You should also filter incoming mail to get rid of mail from certain addresses or about certain subjects that you aren’t interested in.

Brian1946's avatar

I began receiving unsolicited e-mail from friends….

Is the email address of the sender exactly the same as your friend’s? It might be different, even if the sender is using your friend’s name.

If it’s a different address, then you should be able block it.

If it’s the exact same address, then it could be a case of email spoofing:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Email_spoofing

http://www.pcworld.com/article/253305/minimize_your_exposure_to_email_spoofing.html

If your email service has the option, you should be able to create a filter, to send all incoming email with “Dr Oz” in the subject line, to your trash folder.

ragingloli's avatar

Congratulations.
Either your email account has been hijacked, or you caught a nasty trojan that made your computer part of a botnet to send spam to people in your contact list.
You need to do a full virus scan as well as change your email-account’s password immediately.

lillycoyote's avatar

I don’t know if it could be this simple but have you checked at the bottom, at the end of the emails you’re getting from these people, for an “unsubscribe” option? Sometimes it is that easy and simple.

The unsubscribe option is usually at the very bottom, in fine print.

Just a thought.

ragingloli's avatar

@lillycoyote
Never, never use such an “unsubscribe” button. All it will do is inform the spammer that your account is live and ready to be spammed to oblivion.

ETpro's avatar

I just got an email today purporting to be from one of the Fluther Members. It had a link that lead to a site with that infuriating onBeforeUnload event to open a popup asking “Are you sure you want to leave this page?” Clicking Yes or No is actually agreeing to install the unwanted malware on your system. Once there, it will go to work mailing links to everyone in your email list inviting them to get infected too.

So first, NEVER click any button offered after such a popup opens. Instead use the task manager to close the entire browser the window is in. Most such exploits will only reopen after the first use of task manager to shut down the browser. The second time you open it, Firefox tries to open its default window only. But this hacker has figured out a way to defeat that. I had to buy a copy of Ccleaner and clean up Cache before I could get rid of the malware page.

j0hnc's avatar

On Friday, May 25, 2013, my wife received a record 631 Dr. OZ from 630 different domains! I have received upward to 320 or so in just one day! She averages over 450 daily! Currently my wife and I run 5 spam filters – all are “trained” to catch as many “wildcards” from Dr. Oz (currently there are over 4000 ways of of masking the name) and, according to Computer World, Dr. Oz’s spams total over 3 million 400 thousand possible domain maskings, and growing DAILY. I thought it would be fun to check our spam filters today and the finding are herein reported. Dr. Oz’s website is not the culprit. The culprit(s) are said to reside in Scandinavia and Denmark.

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