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Judi's avatar

What are the chances that congress will actually get to vote on the deal the Senate made today to reopen the government and raise the debt ceiling?

Asked by Judi (37660 points ) October 16th, 2013

Today is October 16, 2013 for the historical purpose of this discussion.
I don’t have TV. Can anyone tell me what concessions were made in the deal? Has Bohener responded at all?

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26 Answers

Pachy's avatar

At this moment it looks pretty good a deal (a lousy one) will be approved unless the House scuttles it.

Judi's avatar

What is lousy about it? I can’t find any details on the deal.

Judi's avatar

When even Pat Robertson is telling the Republicans it’s time to give up…..

Pachy's avatar

What’s lousy is that it’s only good till January, then we have to go through this all over again.

Judi's avatar

Got it.

Pachy's avatar

Sorry, gave you the wrong link. Check this one.

zenvelo's avatar

They’re making the House vote first, so that the Senate can then just vote to approve what gets passed.

But I think the chances at passing are about 55% right now, because Boehner has no control over his own party.

He’s going to have to throw a bone to the non Tea Party Reps to vote with the Dems to pass it. Or he’ll cave and not get it done. He couldn’t get the votes together yesterday, and there are a lot of Tea Party Reps that are saying it is no big deal if we default.

glacial's avatar

I don’t see how saying “we can agree to pay our debts for another two months” is a win. I would not be surprised if this deal, if they can even make it, results in another credit downgrade. From the outside, it seems plain that the US does not feel (or perhaps doesn’t understand) that paying its bills is a priority.

Judi's avatar

@Pachyderm_In_The_Room , thanks for the link. I still wonder if Bohner will even let it vote.

ETpro's avatar

@zenvelo Actually, Boehner doesn’t have to pay any attention to the Tea Party. As Speaker, he has the authority to bring a bill to the floor for a vote. The Tea Party caucus is a minority of a minority. Boehner is just kowtowing to them because he cares more about his piteous job than he does the nation he supposedly represents. He fears he’ll lose his seat to a primary challenge from the far right unless he gives in to all Tea Party demands.

Judi's avatar

Maybe it’s time for Bohener to retire anyway.
If he had allowed a vote 2 weeks ago he may have received a Profile in Courage award. Now he’s just a weasel.

Jeruba's avatar

He must be one of the most uncomfortable people in the U.S. at the moment. Whatever my headaches, I’m thankful I don’t have his.

YARNLADY's avatar

Every little bit helps. It’s anybody’s guess what will happen next.

zenvelo's avatar

@ETpro I know that but without the Tea Party he needs some Republicans who are brave enough to also stand up to the Tea Party threat.

And only Eric Cantor can bring a funding bill to a vote, they changed the rules last week that only the Majority Leader can bring it to a vote.

YARNLADY's avatar

I’m pretty sure the accountants and lawyers for the people in congress are frantically calling their clients with warnings of what they are about to do to themselves.

bolwerk's avatar

It will probably pass at this point. The orange lizard has virtually unilateral authority to bring it up for a vote, and almost anything that doesn’t give the Democrats too many concessions was going to pass all along. He says he’ll put whatever the Senate passes to the floor.

It looks like the only major policy concession Democrats made was to require some kind of income verification for those who receive Affordable Care Act subsidies, but I didn’t catch the details on that.

Judi's avatar

I’m gleaning from articles on the Internet that They are going to allow a vote. Anyone with a TV know when the vote will take place?

glacial's avatar

@bolwerk “It looks like the only major policy concession Democrats made was to require some kind of income verification for those who receive Affordable Care Act subsidies”

So… they’re growing government a little more. Clear win, then.
Y’all crack me up.

YARNLADY's avatar

Go to your Yahoo or Google news page, they are live streaming.

ETpro's avatar

@bolwerk This was actually a bitter pill for progressive Democrats to support. It freezes spending at sequester levels, something that was supposed to be so painful neither party would endorse it. But it’s a hell of a lot better than the US declaring bankruptcy when we aren’t broke.

Pandora's avatar

It’s over for now till Feb. 7th I believe.

ETpro's avatar

Next shutdown is planned for January 15th. Congress can’t renege on paying our bills again till Feb. 7th. Expect a repeat, as the Tea Party sees this exercise that just ended as a great victory for them.

bolwerk's avatar

@ETpro: It was the expected continuation of the status quo.

@glacial: did you sleep through the Bush years? Since when have Republikans minded an over-extended, intrusive government anyway?

Judi's avatar

@bolwerk, republicans font mind as long as they’re in charge.

BhacSsylan's avatar

Well, it also changes nearly nothing. The original outline requires checking a person’s given income against the IRS numbers, and if that isn’t right employer and Equifax numbers. If it’s still not right they have to explain what’s going on directly to the IRS. The new deal requires Sibelius and Daniel Levinson (Inspector General of the HHS) to report to congress on the provisions. That’s it. They stuck a summons for Sibelius and Levinson in the bill and called it ‘income verification’.

From the bill (pages 23–24), the first section ( SEC. 1001. (a)) basically says “The director of HHS shall make sure those eligible are actually eligible, in accordance with that law’. Which is, uh, what the law already states. Then it’s just:

“Not later than January 1, 2014, the Secretary shall submit a report to the Congress that details the procedures employed by American Health Benefit Exchanges to verify eligibility for credits and cost-sharing reductions described in subsection (a).”

and

“Not later than July 1, 2014, the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services shall submit to the Congress a report regarding the effectiveness of the procedures and safeguards provided under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act for preventing the submission of inaccurate or fraudulent information by applicants for enrollment in a qualified health plan offered through an American Health Benefit Exchange.”

That’s it.

ETpro's avatar

@BhacSsylan All smoke and mirrors. Oh and chest beating. “What a good old boy am I!”

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