General Question

blastfamy's avatar

Can anyone explain to me how Texas is not un-American?

Asked by blastfamy (2149 points ) August 9th, 2008

I know that the collective (in general) is not all from the US, but at the same time, I’m willing to bet that many are.

Texas identifies itself as “the Lone Star State.” Their flag depicts a single star on its blue field similar to how the American flag has 50 stars.

Given that the star imagery is intended to relate to the number of states in the union, how is showing what amounts to a mockup of the American flag with one star not saying that ‘we are independent’ from the rest of the country?

Am I missing something, or is the notion of the “Lone Star State” completely unpatriotic?

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

18 Answers

XCNuse's avatar

here, found this for ya:


A single star was part of the Long Expedition (1819), Austin Colony (1821) and several flags of the early Republic of Texas. Some say that the star represented the wish of many Texans to achieve statehood in the United States. Others say it originally represented Texas as the lone state of Mexico which was attempting to uphold its rights under the Mexican Constitution of 1824. At least one “lone star” flag was flown during the Battle of Concepcion and the Siege of Bexar (1835). Joanna Troutman’s flag with a single blue star was raised over Velasco on January 8, 1836. Another flag with a single star was raised at the Alamo (1836) according to a journal entry by David Crockett. One carried by General Sam Houston’s Texian army (which defeated Mexican General Santa Anna at the Battle of San Jacinto ) may have been captured and taken to Mexico. Another “lone star” flag, similar to the current one but with the red stripe above the white, was also captured the following year (1837) and returned to Mexico. The “David G. Burnet” flag, of “an azure ground” (blue background) “with a large golden star central” was adopted by the Congress of the Republic of Texas in December of 1836. It continued in use as a battle flag after being superseded in January of 1839. The 1839 design has been used to symbolize the Republic and the “Lone Star State” ever since.
source: http://www.main.org/boyscout/texas.htm

La_chica_gomela's avatar

It’s not that Texans think that they’re not part of the U.S., they just see themselves as special. A lot of people have pride in their their country, their state, and their town, hence regional sports teams. Every state has its own heritage, it just so happens that Texas’s heritage includes being its own country at one time, and many Texans take pride in that. I’m not Texan, and I don’t see anything wrong or unpatriotic about that.

PupnTaco's avatar

A double negative (“is not un-American”) equals a positive (“is American”).

I lived there briefly as a child – I don’t have a problem with Texans being proud of their flat, ugly, ignorant state (excepting Austin).

j/k~

thetmle's avatar

I wan born and raised in San Antonio and it’s anything but flat and ugly. The hot humid summers, however, do make me wish I lived somewhere else.

PupnTaco's avatar

San Antonio was where the giant locust-grasshopper thing traumatized me as I hid under the redwood patio chair. I’ll never forgive that place.

Randy's avatar

I just took my first trip to Texas. I went to San Antonio and had a blast.

Sueanne_Tremendous's avatar

There is nothing un-American about Texas that I can tell. I’ve spent 10 of the last 15 days there and to me it screams America. They have the same problems as any other state in the Union. They have great cities like Dallas, Austin and San Antonio (and countless others) and they have great regional food and drink like Tex-Mex, authentic Mexican, pit Bar-b-que and some of the finest Margaritas I’ve ever had. I never heard one disparaging remark about me being a Yankee and they are all hepped up about Brett Favre. Yep. True Americans. Hot Americans, to be sure (105F one day….whew).

Poser's avatar

Having grown up in Texas, in a very patriotic family, I’ve never considered Texas or its flag to be anything but patriotic. Texans are a bit more proud of their heritage than the average American, but not un-Americanly so. In fact, I’d consider Texans to be rather more patriotic than the average American—we have two countries of which to be proud.

In fact, when I brought my girlfriend home to visit, I derived great pleasure in explaining (when she asked) why the Texas flag was flown at the same level as the American flag.

wundayatta's avatar

I can’t tell you how Texas is not un-American. It has visited some great traumas on the rest of the nation. They say everything is bigger in Texas, as if that is something to recommend it. They exploit the earth, and think it is a wonderful thing. They believe in complete individual liberty, as if each individual’s life has no impact on anyone else. They visit leaders who believe in gutting our social responsibility system on the rest of the nation.

As far as I can tell, we never should have one that war. I wish Texas had gone with Mexico, not us.

There are a few good things about Texas: Molly Ivins, North by Northwest, San Antonio. Or so I hear. The one thing I know is good is the Gaudalupe Mountains.

breedmitch's avatar

@daloon: Guadalupe. And I’m pretty sure Hitchcock never filmed in Tejas, but I did love Ms. Ivins. Rest in Peace.

@blastfamy: Someone should have warned you; there’s an extremely large Texas representation here on Fluther. As to the flag, I think you’re overthinking it.

jasonjackson's avatar

@daloon: Don’t forget Austin! :)

wundayatta's avatar

Oops. Shows you what I know. I meant Austin. Never been there. Hear lots of good things about it. Wish it weren’t in Texas.

I hope you know that my region bashing is meant tongue-in-cheek. I could bash any region of the country, just for fun. But in the end, I take individuals as they are, not as I think they ought to be, based on where they come from.

aisyna's avatar

I LOVE texas and i dont think our flag is un patriotic, if it was a confederate flag or similar to the confederate flag then i would agree.
@daloon- havent you ever heard the saying “Dont mess with Texas”

jasonjackson's avatar

@daloon: Actually, I’m from Denver. Out here, Texas-bashing is a way of life. ;-)

aisyna's avatar

Why do pepole hate Texas…..this makes me sad :(

wundayatta's avatar

Honestly? I think it started with the Dallas Cowboys back in the 70s. They won too much. They had the hubris to call themselves America’s Team. Then later, a couple of Presidents who I think have done this country horrendous damage hailed from that state. I spent a night in a Texas suburb, and it was too hot to live in without air conditioning. I also passed through Midland Texas.

I don’t know. Of all those things, I think it’s the attitude of Texans that is most off-putting. I was raised to appreciate humility. No one brags in Massachusetts. It just isn’t done. A state where the culture actually encourages bragging? It’s a hard place to like for me. Especially when that attitude has gotten us into wars that sap this nation’s vitality.

I’m sure there are perfectly nice people in Texas. I’ve met a few who had the wisdom to move north. And I don’t hold individual Texans responsible for what the Bushes did. Although I do hold you responsible for electing one as Governor, and then “gifting” him to the rest of the nation. Of course, the rest of the country couldn’t see through his glamour, and elected him not once, but twice. Or maybe once, depending on what the Supreme Court decision covered over.

But I’m just messing around. Texas is my favorite target. Don’t take me too seriously.

aisyna's avatar

We are just proud of Texans, and thats good you should be proud of where your from,

NVOldGuy's avatar

I think people don’t like Texas because Texas can have a navy and their flag represents more than any other state. What’s more American than having a navy all your own?

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.

This question is in the General Section. Responses must be helpful and on-topic.

Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther