General Question

flo's avatar

Is there anything the saying "Nip it in the Bud" doesn't apply to?

Asked by flo (11118points) May 15th, 2018

Does it apply to any area of life?

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

19 Answers

SQUEEKY2's avatar

Sure recognize a bad habit early and take the steps to correct it before it ruins your life.

What it doesn’t apply to is oral sex.

Dutchess_III's avatar

…The mail?

janbb's avatar

An orgasm

zenvelo's avatar

A variant of @janbb‘s answer: giving someone a hand job. Ouch!

Patty_Melt's avatar

Nipples in the bum, whaaaaaa?

Demosthenes's avatar

I used to think the saying was “nip it in the butt”.

zenvelo's avatar

Seriously, there are a lot of things to which the phrase should not apply. Any attempt at taking a risk that might expand one’s horizons should not be nipped in the bud, but encouraged.

A budding romance, a budding business idea, a budding insight, all should be encouraged to blossom.

snowberry's avatar

A wedding.
A 6 course dinner.
Learning a foreign language.
Taking a bath.
A race.

Nip those suckers in the bud!

LadyMarissa's avatar

If someone I loved told me they loved me, I’d not follow it with “Nip it in the bud”!!!

flo's avatar

It seems to me “Nip it in the Bud” always about something bad, from bad personal habits all the way to (a country aquiring nuclear weapon, although some people might debate that).

Dutchess_III's avatar

I don’t think it applies to chocolate milk.

Dutchess_III's avatar

It’s about stopping something before it gets too big, or out of control @flo.

flo's avatar

@snowberry Please explain, Is it a joke? I can see the first 2 not being necessary.

snowberry's avatar

@flo No, not a joke.. Here’s the history of the saying. https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/256600.html
This phrase derives from the de-budding of plants. The earlier form of the phrase was ‘nip in the bloom’ and this is cited in Henry Chettle’s romance Piers Plainnes Seaven Yeres Prentiship, 1595:

A version of the current ‘bud’ version of the phrase first appears in 1607, in Beaumont and Fletcher’s comedy of manners Woman Hater (a title that they would probably have difficulty convincing a publishing house to use today):
“Yet I can frowne and nip a passion Euen in the bud.”

flo's avatar

Why do you want people not to learn a foreign language? @snowberry

Dutchess_III's avatar

What on earth makes you think @snowberry doesn’t want people to learn a foreign language?

snowberry's avatar

@flo That’s nuts! What are you talking about? I think the more languages a person knows, the better!

I was answering YOUR question. If I nipped learning a language in the bud, I’d not learn it.

flo's avatar

Of course, that makes perfect sense.

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