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spittingamethyst's avatar

Does the heartburn I'm having sound normal to you?

Asked by spittingamethyst (246 points ) September 16th, 2011

I’m a 15 year old. I rarely get heartburn. It isn’t too uncommon for me to feel like my stomach is acid-y. But I normally experience heartburn when I’m stressed or anxious, when the weather changes quickly, or when I have a really bad cold. Sometimes I’ll get it when I’m on my period, which is also when my anxiety acts up. And when I do get it, it occurs while I’m eating and then leaves minutes later. I’m going to go to the doctors on Monday. I was just kind of wondering if this is something that’s common or if it was unusual.

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24 Answers

dreamwolf's avatar

Touch the center 4–5 inches above your belly button. Push down, (gently) if it is tender it is indeed heartburn, because that is near where the esophagus is located, and its probably inflamed/irritated (typical). Try calming it down with a banana or gingerale.

HungryGuy's avatar

It’s not common in someone so young, but it happens. Your doctor will tell you not to eat for a few hours before bed, and to sleep on an incline, and may prescribe meds to treat it as well. Until your doctor appointment, get Tums and take two or three at bedtime.

JLeslie's avatar

Where exactly is the pain?

JLeslie's avatar

@dreamwolf Huh? Your esophagus is your throat down to your stomach (the stomach organ, not the tummy). It is nowhere near your belly button.

spittingamethyst's avatar

Like its kinda hard for me to explain, so I went on webmd and its right on with what I’m experiencing link

gailcalled's avatar

And avoid foods that exacerbate the heartburn;

Common criminals are tomatoes, citrus fruit, hot and spicy foods, chocolate, peppermint, caffeine, alcohol and wolfing your food. Don’t eat huge meals and try not to eat for at least three hours before you lie down or go to bed.

JLeslie's avatar

Are you constipated?

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

How bad is the heartburn? Is it really intense or mild?

JLeslie's avatar

Did you try taking Tums or Maalox? It should help.

spittingamethyst's avatar

I’d say its generally mild most of the time. I haven’t taken anything for it, so that should give you an idea. I usually just try to calm it down with ginger ale or a tiny bit of food or something.

wonderingwhy's avatar

“stomach is acid-y. […]when I’m stressed or anxious, when the weather changes quickly, [...]And when I do get it, it occurs while I’m eating and then leaves minutes later”

That sounds a lot like one of my wife’s aunts, she popped TUMS like candy for a while then finally went to the see a doctor. She was diagnosed with GERD and had a follow-up a procedure (EGD? or EDG?) which confirmed it. (I may have that mixed up perhaps the procedure led to the diagnosis?)

Regardless, the point is once it was confirmed she was given a prescription a list of do’s and don’ts and put on a diet low in acidic foods, alcohol, caffeine, and a handful of other things and is now doing quite well. She was also told to sleep with her head elevated which she’s said made a big difference.

Hmm… They might have also switched a medication she was on prior to the diagnosis, I’m not sure though.

Either way, be certain to do a little research (it seems as you have) and be prepared to take notes, listen carefully and ask plenty of questions especially if you’re not clear about something, while you’re at the doctors, it can only help!

JLeslie's avatar

@wonderingwhy Did they test her for H.Pylori?

wonderingwhy's avatar

@JLeslie My wife says she thinks so. There was a test related to ulcers, she doesn’t remember specifically what was involved, but I suspect that was part of it.

gailcalled's avatar

Stress or tension can cause you to bolt your food, not chew enough, and swallow air, also. Ear smaller portions and eat slowly and don’t eat when your stomach feels as though it is in knots.

wonderingwhy's avatar

@JLeslie a bit of unexpected follow up; my wife texted her aunt and she said no, that was not part of the test. They relied on the EGD, which I’ve now learned stands for Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (sp?), to detect any gastric ulcers.

JLeslie's avatar

@wonderingwhy I was just curious, my knowledge is kind of limited on the topic. I think the bacteria can cause other troubles, not necessarily ulcers. I am going to assume a EGD is an upper GI scope? But, I don’t know for sure. I am very infectious disease oriented, so I am always curious about stuff like that.

wonderingwhy's avatar

@JLeslie happy to oblige when possible. Your curiosity got my wife’s going which I got a kick out of and learned something new. To my limited knowledge, I believe you are correct in your assumption about and EGD being an upper GI scope.

Response moderated (Off-Topic)
Response moderated (Off-Topic)
Adirondackwannabe's avatar

@spittingamethyst I wouldn’t be too worried. Try some tums, but get a physical soon.

Lightlyseared's avatar

EGD is an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (it used to be called gastroscopy but as they also look at the esophagus and duodenum the name was changed to be more descriptive). H pylori is the main cause of ulcers but it can also cause a type of non hodgkins lymphoma called gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). In about 80% of cases gastric MALT can be treated with a short course of antibiotics to treat the H pylori.

cheebdragon's avatar

Sounds like you might have an ulcer…

spittingamethyst's avatar

I’m finally getting rid of this cold and its not nearly as bad as its been thank god :)

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