General Question

zarnold's avatar

Corrupt OS X Leopard installation...

Asked by zarnold (695points) July 7th, 2008

Hey, so I was on my mac and I noticed that no applications would quit…even force quit. I attempted to use the restart and shut down desktop options, but to no avail. I proceeded to press the power button, which worked, but when I restarted I got the dreaded “You need to restart your computer” message at the boot prompt. I’ve tried restarting several times, but I get the same message. Fortunately boot camp still works, but I really need my os x install back (and I have neither tiger nor leopard install discs). I’d be grateful for any help. Thanks!

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14 Answers

PupnTaco's avatar

Without install discs, a fix may be impossible. You’ll need to boot from the install disc & run Disk Utility or take it in to the Apple Store for a fix.

Stocky's avatar

What kind of machine are you on and is it intel or powerpc?
Let me know and I might be able to hook you up with an install disk
i can get you a tiger disk no problem but if you need leopard you will need a dual layer DVD&Burner. (as long as nobody rats me out);)

zarnold's avatar

awesome…I’m running a 3rd gen macbook pro (c2d) with what I believe is (was) OS X 10.4 or whatever the latest iteration was. Thanks so much!

Stocky's avatar

http://thepiratebay.org/tor/3739083/Mac_OSX_10.4.8_Install_Disc_1_for_MacBook_MacBookPro_…

Try this first if you still have trouble I can send you a copy of a disk i have at work tommorow. Either way we should be able to get you up and running somehow

Stocky's avatar

disclaimer: if you really paid for it and really lost it i have no problem helping out a fellow macbook pro user

zarnold's avatar

yeah I have a legit copy, but I was stupid enough to leave all of my important discs/software back at college…

Stocky's avatar

Im happy it worked out for you, Glad to help. Nothing worse then not having your discs in an emergency

Spargett's avatar

@PupnTaco

Apple encourages users NOT to run DiskUtility from the boot disk if possible. The reason being that you’d be repairing permissions based on an outdated set of rules that was written into the disk.

The version of DiskUtility on your machine will have the current and proper permissions set, assuming you’ve updated OS X at least once.

Stocky's avatar

Great point Spargett I caused problems on one of my clients machines doing that. If you repair it the correct way after it fixes it. But it had me scratching my head for a little while

PupnTaco's avatar

@spargett: I was thinking of Disk Utility on the Leopard install disc – running Disk Utility from the Applications folder won’t let you repair the disk on the boot drive, will it?

Spargett's avatar

@PupnTaco

Yes. That is a common misbelief. It can repair permission on the boot drive it is located on. Repairing permissions isn’t as heavy an operation as some people think. It also isn’t as realistically effective at solving many issues either.

PupnTaco's avatar

No, not “repair permissions” – the other function, “repair disk.”

Torment's avatar

You can actually repair your disk without the Install Disc. I stumbled upon this amazing tecnique here (http://kingpin007.blogspot.com/). Check it out, it seriously works.

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