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SQUEEKY2's avatar

Which of the areas would you most likely try and change someone's mind....rest in details?

Asked by SQUEEKY2 (19396points) March 26th, 2017

1. Religion?(To practice, or change faiths, or believe at all)
2.Politics?(To change political sides)
3.Parenting? (To have or not to have children)

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20 Answers

Sneki95's avatar

How about not trying to change others to fit your own beliefs and just let people live?

SQUEEKY2's avatar

Great advice but people are not like that especially the conservative mind set.

Sneki95's avatar

If others do that does not mean you have the right to act the same.

SQUEEKY2's avatar

You automatically think I do this as well,
Isn’t that a bit judgmental?

Dutchess_III's avatar

Politics, because political decisions affect each of us, and to a much bigger degree than religion, although religion can have a huge impact on individual people, especially those who ARE religious.
Politics affect everyone.

Not sure why parenting is on that list. Those are individual decisions that affect no one but the ones who decided to have, or not have, kids.

Sneki95's avatar

@SQUEEKY2 Well, if you didn’t think that, why did you ask? You didn’t ask “Would you try changing people’s minds?” but “Which part of people’s mind would you try to change?” (paraphrased, obviously), which implies that you assume the asked one would try changing people’s minds without a doubt.
You also automatically assumed I was referring to you personally. Interesting, isn’t it?

RedDeerGuy1's avatar

None. As long as if doesn’t hurt me then it would only be for fun.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Oh quit it @Sneki95. Just answer the question or quit following.

canidmajor's avatar

Maybe @Sneki95 is providing a good example of the concept, @Dutchess_III, and you are missing the point.

RedDeerGuy1's avatar

I had a 15 year adventure with a church members and we tried to convert each other. We all moved on at the same time. It was fun.

Dutchess_III's avatar

How am I missing the point? Am I missing the point @SQUEEKY2?

Tropical_Willie's avatar

None

“Never try to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time, and it annoys the pig.”

1973 Robert A Heinlien, Time Enough for Love

SQUEEKY2's avatar

I didn’t really have a point, and I never get what point @canidmajor is trying to make.
People seem very entrenched in those areas ,and just wondering if they would fess up to whatever area they would try and change someones mind on.

canidmajor's avatar

@Sneki95‘s point, @Dutchess_III. I can’t speak for @Sneki95, of course, but it seemed she was giving a good example of people being intractable in an argument. I thought her comments did that in an amusing fashion.
Too subtle for you, maybe?

Dutchess_III's avatar

Well, we usually stick up for what we believe in. I believe the Republicans are so wrong, and I used to be one. But that’s what debates are for, right? I’ve changed my mind about a lot of things through debating.
At the moment @Sneki95 and @canidmajor are trying to change our minds about something, but I’m with you @SQUEEKY2. No idea what they’re talking about.

I still don’t quite get the “to have children or not” on that list. How are people entrenched in that?

SQUEEKY2's avatar

I put Parenting on the list because it is a very strong area for most people , and for the sake of @canidmajor not ripping my head off no one on fluther hounded me on the parenting issue our family and a few friends did for years though.
Saying we just had to type thing.
Conservative people have tried to change my views on politics for years as well.
Religion is a another very hot topic for most people and they try to install their views on any one that will even remotely listen

stanleybmanly's avatar

Interesting 3 topics. They certainly are the big ones when it comes to defining our motivations and attitudes, and all 3 are about the difficulty in “getting it right”. Changing someone’s mind is almost always an exercise in futility. With parenthood as the topic, I’m assuming the question is about whether or not to take on the challenge, given the choice. And of the 3, it is certainly the most perilous and fraught with irreversible consequences beyond the feasible control of those daring the risks. In fact I find it baffling that so many are willing to take on the enormous financial and emotional commitments for the dubious chance of tentative success, while the infinite permutations on measuring such success further cloud a landscape piled high with opportunities for tempting and often unavoidable failures. You can change your mind or “see the light” anywhere along the road with politics or religion. With parenthood, there’s no cancellation of mistakes.

SQUEEKY2's avatar

Super great answer @stanleybmanly ! THANKS!!!

Dutchess_III's avatar

Rick has changed substantially since I met him, religiously and politically. I never actually tried to change him but it happened.
For example, when Obama was up for his first election he was very interested, and we watched Rachel Maddow. Sometimes we’d get into debates. One time one of them started to get a little heated, when I said, “Wait a minute! Are you even registered to vote?”
He was not. Never had been.
“Then why are we even having this discussion? I’m not going to talk politics with you unless you’re registered.”
He got registered, as a democrat. After that election he was tickled and proud of himself!
I firmly believe that without my influence he’d be a hard right wing conservative. He’s easily swayed by emotional arguments, and less concerned with facts. He quickly buys into conspiracy theories, and is easily outraged by things he reads on Facebook. Even if it’s about Trump I have to suggest he take whatever with a grain of salt and do a little research. It pisses him off!

I was not an atheist when I met him, but I wasn’t a fanatic, either. He was completely against cremation. He said something once about “rising to face the east…all of that.” I was like, “Wow. You really believe that??!” But I didn’t say anything.
When my views changed I never discussed them with him, but it slowly dawned on him, and I know it’s set him to pondering.
Once we were visiting his mother’s grave, and he looked out over the acres of headstones, most neglected and forgotten and said, “Wow. All of this land could be used for something else. A park with a small lake or something.”
I just nodded.

I think he thinks more deeply now about different things than he used to.

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