General Question

gorillapaws's avatar

What is the legal term for the principle behind dependant documents in a legal contract?

Asked by gorillapaws (25506points) 1 month ago

If you have a contract called “Document C” that is updating and explicitly referring back to a previously signed contract “Document B” which itself is updating an even earlier contract “Document A,” is there a legal term or principle that states all signed documents are required for the contract to be valid?

In other words, if “Document A” cannot be found (the original or copies) does that potentially invalidate B & C if they’re referencing details from A? Is there a term that describes this kind of dependancy? Thanks!

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

3 Answers

Tropical_Willie's avatar

Doesn’t make sense!

Document “C” is freestanding or should be. Unless you mean revisions of existing contract.

Where “A” was revised to “B” and “C” is a revision of “B” !

You need the entire document package to have a contract . . “A”, “B” and “C” all need to be available and connected..

gorillapaws's avatar

@Tropical_Willie “Document ā€œCā€ is freestanding or should be.”

Document C claims to be freestanding, but makes references to dates from previous documents. In document C it says something like: “see document B for date of contract” and document B says something like: “see document A for date of contract.” If document A cannot be provided, can document C try to enforce a particular date that’s not included anywhere?

Is there a legal term or keyword for chaining of documents and dependencies?

Thanks for taking the time to respond.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

Still doesn’t make sense!

Document “C” can’t be both connected and freestanding. I’ll bet it is non-binding and not written by a lawyer.

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.

This question is in the General Section. Responses must be helpful and on-topic.

Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther