General Question

kevbo's avatar

What's a 5th or 6th grade science fair project that can be done in six days?

Asked by kevbo (25611points) April 6th, 2010 from iPhone

Original idea was to study effect of music on plants grown from seed. Grew the plants, but didn’t play the music. Now what?

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

15 Answers

gemiwing's avatar

Amount of sugar/light ratio to grow rock candy. Bonus- pass out rock candy at the science fair.

earthduzt's avatar

Alot of cornstarch and water does amazing things….You could fill up a kiddy pool with it and slowly put your foot in it and it is a liquid, then walk across it with firm steps and it will turn into a solid.

example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2XQ97XHjVw

http://www.youtube.com/watch#!v=qGqhYUVwPS0&feature=related

this is what you call a non-Newtonian fluid

njnyjobs's avatar

Grow 2 sets of bean plants, one is light deprived (store inside a cabinet or something) and the other out in the open. Track the growth stats on a daily basis. This will show the beneficial effect of sunlight to plant growth, with all other things equal.

earthduzt's avatar

Or…make you own comet if you really want to win :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stdSm6qIJso

Storms's avatar

Use fertilizer and water to make ice at room temperature.

john65pennington's avatar

Volcano. take strips of newspaper, soaked in flour and water and make a volcano. use a paper towel insert(the tube) for the inside of volcano. let dry thoroughly. make volcano on a pience of plywood or suitable portable piece of whatever. on day of show, pour baking powder and vinegar down paper towel insert and watch the lava flow.

Storms's avatar

@earthduzt O, non-newtonian fluids, your behavior is strange to my senses… you rock my world.

lilikoi's avatar

How chemicals can produce electricity

Which metal corrodes fastest (needs 10 days, but you may see corrosion product after 6)

Here’s a better corrosion experiment for next time when you have a few weeks at least.

I’d scrap anything requiring plants to grow.

Any science project done in 6 days is not going to be very meaningful to the student, based on my own experiences. It takes time for interesting things to happen, and even more time to understand why they happened. After initial observations, the kid would probably have further investigative questions that could warrant additional experimentation – that is where science really begins. A 6 day project is like cramming the night before for a test.

autumn43's avatar

Buy six kinds of dish soap and find out which one makes the most suds and which one keeps it suds the longest using various types of “dirt” – food, grease, nothing. Take pictures and attach to bottles of liquid soaps (antibacterial, non-grease, etc) and list what happened when using for cleaning.

msbauer's avatar

here are a bunch of food chemistry experiments: http://www.all-science-fair-projects.com/category39.html. i just browsed them and several seemed like something you could do in just 1 night. plus kids love experimenting with food :)

wilma's avatar

You could make a fruit battery.
Or test which fruit makes the best battery, oranges, lemons, apples?
It doesn’t take much, just the fruit and some zinc coated nails some copper wire and one of those volt meter thingys.

wilma's avatar

Oh and don’t try to make a lemon pie with those lemons. ick!

filmfann's avatar

You have plenty of time to make a Tesla Coil.

CyanoticWasp's avatar

You could call it an experiment in socio-biological science called “No Plant Left Behind”. You’ve started the experiment and run out of money. Call it a temporary success and apply for a government grant for additional funding (and promotion—lots and lots of promotion).

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.

This question is in the General Section. Responses must be helpful and on-topic.

Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther