Social Question

Jude's avatar

Do you know any of these Canadianisms (their meaning) without looking them up?

Asked by Jude (31974 points ) April 10th, 2012

How aboot that.

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

46 Answers

wilma's avatar

I didn’t know three of them, and I don’t know how to spell what I didn’t know.
Invidulate?
postcoat
skoka chair?

Jude's avatar

invigilate
Housecoat
Muskoka Chair

Plucky's avatar

I’m Canadian and I didn’t know what a Muskoka Chair was (I’ve seen them everywhere but didn’t know that’s what they were called).

KateTheGreat's avatar

The way you pronounced “house coat” made me giggle. It sounded like “hooscoot” to me.

wilma's avatar

Oh Housecoat, yes I know that one. The other two I don’t know and would have to look them up.

flutherother's avatar

I’m from Scotland and I knew most of the words at the start as they are words we use here but after ‘house coat’ it began to sound like another language. Was that ‘postal code’? We say postcode over here.

Jude's avatar

Postal code.

Americans call it zip code.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Damn it! I just X’d out and I have to start all over!
Back bacon…meat off the back of a hog?
Icing sugar….sugar icing? Wait…powdered sugar.
Processed cheese….American Cheese
Brown bread, made from either brown cows or unbleached flour
Homo milk…Homogenized milk
Invigilate…to shake up?
Chesterfield…cigarettes?
Eves trough (some of these I’m not sure I’m hearing clearly)....gutter?
Sorbet….isn’t that some sort of French dessert involving ice cream?
Helps coats? (don’t think I understood)
Trac cabs…?
Micoca chair?
Hoose a coose? Maybe…you should spell them for us…they all sound French anyway.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Yes…give us a spelled list!

lillycoyote's avatar

The only one I know for sure is Nanaimo bar and… serviette… is that a napkin? That’s what it is in French so I’m guessing on that one.

Wonderful to hear your voice though, @Jude, it makes you seem real, like the Velveteen Rabbit. You’ve come to life now. :-)

Dutchess_III's avatar

No! I’m serious! I need to see them spelled! (BTW…what was my grade for as far as I got?)

Jude's avatar

back bacon
icing sugar
processed cheese
brown bread
homo milk
invigilate
chesterfield
eavestrough
serviette
housecoat
track pants
Muskoka chair
postal code
poutine
Nanaimo bar
Tourtière
toque
toonie
and a mountie

Jude's avatar

You got back bacon, icing sugar, homo milk, eavestrough, and processed cheese right.

Dutchess_III's avatar

back bacon—Meat off the back of a hog.
icing sugar—Powdered Sugar ?
processed cheese—‘Merican cheese?
brown bread—Bread with with brown eggs and unbleached flour
homo milk—homogenized milk.
invigilate—to shake up??
chesterfield—a cigarette?
eavestrough—gutter?
serviette—French for a little serving thinger.
housecoat—bathrobe
track pants—sweatpants
Muskoka chair—A chair usually found in Muskogee, Oklahoma (“Oh, I’m proud to be an Okie from Muskogee!)
postal code—sip code
poutine—A very, VERY Southern way of saying “Pouting.”
Nanaimo bar—a bar that…is…for…animal nannyies.
Tourtière—A woman’s backside
toque—A hit off of a joint.
toonie—Cartoons? Music?
and a mountie—Po-lice. On horseback. In the mountians.

Dutchess_III's avatar

You have to copy and paste all those and mark them right or wrong! (I’m so tired of being the one on the grading end…somebody needs to grade me!)

Jude's avatar

brown bread = whole wheat bread

Jude's avatar

housecoat = bathrobe

and yes, Mountie is right.

I mentioned others that you got right. The rest, bahahaaha!!!!!!! :)

Dutchess_III's avatar

Wait! “Invigilate” is what we do to people like Frank Zimmerman!

Jude's avatar

Or and trackpants right.

Jude's avatar

We get a lot of our terms from the Brits, it seems.

Jude's avatar

invigilate = supervise students during an exam.

lillycoyote's avatar

Now that you’ve written them out… I know one other, Mountie.

I watched Rocky and Bullwinkle and Dudley Do Right as a kid. Of course I know what a Mountie is. :-)

tranquilsea's avatar

It wouldn’t be fair for me to participate as I AM CANADIAN sorry I couldn’t help it

Bent's avatar

A lot of these are British as well as Canadian

back bacon – we just call it bacon, but it’s the meaty half of the rasher. The other half is streaky bacon
icing sugar – this is what we call it here too. Its very fine powdered sugar used for making icing
processed cheese – those horrible square slices found on burgers
brown bread – bread thats brown. usually (but not always) wholemeal
homo milk – homogenised, I think this is what we call UHT milk
invigilate – to supervise over something (I think)
chesterfield – a sofa – old fashioned leather type with studs in the back
eavestrough – ??
serviette – napkin
housecoat – dressing gown. We don’t call them housecoats here
track pants – I suppose you’d call them sweat-pants in America? We tend to call them “trackie bottoms”
Muskoka chair – ??
postal code – postcode – your zip code
poutine – chips, cheese and gravy. Dreadful combination but apparently popular in the canteen at work. We just call it “chips cheese & gravy” though. Our chips are your fries.
Nanaimo bar – ??
Tourtière – ??
toque – ??
toonie – ?? Over here, I’d guess at a Newcastle United fan, but that wouldn’t apply to a Canadian, so I don’t know
mountie – Mounted police officer. Everyone knows those. We all watched Due South here too.

Incidentally, the way you Americans write a Canadian accent, with words like “aboot” and “toon” is how a Scottish or Geordie accent is written in Britain. Funny, that.

downtide's avatar

@Bent A Newcastle fan is a Magpie not a Toonie (I know this cos I’m married to one). I also know that a Toonie in Canada is a 2 dollar coin, to go with the Loonies which are the one dollar coins, because they have a picture of a loon on them (a seabird). And I only know that cos I’ve been to Canada.

Symbeline's avatar

I know a few, but I’m surprised at the amount of stuff in there I never heard of. Maybe because I live in a French province, but I spent 12 years in Manitoba, and some of these I never heard of. Maybe some are province specific?

Homo milk. In Québec, our milk comes in bags. Other parts of Canada have them too, but Winnipeg, where I lived before, seems to be denied milk bags. I like milk bags though, they look like pillows. :D

Serviette is the French word for towel, specifically for a bath towel, but you can use the word for other things, like scott towels or tampons.

Track pants, yeah. Postal code, yup. Fuck zip codes. Fuck em!

Poutine and tourtière, the latter being a Québec food, (meat pie) fuckin rock. Toques, yeah. But doesn’t the US have those too? And mounties, yeah. Never actually saw one though, except in festivals and parades and crap.

The rest, never heard of em. Also, people in Scotland say ’‘aboot’’ way better than we do.

Jude's avatar

@Symbeline would love to hear you do the accent challenge. Do you have a French accent?

Kayak8's avatar

My family eats tourtière every Christmas Eve! They actually say many of these same things with similar pronunciation in the northern reaches of Ohio (just across the lake from Canada). For example, they call ‘em Eaves Troughs in Toledo

FutureMemory's avatar

I figured Homo Milk had to mean Homogenized, and I’ve heard British people refer to sweat pants as Track pants or “Trackies” (I think).

The rest I had no idea about.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Oh, I’ll have to remember that one! ” Invigilate” It’ll be our Word of the Week!

Symbeline's avatar

@Jude Yeah, from France. Can you swear on that site? Rattling off a bunch of Québec cussing might be pretty cool. you know, for learning purposes

@FutureMemory I thought they called that kind of stuff shellsuits in the UK? But that would be for entire suits, rather than just pants, I guess…

Jude's avatar

@Symbeline Oh, you can swear. I say go for it. ;)

FutureMemory's avatar

@Symbeline They might refer to them as shellsuits…I really don’t know, to be honest. I’m only going by what I’ve heard in movies and a few TV shows. I don’t know any British people in real life.

WillWorkForChocolate's avatar

back bacon- it’s a painful process, you cannibal
icing sugar-sugar icing
processed cheese- fake cheese
brown bread- bread that’s brown
homo milk- gay milk
invigilate- you really don’t wanna know
chesterfield- a city far, far away
eavestrough- You spelled it wrong, it’s actually “Eve’s trough”, for her horses
serviette- a miniature servant
housecoat- outdoor apparel that you wear indoors
track pants- the cops use them to track your location
Muskoka chair- a chair built in Muskogee, Oklahoma
postal code- the emergency code used for identifying insane people
poutine- slang for poon tang
Nanaimo bar- the place where Nanaimos pick up women
Tourtière- a french torte made from turtles
toque- to smoke a joint
toonie- nothin’ better than Saturday morning cartoonies
and a mountie- what my husband does to me at night

Jude's avatar

Ahahahaa!!!!

Jude's avatar

“nd a mountie- what my husband does to me at night”

Jiddy-up. ;)

Plucky's avatar

I’m surprised how many of these words our American neighbours do not know. Some of the answers are just hilarious :)

SmashTheState's avatar

Just a quick note that real tourtiere is made with pigeon, something of which few people outside of Quebec and under the age of 60 are aware. I’d also add another word to the list: pete de soeur. Literally translated, it means: “nun’s fart.”

downtide's avatar

@FutureMemory shell suits were a particular type of track suit that went out of fashion about two decades ago. They were the subject of much ridicule, on account of being completely butt-ugly.

Jude's avatar

Some random person sent me a voice message about Canadianisms. Haha.

Jude's avatar

via audioboo, I mean.

amujinx's avatar

I didn’t see anyone answer toque correctly, so I’ll say that it is a knitted winter hat. All the other one’s I know have already been answered. Honestly, I should probably know more since I can see Canada from my street.

I can pick out a Canadian from how they say processed and sorry though. There’s a few other words that I can use to pick them out too, but those are by far the easiest.

Plucky's avatar

@amujinx We say sorry differently? How do Americans say sorry?

amujinx's avatar

@Plucky At least where I live, we say sorry with an a sound instead of an o sound, while Canadians pronounce it correctly. The same goes for processed.

Plucky's avatar

Oh, like sah-rry. Yeah, I say soh-rry and proh-cessed.

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