General Question

elbanditoroso's avatar

Do we need to restrict US military veterans from flying on passenger aircraft?

Asked by elbanditoroso (20862points) 1 week ago

Yes, I am going to extremes here.

The guy who shot and killed those people in Florida yesterday is a US military veteran. He had packed his firearm, retrieved it from baggage claim, loaded it, and came out shooting.

Following Trump’s “ban all muslims because a few of them do bad things” philosophy, wouldn’t in also follow that Iraq war veterans should be banned from flying because one of them shot and killed people?

[No, don’t take this seriously. I’m trying to point out the ridiculousness of the anti-muslim hysteria.]

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39 Answers

zenvelo's avatar

No. But we do need to restrict access to guns.

He went into the FBI spouting crazy stuff. First thing that should have happened is take away all access to guns.

ragingloli's avatar

I am going to take this seriously, and I agree.
I think that anyone who decides that s/he is going to kill people for money, which is what a non-drafted soldier is, s/he can not be trusted to walk among the general population. Once a soldier’s “service” ends, s/he needs to go to prison permanently, just like any other dog bred for dog fighting.

BellaB's avatar

It’s disturbing how little Canada and the US seem to care for their veterans and their mental health needs. 15 – 20 years ago, mental health professionals were warning about the much more serious problems they were seeing relative to the changes in the type of warfare people were participating in. What did the vets get? cutbacks. It’s truly disgusting.

ragingloli's avatar

@BellaB
They chose their fate when they picked their line of work.

Strauss's avatar

Don’t get me started on a rant about Veterans benefits!

flutherother's avatar

Maybe airport security needs looked at. It seems ridiculous that tubes of toothpaste and bottles of water are confiscated yet putting guns and ammunition in your checked luggage is fine.

BellaB's avatar

I’d be pleasantly surprised if anything was done about guns/gun handling/gun care in the US as a result of any event like this.

The US is about 40 years behind Holland and Israel (two simple examples) on security. Don’t see them catching up anytime soon.

Cruiser's avatar

No…we need to bitch slap people in charge who cross paths with these psychopaths and dismiss them as nothing to be concerned about. This crazy presented himself to an FBI office who did take him to a local hospital who then wrote him off as someone who just needed a hug. We need a much more comprehensive approach to mental health concerns if these events are to be avoided. Very angry about this

JLeslie's avatar

No. We need to be better about dealing with the distress some of our soldiers experience. The psychiatrist who did a mass shooting at Fort Hood, he had asked to be transferred. He was Arab, Muslim, and couldn’t handle treating soldiers coming back from the Middle East with combat stories. The army should have taken him seriously. He was at a breaking point. This guy at Ft. Laud airport from what I understand had some sort of psych treatment previously, I don’t know the details of it. Two weeks ago at the VA hospital in my town a veteran held a doctor at gun point (semi automatic rifle I think) demanding someone take him seriously or help him or something.

@ragingloli I know two people personally who joined the army a couple years after 9/11. America was already in Iraq army that point, as you know, and when I asked them, “aren’t you nervous about the war?” One said that the recruiter told her she will be able to do her photography/journalist persists and most likely wouldn’t be sent to the Middle East. The other was excited about being able to live in different places around the world. Needless to say I gave them both blank stares. Some people join up to fight and kill. Some join up for a job. Some join up, because they are clueless what they are really get into and it sounds exciting.

Patty_Melt's avatar

Absolutely!
Veterans should fly free on board military aircraft.

JLeslie's avatar

^^If they are retired they can to some extent. My dad flies free sometimes, it just depends how much time he has and where he wants to go. Once in a while the flight is regular commercial. I think he flew commercial back from Greece. I think Germany recently was a military flight.

rojo's avatar

Yes, but not their guns. Guns fly free.

JLeslie's avatar

The people fly free. Active and Retired military can fly Space A. Sometimes it’s on commercial flights.

gondwanalon's avatar

If you don’t want this question to be taken seriously then it is best asked as a social question.

josie's avatar

In my opinion no.
Plus I take it seriously, your attempt to dissuade me notwithstanding

Lightlyseared's avatar

Let’s be honest who hasn’t had a hellish flight and thought about shooting everyone?

LDRSHIP's avatar

Guess I’m fucked.

@ragingloli Totally agree, can you please put me away for life now?

Seek's avatar

@Lightlyseared – I actually enjoy air travel.

I mean, I’m FLYING. How can anyone be upset when they are FLYING?

kritiper's avatar

Hell no. Everybody needs to carry a gun and be handy with it, and to fully understand the rules of gunplay!!!

Cruiser's avatar

@Seek I would argue that unless you are insulated on both sides by family members…it doesn’t take too many cattle car flights to wish you took the train instead.

Seek's avatar

@kritiper: he who shoots first wins?

rojo's avatar

Who was it said always get off the first shot because it rattles the other guy and gives you time to take aim for your second one.

Patty_Melt's avatar

^^^^ Somebody nearsighted? ^^^^

Espiritus_Corvus's avatar

The three guys who saved a trainload of people from armed terrorists between Belgium and France last year were U.S. military veterans.

kritiper's avatar

@Seek No.
Rule #1. You NEVER pull a gun on someone unless you feel your life is in danger. (You NEVER pull or flash a gun to scare somebody. The other person may assume their life is in danger and they may shoot you.) Draw when you absolutely have to, when you have NO OTHER recourse.
Rule #2 Never shoot to wound, always shoot to kill. (See rule #1)
Rule #3 Be proficient with your gun. Be able to hit what you shoot at, and place your shot where you want the bullet to strike.
Rule #4 If you have to shoot, be cool. Be calm. Be deliberate! (I have little to fear from a person who might shoot at me with a pistol because I have seen too many people who couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn at point-blank range. Police officers included!) And the shorter the gun’s barrel is of the person shooting at you, the less likely they are to hit you. And only idiots or movie stars hold their automatics sideways.

Gunplay is very serious business and not to be taken lightly!!!

cazzie's avatar

@kritiper why is it called ‘play’ then?

kritiper's avatar

@cazzie Because it is a (very deadly) game. You play by the rules or you die. That’s why, back in the “Old West,” people who chose to kill would most likely ambush their opponent.

Espiritus_Corvus's avatar

I once read that the average age of death in the California gold camps was 26 and the usual cause not disease and not hypothermia, it was gun shot wound.

Seek's avatar

@kritiper – if everyone followed those rules there would be no need for anyone to carry a gun at all.

cazzie's avatar

I don’t think playing with guns is any sort of game.

Espiritus_Corvus's avatar

Russian Roulette is a game and that is the game the NRA is playing with us.

kritiper's avatar

@Seek So you see my point!
If a person wants to carry a gun, and means no harm in doing so, then no harm is done. It doesn’t matter if everybody is carrying or no one is carrying. And when everybody carries, everybody will be so careful, polite, and considerate of others.
But when it comes to guns and gun toting nut-jobs, everybody is a player, whether you want to play or not, whether you like it or not! And if I have to play, I want to be able to play as good or better than the other guy, (Or gal.)
It’s just that simple!

Seek's avatar

I dunno, avoiding people who tend to look for reasons to carry a gun has served me well so far.

Strauss's avatar

^^Me too!

cazzie's avatar

@kritiper Sounds like mutually assured asinine behaviour. But US is so fond of arms races. (not so much armed races, though.)

kritiper's avatar

Not carrying is also allowable game play. Maybe you’ll sing a different tune if you ever meet a nut-job who wants to play the serious game.

cazzie's avatar

@kritiper I’m more likely to have my refrigerator fall on me. I still want to have a refrigerator.

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