Social Question

Sueanne_Tremendous's avatar

How about sharing some old, out of use, expressions with me?

Asked by Sueanne_Tremendous (11198 points ) November 8th, 2009

I am watching the Maltese Falcon and I am way digging the old expressions they use like “dingus” for the bird; “shove off” for get lost and “the cooler” for jail. I might just take up using these expressions. Any other you can think of?

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67 Answers

aphilotus's avatar

I’ve always been a fan of “to the tune of” as a descriptor of money spent.

IE, “Just today, the House weighed in on how much it cares about health care in America, to the tune of a trillion dollars”.

I like it a lot, because it makes me think that people spend money like a weird orchestra, or that there are certain purchases that are “harmonic”.

But I am weird, to the tune of “a whole lot of weird.”

PretentiousArtist's avatar

“happy as a clam”

RareDenver's avatar

I still refer to the radio as the wireless

Judi's avatar

“Out of sight!”
“Boss, man!”
“Far Out.”
“Neato!”
“Keen”

nxknxk's avatar

I always liked ‘grody’ to describe something gross or dirty.

berocky1's avatar

“Do me a solid”

gailcalled's avatar

“Your father’s mustache.”

aphilotus's avatar

“Bully” as an affirmation of awesomeness.

“So I hear old Shanksides finally got himself a good woman!”

“BULLY!”

AstroChuck's avatar

This question is the bee’s knees.

EmpressPixie's avatar

Oh my stars and garters!
Heavens to Betsy!
Here’s lookin’ at you, kid.
Boss! (as a way of saying something is good)

edited to add: @Aphi, I always think of that in the phrase, “Well, bully for you.”

dpworkin's avatar

Skedaddle
Shenanigans
23 Skiddoo
Chump
Mickey Finn
Yegg
Tomato
Gams
So’s yer old man!
Blow it out your barracks bag.
The Cat’s Pajamas

PretentiousArtist's avatar

Now you’re on the trolley!

ThePeanutGallery's avatar

I’m stumped, but thanks for the groovy question!

kalafatic's avatar

Wise guy hunh?
The use of “sand” to mean moxie or balls.
I also love the gesture of clasping your hands together and shaking them firmly on one side of your head and then the other to indicate some type of congratulation or self congratulation. I can imagine people cheering Huzzah!

EmpressPixie's avatar

Oh! @kalafatic! I like moxie in general and think it is highly underused!

The cat’s meow.
Tickled pink (possibly a southern thing, but I think only people my grandmother’s age really say it anymore)

laureth's avatar

This post sure has drawn out the peanut gallery, by crackey!

Judi's avatar

@EmpressPixie ; I still say “tickled Pink!” I’m old but not old enough to be your grandma!!

aphilotus's avatar

@PretentiousArtist I like the cut of your jib!

Ivan's avatar

Cool beans.

RareDenver's avatar

Another phrase I often use that is quite dated is “I tell thee” for example:

“By heck it’s nithering outside I tell thee”

EmpressPixie's avatar

@Judi: We all have old-fashioned phrases we like. But now every time I read your posts they’re going to be in my grandmother’s voice.

SuperMouse's avatar

Sit on it!
You’re the cat’s pajamas!

chyna's avatar

Snarfle as in I snarfled the whole bag of chips in one sitting.

Judi's avatar

@EmpressPixie ; I hope your grandmother is a “sweet old lady,” and not a mean grumpy grandma!

Judi's avatar

Remember Gnarly?

trailsillustrated's avatar

bobs your uncle
knarly

faye's avatar

Jumpin’ Jehosaphats!!

EmpressPixie's avatar

Bodacious!
That’s dope!
“Get sloppy” for being all emotional
They’ll “give you the business”
That’s swell!
All that jazz (though, honestly, I still use this)
Golly!
What a goon
Leaping lizards!

Dog's avatar

Jumpin’ crayfish

Boss

Where’s the Beef?

G-men

OreetCocker's avatar

Put t’wood int th’ole:-)

Judi's avatar

Another one I’m guilty of Okey Dokey

faye's avatar

or okaly dokaly meh

SuperMouse's avatar

Well I’ll be a monkey’s uncle
Well cut of my legs and call me Shorty

Trance24's avatar

I say “tuckered out” a lot and apparently this is a result of me residing with my grandparents because no one uses this phrase and my bf often makes fun of me for saying it.

janbb's avatar

@OreetCocker Sounds like you’re a Yorkshireman!

“Ready to roll.”

tinyfaery's avatar

We used to say “scratch” or “moted” when someone was proved wrong or made a mistake.

aprilsimnel's avatar

By Jiminy!
Dad gum
Gee, whillikers!
Swell
Neato
Professor Egghead
I wish my brother George was here… (from Liberace’s TV show in the 50s)
Zip! POW! To the moon, Alice!

nxknxk's avatar

My mother often uses the word ‘song’ to suggest a very low price or amount of money. As in, ‘She sold that house for a song.’ Or, ‘He got that tractor for a song.’

She also says ‘sow your wild oats.’ There are variations on it. I guess it means this: ‘to do wild and foolish things in one’s youth’.

She’s from Texas.

aprilsimnel's avatar

Check out this page (may not be SFW or anyone)! And why was I shocked to see that there was slang for heroin in those days? D’uuuuh.

Beeswax is from the 20s, as in “none of your beeswax!” Also, things could be “the bees’ knees.” And I still say both though I was born 45+ years later.

SuperMouse's avatar

Say goodnight Gracie
Goodnight Mrs. Kalabash wherever you are

6rant6's avatar

Along the lines of Maltese Falcon
Gat, rod, – gun
Moll, skirt, dame – woman
Moola, greenbacks, bread – Money
Copper, flatfoot – Cop

ccrow's avatar

Peachy.

Dog's avatar

@ccrow Love the close up avatar!

Judi's avatar

@ccrow ; that looks a lot like my dog molly!

majorrich's avatar

SMITE! Love that word!

gailcalled's avatar

@Judi: @chyna also has a dog named Molly.

Dog's avatar

Wing Nut

chyna's avatar

@gailcalled @Judi Best name ever for a dog.

chyna's avatar

@Dog What does Wing Nut mean? Perhaps it is a west coast saying that us easterner’s haven’t heard?

gailcalled's avatar

It means that someone has bats in his bellfry.

chyna's avatar

@gailcalled Ah, now that is an expression I know.

filmfann's avatar

“Boarding house reach” refers to reaching across the table for a plate that should have been handed down.
Having a hitch in your get-along is another great one.

Sueanne_Tremendous's avatar

Loved these, you guys! I’m going to make a list (@aprilsimnel: great link to the 30’s list!) and promise to start using some of these.

nxknxk's avatar

@chyna

My corgi is also named Molly. ._.

Dog's avatar

“Egad!”
“A stitch in time saves nine”
“Blast”
“Swell”
“Dandy”
“Your Mother wears army shoes”
“Mad as a hatter”
“Rubber Biscuit”
“Eat my grits”
“That’s Cherry”
“Birds of a feather flock together”
“Jasper”
“Owl Hoot”
“Elevator does not go to the top floor”
“Plum dandy”

(sorry if any of the above have been said- I am on sleep deprivation)

Judi's avatar

He was nice enough but her was Half a bubble off plumb.

majorrich's avatar

Yer mudders callin’

UScitizen's avatar

“Riding the blind” ... It means to ride in the frame beneath a box car. In the blind spot, where the conductor can’t see you while the train is moving.

UScitizen's avatar

I gave him “all nine yards.” Several maybes on where this came from. One popular one is that the .50 caliber machine gun used in US fighter planes from world war two had nine yard ammunition belts.

UScitizen's avatar

He was a “rounder.” Means he’s no good.

6rant6's avatar

“The whole nine yards,” I thought came from cement trucks. The load was measured in (cubic) yards, and a standard truck was nine of ‘em.

laureth's avatar

And I’d heard it meant wearing the 9-yards of Great Kilt like a true Scotsman, and not just the smaller, “wee kilt.” <shrug>

aprilsimnel's avatar

Well, wait, now, I like a wee kilt! On a Scotsman. Easier to remove.

6rant6's avatar

If I’m not mistaken, I believe that “Plum Dandy” has been supplanted by “Plum Diddy”.
I’m just sayin’..

MorenoMelissa1's avatar

I like the catch phase “Cat’s Pajama’s”

gailcalled's avatar

@MorenoMelissa1: MIlo here; I wouldn’t be caught dead in pajamas. I sleep (most of the day) in my luxuriant black and white coat.

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