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lbwhite89's avatar

How do on-campus jobs work?

Asked by lbwhite89 (1208points) December 28th, 2010

I’m transferring to a 4-year university in the Fall of next year and I’ll be a full time student during the day. As a result, I have to quit my day job and find a part-time evening job. I thought all I had to choose from was serving or casheir jobs, but now I’m starting to think about on-campus jobs at the college.

I can’t go to their career center to look into their openings or talk to them until June, so I was hoping someone here has worked on-campus before and could tell me how it works exactly.

1. Do you get paid toward tuition, but not in cash like a work study or is that a totally different thing?

2. About how much do they pay per hour and how many hours do they usually work you?

3. During breaks and holidays when the college is closed, do you just not have any income. How can you afford bills when the college is closed?

I saw on the college website that there are many departments that hire students, so I’m sure everything varies, but any help is appreciated!

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5 Answers

cookieman's avatar

It does indeed vary. A work-study student is different than being employed directly by the school.

Work-study students are paid by the federal government from a fund that is allocated to the school (yearly, quarterly, by semester, etc.). Available work-study hours are portioned out by a school employee (usually in financial aid or student services) to the different departments and offices on campus (there’s usually some system in place that involves paperwork and begging to determine how the hours are allocated).

Once these hours are available, positions are posted and you can apply for them. Work-study pay is between $8 and $12/hr and some schools allow you to apply it directly to school expenses.

You need to re-apply for work-study positions every semester (term, quarter, etc.) and, yes, you are basically unemployed during school breaks.

Jobs posted and paid directly by the school may pay a little more per hour and can run throughout the year – but I have seen those types of jobs turn over ever semester too (just to give others a chance). Of course, if you’re an amazing employee (mature, reliable, etc.) they may want to keep you on.

On campus employment is a great way to be more involved in your school and be there for more than just the classes. It’s convenient too as you’re already there.

Unfortunately, most of these jobs have time limits on them, you’ve always gotta be hustling to get another one, and they pay can be low.

If your tuition and most expenses are covered (by family or loans) and you just need spending and book money, on-campus employment is a good idea.

However, if you need to pay rent and/or your own tuition (and other expenses), you’ll be better off with a job elsewhere.

I did phone work (debt collection) at night and Saturdays while in school. Made good money, worked 30+ hours a week, and attended classes during the day. Worked out well.

Best of luck.

lbwhite89's avatar

@cprevite I have about $550 a month in bills. That’s really all the income I need, as my tuition is paid for by scholarships, grants, and loans. The phone work idea is good, but I think being cussed out on a nightly basis would really get to me. I know how those people are treated.

I’m a great employee and I really want to work somewhere that will look good on my resume, but I don’t want to be struggling to find work every single semester and not having any money during breaks. I need something more stable. That insurance needs to get paid.

Thank you for all of the information, btw.

BarnacleBill's avatar

Most on-campus jobs are considered part of a financial aid package and are limited to 15 hours per week.

littlebeck30's avatar

1. Do you get paid toward tuition, but not in cash like a work study or is that a totally different thing?
On-campus jobs usually pay you through a check or through direct deposit into your account. The amount paid is usually to help with cost of living expenses, at least in my college (Ithaca College)

2. About how much do they pay per hour and how many hours do they usually work you?
Depending on the state in which the college is, they usually pay minimum wage at first and allow promotions to be earned. NY colleges are limited to 20 hours you can work per week. I am not sure about other states, it may be all the same

3. During breaks and holidays when the college is closed, do you just not have any income. How can you afford bills when the college is closed?
When the college is closed, so are the jobs so you better get a winter seasonal job if you want to pay those bills!

fatcats's avatar

I worked on campus for 3 years as that was all I could do as well. Hope my answers help!
1. Do you get paid toward tuition, but not in cash like a work study or is that a totally different thing?

We were paid like any regular job – every 2 weeks, direct deposit into our bank accounts of choice. If you really needed, you could request a hard check. How you choose to use the money is up to you.

2. About how much do they pay per hour and how many hours do they usually work you?

Depending on your experience, you could get paid anything from minimum wage for entry-level to the maximum allowed in the role for say, a receptionist or accounting position, if you have a few years of experience. Working hours varied depending on need and availability – so if you worked the library, you could do maybe 3–4 hours a day (including weekends); if you worked a department office, you could do a few hours in between classes on weekdays only etc.

3. During breaks and holidays when the college is closed, do you just not have any income. How can you afford bills when the college is closed?

There are some departments and buildings that might be open year-round, only closed on select national holidays. Some dorms are open for summer break while the summer semester is in session, so there are jobs available, as well as the departments offering classes, and the library. Some graduate programs run throughout the year, so you could try those departments – like the law library, or master program front desk etc.

Good luck!

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