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Breefield's avatar

What size mattress should I purchase?

Asked by Breefield (2728points) January 5th, 2011

I’m moving into my new apartment sometime this weekend (which kind of stinks because I paid a full month’s rent which started on the 1st, and it’ll be the 9th before I get in there), and I need to buy a mattress. I’ll probably get it from Ikea when I go to get a desk and chair.

The apartment is a studio, I’m estimating about 175 sq/ft on the Upper East Side in NYC. I plan to be working out of the space atleast 6 hours a day, so optimizing space is a priority.
There is a closet, but I don’t have the dimensions yet – I’ve considered purchasing a murphy bed apparatus and then using a standing closet for my clothing, etc.

Basically, if the murphy bed is an option, it will likely only fit a single/twin. I’d like a double, but that will take up more space, and would have to be on the floor.
I’ve also considered options like this, which I owned when living in Idaho. I’m not opposed, but I found couches don’t make the best beds in the long term.

Would you go with a twin or double, given the constraints, or do you have a crafty, space saving idea I should know about?

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29 Answers

MissAnthrope's avatar

Ikea has some decent couch/bed conversion units. The one my ex had was plenty comfortable, kind of a nicely firm (but not too firm) futon feel. When you go, you can kind of test drive the different mattresses and convertible couches, to see if it’d be doable for you.

JLeslie's avatar

A friend of mine had a wall unit Murphy bed in a tiny apartment in Chicago and it was great, but it would be more expensive than what you are talking about. His was either a double or a queen, I think a queen, and had a standard mattress. It basically looked like a platform bed when out, and a normal living room when up.

If you are tall, be wary that the link your provided, when the bed is being used, you will have the arms of the sofa at your head and at your feet, which can be annoying. An extra long twin, is actually longer than a double, which I find more comfortable, because I do not move around much at night, but I hate to feel my sheets too tight around my feet, but I still want them tucked, and I tend to lay down towards the lower part of the bed, way under the covers. But, then someone like my husband, I cannot imagine him sleeping on a twin.

Breefield's avatar

Yeah @JLeslie, I’m 6’3” and can attest that the couch was definitely a tight fit. But I slept on it for maybe 1–2 months while in Boise.

Lightlyseared's avatar

When I was a kid I had a double loft bed (ie a bed on stilts that had a desk underneath). It’s always struck me as theperfect solution for a studio. You get a full size double bed but don’t lose too much space and get plenty of storage too.

Not sure I’d want to have vigorous intercourse on it though

JLeslie's avatar

This is the kind of Murphy bed my friend had, just for the photo, otherwise that link won’t help you I don’t think. On one side of the bed, there was a fold down desk if I remember correctly.

There are probably sofas without arms, which can be a nice modern feel anyway.

Breefield's avatar

@Lightlyseared, your last comment there is definitely a consideration. Not to mention that a “bunk bed” situation may strike a potential partner as a little childish. But if I found the right one at Ikea….just maybe.

Breefield's avatar

@JLeslie, that would be perfect, if I found something affordable.

JLeslie's avatar

A lot of people had loft beds in my dorm at college. Makes sense. You can have your desk under there where the lower ceiling won’t matter much, and in the rest of the open space in your apartment set up a living area.

Lightlyseared's avatar

@Breefield you could always sell it as “playful” as opposed to childish.

JilltheTooth's avatar

Have you considered a Futon? My daughter has one in her apartment. If you buy a quality pad it won’t compress too much, and if you get the right frame you can turn it into a couch for day use.

Lightlyseared's avatar

I had a futon once. It was the most uncomfortable two months of my life.

chyna's avatar

Have you looked at daybeds?

JilltheTooth's avatar

@Lightlyseared : I slept on one for six months during a remodel, it was very comfortable, and my daughter seems to do fine with hers. I think it depends on the pad.

JLeslie's avatar

Lots of people complain about futons being very uncomfortable.

Breefield's avatar

Yeah, and they’re not the prettiest things.

jca's avatar

Costco has what they call a “Euro Lounger” which is about $500 delivered. I got one (from the store) for $400. It is a firm mattress, folds three ways (1. like a couch 2. like a chaise lounge or 3. flat like a bed.

it has a modern look. check it out. www.costco.com. you don’t have to be a member to order online.

jaytkay's avatar

This particular bed does not look very well-built, but the idea is interesting – it pulls up to the ceiling.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/ny/at-europe/at-europe-paris-ceiling-bed-from-espace-loggia-036522

chyna's avatar

@jaytkay That is cool!

Breefield's avatar

I just found Resource Furniture from this video. They’re conveniently located in NYC. But probably more than I can afford…

chyna's avatar

@Breefield I love how that site is for “space saving” furniture, yet it shows all the rooms as huge.

Breefield's avatar

They have one very positive review on Yelp, and one very negative review, hmmmm.

YARNLADY's avatar

A comfortable futon is a futon with a good, top quality mattress, and a good frame with many slats. The more slats the better quality.

Your best bet would be a wall bed or studio bed.

KatawaGrey's avatar

Oh, man, where’s the futon love? I love sleeping on my futon pad! I admit that I was uncomfortable when I had it on a certain kind of frame but that was only if I tried to sleep on the middle part where the big metal bar was. The pad itself is wonderful and I’m not sure I’ll ever be truly comfortable on a mattress again. Some really crappy futons not unlike really crappy mattresses, mind you do compress and become hard and rocklike but a good futon is just amazing to sleep on. It’s also much easier to move than a mattress.

@JLeslie: Lots of people complain about beds being uncomfortable. It really does all depend on what kind of sleeping arrangements you need. :)

JLeslie's avatar

@KatawaGrey I probably could do the futon thing too. I can sleep in a sleeping bag on the floor.

Lightlyseared's avatar

@JLeslie a sleeping bag on the floor is more comfortable than a futon. A sleeping bag on rocky ledge in the alps at 23,000 ft is more comfortable than a futon.

jca's avatar

a friend of mine has a futon and if you sit on the edge of it you risk tilting the whole thing.

KatawaGrey's avatar

@jca: That’s why I keep the pad on the floor. I had a few of those incidents when I had the futon pad on a frame. :)

@Lightlyseared: Then I suggest you avoid them. Not everyone thinks they’re as uncomfortable as you do. The Japanese, anyone?

Lightlyseared's avatar

@KatawaGrey A traditional Japanese futon is very comfortable. The bastardised western version that also pretends to be a sofa is not.

Although – point taken – rant over

YARNLADY's avatar

@Lightlyseared You are correct. A traditional futon is a mat that is intended to lay on the floor for sleeping, and rolled up and put away during the day. The idea that you need a frame to put it on is new.

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