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chelle21689's avatar

Can HPV (cancer causing strain) be transmitted through receiving oral? NSFW?

Asked by chelle21689 (7719points) January 7th, 2016

I was just randomly thinking about this and got curious. I was diagnosed with HPV (not the genital wart kind but the cancer causing strain). I was diagnosed after being sexually active for 2 years with my current bf at the time which was about 2–3 years ago. I never had been diagnosed with my ex.

Anyways, my ex had only 1 partner before me but as I said I was never diagnosed the years I’d been with him. My current partner didn’t have any partners, but he did receive oral once (could he contract this particular strain this way)?

My body is cleared of it, thankfully and I went ahead and got the HPV vaccination just in case. I guess my main question is curious to see who I contracted it from.

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11 Answers

zenvelo's avatar

Yes, HPV can be transmitted oral to oral, oral to genital, or oral to anal. It can cause oropharyngeal cancers.

Good on you for getting the vaccine.

chelle21689's avatar

@zenvelo So if I have it and I give oral to someone, they could catch it? I’m a bit confused here HOW because the virus would be inside me down there and it’s just saliva?

zenvelo's avatar

I’m not a health care professional, just looked it up on the CDC website. You get an HPV infection just as you would any infection, so it may be growing in your genitals or on your tonsils or the back of your throat. And even though you or your BF are symptom free, there may be some viral presence for a long time.

Best place to ask questions like this is with a doctor or someone at Planned Parenthood.

chelle21689's avatar

The kind of strain I had isn’t present in mouth area but I guess I’ll have to ask a dr. Thanks for taking time to respond.

JLeslie's avatar

Yes. Oral, anal…Several famous people had HPV related oral cancer, Colleen Zenk Pinter is one. Farrah Fawcett died from anal cancer.

I’m very annoyed they don’t test for it.

cazzie's avatar

Body fluid is body fluid in this case. Your story is exactly why all young women should be getting the vaccine. One of my nieces wasn’t that lucky and hers has progressed. She’s been on regular check ups now for years.

Ladies and (and Gentlemen), get the vaccine. If you are sexually active and haven’t got it yet, get checked and get the vaccine. It works and can even work retroactively.
http://time.com/3828839/hpv-vaccine-works/

JLeslie's avatar

HPV isn’t about body fluid I don’t think. It’s tissue to tissue contact.

cazzie's avatar

@JLeslie so shaking hands? No. Even if the warts are gone, you can still get the virus from sexual contact. Sexual contact. It has to do with TYPE of tissue that is contacted. It is moist, thin membranes. Mucus membranes and the membranes inside the anus, vagina and mouth. They are all thin and moist. The man does not have to orgasm to exchange sexual fluids. Pre-cum is plenty.

JLeslie's avatar

Right, the membranes. Not ejaculate or blood. I think body fluids means ejaculate, blood, even saliva, to people. I’m not sure of the technical definition.

cazzie's avatar

Body fluids means any liquid sitting on thin membranes. It can include ejaculate (not necessarily sperm) epithelial cells, like those in the vagina or mouth or on the head of the penis. Pre-ejaculate is more than enough to spread HPV. I think you don’t have a broad enough view of body fluids and forget mucus. Mucosal membranes. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mucous_membrane

JLeslie's avatar

I know what a mucous membrane is. I used tissue, I thought that covered the tissues susceptible to those forms of HPV.

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