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delirium's avatar

Question about pie.

Asked by delirium (13686points) July 31st, 2008

Lets say, hypothetically, you are making a pie and it is burning on the edges and you take it out… you then cut it to find that the bottom center of the pie dough is still raw. Is there anything you can do about it?

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38 Answers

jlm11f's avatar

does this mean i shouldn’t come over for pie anymore?

El_Cadejo's avatar

I dont know what you could do to fix said pie, but in the future dont put your oven so high. It burnt the edges because of the high heat cooking the outside before it had time to cook all the way through.

My only thoughts on fixing this pie problem is covering it with tin foil (to prevent further burning) and then put it back in at a lower temp.

Megan64's avatar

Next time you can put some foil around the burning parts before they start burning and continue to bake the pie until you’re happy with it.

Foolaholic's avatar

hypothetically?

augustlan's avatar

they also sell things called “pie shields” that are like aluminum frisbees, with the centers cut out…I find them much easier to use than foil! You can find them at Harriet Carter, or one of those cheap mail order places for next to nothing.

delirium's avatar

SHHHHH foolaholic. SILENCE!

tinyfaery's avatar

Augustlan beat me to it. My wife puts foil around the edge of the pie crust. Works every time.

trumi's avatar

Whats wrong with doughy?
:)

Megan64's avatar

@ Trumigoodboy – There should never be raw dough on a pie. Blech. It’s better if it’s overdone than underdone. I think that’s true about all baked goods, actually. Except maybe for some types of cookies.

delirium's avatar

And brownies. They’re better underdone.

Megan64's avatar

True that @delirium

trumi's avatar

Well its okay for cobbler to be a little doughy. Why not Pie?

marinelife's avatar

I use the foil. I don’t bake enough pies to buy the tool.

Megan64's avatar

I guess because pie is supposed to be flaky and crisp-ish. Doughy and flaky can’t exist together in a peaceful pie. Cobbler is a totally different thing.

augustlan's avatar

@Marina…neither do I, I’m just THAT lazy! Seriously, I make 2 pies for Thanksgiving, and 2 pies for Christmas…that’s it. They’re just SO cheap, and SO much easier, that I totally find it worth it.

Megan64's avatar

@ Marina and @ augustian: you should try making galettes. All the flavor and deliciousness of pie and half the work. Plus they’re pretty.

augustlan's avatar

@Megan…Aren’t those like cookies with a top and bottom, filled w/ jelly? They are really pretty, like stained glass. Sadly, though, the only pies I make are pecan (too lumpy!) and pumpkin (maybe not so pretty?).

Megan64's avatar

Also I like how this thread has produced that fine photo of Anthony Bourdain in the sidebar. Sigh.

Megan64's avatar

@augustian – here’s a picture of one of many: http://tinyurl.com/56739s yum.

augustlan's avatar

@megan…sorry, and thanks. and that looks delicious. and easy. and now I’m hungry!

Foolaholic's avatar

I would say that the quality of something doughy all depends on the dough. My friend has a wood- burning pizza oven that we use often, and the dough from the local bakery that we use is so delicious that sometime we under bake on purpose…

marinelife's avatar

@Megan64 I do make clafouti.

I used to make these Bisquik cinnamon rolls. I liked them just a little bit underdone.

augustlan's avatar

@megan and Marina…I just ate 1/2 of a BIG bag of M & M’s…thanks ;)

Megan64's avatar

@Marina what’s the texture of that underneath? Like a pancake? It looks awesome.

@augustian – don’t forget to thank @delirium. She started it.

augustlan's avatar

Good point! Delirium, consider yourself thanked.

Seesul's avatar

Easy, next time make a Pandowdy.

marinelife's avatar

@Megan64 Here is recipe.

cooksalot's avatar

Perhaps not only use the foil but when you put the pie in the oven time 15 minutes then turn the temperature down about 50 degrees. Wait! I have to go check on that temperature, but I think that’s what I found works best for me.

Harp's avatar

The word “raw” may not be accurate here. Depending on the composition of the filling, it could simply be that the bottom crust is “poaching” in the moisture of the filling instead of baking in the dry environment that allows browning and flaking. If the bottom is soaking up juices from the filling, leaving it in longer won’t do a lot of good.

Most pie fillings have some way of binding the water so that it isn’t free to soak the crust, like cornstarch for fruit fillings, or eggs for custard fillings. This is also why it’s better to cook fruit (typically with the starch) before putting it in the shell, so that the juices are rendered and thickened away from the crust.

BTW, baking closer to the bottom of the oven will concentrate more eat on the bottom and less on the top.

Harp's avatar

edit: ”...will concentrate more heat on the bottom…”

syz's avatar

I concur on the foil. Many recipes include directions on foiling the outer rim until that last ten minutes or so of cooking time.

Knotmyday's avatar

Gosh I love pie.

gooch's avatar

Cook longer at lower temperature.

Seesul's avatar

@harp: I had that thought, but it was only theory, so I was hoping you would answer. I have another mystery pecan pie question for you. Why would all of the filling invert? Pecans on bottom, gooey stuff on top.

Harp's avatar

No kidding! Hmm, never seen that one… Standard recipe?

Foolaholic's avatar

Say, you didn’t ever mention what kind of pie it is!

Seesul's avatar

Yes, my (Southern) mom made them all of her life from the exact same recipe. She had one “mystery” pie in over 80 years of baking. She made one for me to take my sister when she was in college. It came out of the oven completely inverted. Tasted great, but no one has ever been able to explain it.

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