General Question

luigirovatti's avatar

Is it, at all, possible to always respect the speed limit of our car, or motorbike, etc.?

Asked by luigirovatti (1354points) 1 month ago

Particularly if one travels a lot, like, abroad. And, if not, does it scare you that the police could, somehow, find out in the perhaps not distant future?

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38 Answers

stanleybmanly's avatar

Always and at all are absolutes. They imply limits—opposite limits.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Sensible answer to a ridiculous question. “Possible”?, “respect”’?

luigirovatti's avatar

@stanleybmanly: I’m just asking, because the police is taking every precaution, obviously with technology, to identify those who break the speed limit.

rebbel's avatar

Somewhat.

I think it’s not so much the speed limit of the vehicle, as it is the speed limit set by the traffic laws.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Then the police assume the answer to your question is a definitive “yes” regardless of how poorly you phrase it.

SQUEEKY2's avatar

Transport trucks can be speed regulated through their computer mine is set for 110kph, and any mechanic looking at the computer can see if the vehicle exceeded that.

luigirovatti's avatar

@SQUEEKY2: Of course, but I’d assume that some people (maybe a big part) uses also cars, or motorbikes.

Maybe a Fluther user jelly who is also a policeman, can illuminate about the question.

ragingloli's avatar

Unless you can prove, with mathematical rigour, that the laws of physics forbid it, then the answer is yes, it is possible.

janbb's avatar

@luigirovatti Do you use a translation program to ask your questions in English? Asked with all due respect.

Dutchess_III's avatar

I don’t understand the question. I’m pretty sure the speed limit of my car is in excess of 100 mph, but I can think ever very few circumstances where I’d push that.
But I still don’t understand the question.

luigirovatti's avatar

@janbb: Let’s just say that English is not my 1st language.

stanleybmanly's avatar

That is rather clear, though your schooling in the language is clearly aristocratic. These questions are unworthy of the intellect you clearly waste. Talk to us about the centrifugal pumps!!

Pinguidchance's avatar

Yes, you can put a governor on the engine to limit speed.

flo's avatar

The speed limit of the jurisdiction/city you mean? I’m looking at the speed limit of “our car” part of the OP.

ragingloli's avatar

I do not see what is so difficult to understand about this question. It is perfectly clear.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Then splain it to us Raggy.

stanleybmanly's avatar

You’re another one! OF COURSE it’s easy to answer. The English doesn’t matter! Running out of pigeons? It bothers me when so many race horses hitch themselves to scrap wagons.

ragingloli's avatar

It is a question about the feasibility of always being law-abiding, and the probability of you never, not even once, accidentally breaking the law.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Cut Dutch and the rest of us a break, and come up with an answer to the question as it stands. Is it possible? Of course! Can you prove it? What does “respect the speed limit of our car” mean. What IS the speed limit of our car? How fast IS Luigi’s Ferrari or Ducati? And then again “Always” and “All times”? Is the question on the infallibility of drivers or the “respect” due their machines based on those machines’ capabilities? And finally EITHER question belongs in that junk wagon!

kritiper's avatar

“The speed limit of our car?” Do you mean the speed limit as set by the law or the maximum speed that could be attained by the car?
I think anyone could respect the speed limit of the car. I had a 1969 Chevy ½ ton pick-up that I had up to 130 MPH before I took my foot out of it. I don’t know how fast I could have taken it if I hadn’t slowed down.
I think someone could respect the speed limit of a car if they stuck their foot in it and took it up to the point when the engine or other drive train part blew itself to pieces, or they crashed big time..

stanleybmanly's avatar

Should we be concerned because the police will soon have the technology to identify ANY vehicle violating the speed limit? Is that the question?

ucme's avatar

Like with life, respecting your limits shows a clear lack of ambition, adventure & desire to progress.
So the answer to your question is while it is possible, it’s bad form to even try.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Well, to answer it the other way, I’ve broken the HELL out of speed limits getting to a hospital.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

Next Fall I’ve been invited to bring my car to a Land Speed Trial, to be held on a retired Air Force base (three miles plus long). with the computer reprogrammed, on my car, to remove the 135 MPH governor.
Car is capable of 165 to 170 MPH. Helmet required, no roll cage and fire-suit required!

stanleybmanly's avatar

Install the cage and invest in the helmet anyway

gondwanalon's avatar

People can’t even stop at stop signs. Why follow speed laws?

Sagacious's avatar

I’m can’t say at this moment the speed limit of my car, but I’m quite sure it is a speed at which I would never attempt to travel. It seems you are looking for something about which to fret. Don’t do that.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@Stan Thats the question imo.

The answer is yes, our cars systems are linked via computer, tracked via GPS, and soon fines could be emailed to us before we get home. They can shut down some stolen cars already, so its not unrealistic.

Governing cars like @SQUEEKY mentions can already be done for teen drivers, drunks can get sobriety checks so they cant start while intoxicated, etc..

flo's avatar

@luigirovatti I knew you probably didn’t mean speed limit of the car . I was hoping you’ld come back and clear it up.

Sagacious's avatar

You can buy a little gadget to check your own blood alcohol level before driving. I’ve seen people requiring it before letting you leave their party. Not a bad idea I guess. I don’t drink so I’m always the driver of my crowd.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@Sagacious Wow, at a party?!

Here if you have DWI’s, usually multiple, they may install a breathalyzer to keep your car from starting unless you blow clean.

Dutchess_III's avatar

My daughter got one DUI and she had to get a breathalyzer installed for one year. It also cost $70 a month and she had to drive $50 to get it reset.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@Dutchess Yikes, I thought it took more than one.

Dutchess_III's avatar

No man. They are dead serious about that shit now a days. If they’d been that serious in the 70’s my folks would be bailing me out of jail every weekend!
And there is also the money making aspect of it all. The courts got money, the breathalyzer people got money.

Sagacious's avatar

@KNOWITALL You should know that if you serve people alcohol in your home and they leave drunk and drive and hurt someone you may have some liability. Having the breathalizer at a party is good for everyone. Those too drunk to drive have plenty of people to get them home safely.

Sagacious's avatar

@Dutchess_III The Ignition Interlock devices are being used a lot in the southern states. I’m glad to see the law recognize that driving after drinking should not ruin people’s lives, which the older laws did. There are many professions that will not license you if you have a single DWI. Anything from teachers and clergy to salesmen in car dealerships. Using the Ignition Interlock keeps drinkers off the road, which should be the intent of the law, not ruining people’s lives for taking part in a legal activity. The older laws also took people’s license away for long periods which can make it impossible to work and provide for a family.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Well, she learned her lesson, anyway.

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