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elbanditoroso's avatar

Did Bernie Madoff ever show remorse before he died?

Asked by elbanditoroso (29735points) 1 month ago

today’s news

He scammed or stole tens of billions of dollars from investors – wiping out families, companies, and organizations.

Did he ever show remorse? Was he a brilliant schemer to get away with his Ponzi scheme for so long? Or was he die-hard criminal scum?

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9 Answers

ragingloli's avatar

“Madoff pleaded guilty in March 2009 to securities fraud and other charges, saying he was “deeply sorry and ashamed.””
So he definitely “showed” remorse.
Did he ever actually feel remorse?
Pretty doubtful.

zenvelo's avatar

He was trying to get a pardon from Trump, to get his sentence commuted to time served. He was not remorseful; he enjoyed “special status” in jail.

kritiper's avatar

Not enough remorse, I’d say. He and his wife tried to commit suicide but didn’t take enough drugs to get the job done.

Lightlyseared's avatar

@ragingloli deeply sorry and ashamed he got caught…

stanleybmanly's avatar

Apparently he cried genuine tears, but just how material is such an exhibition from the champion con man in the history of finance?? He might just as well be weeping for the fact that he would not die at home in his own bed.

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David_Achilles's avatar

Maybe everyone knows this already, but I found it interesting that in a New York Times article about his death they related “Faced with ruin, Mr. Madoff confessed to his two sons that his supposedly profitable money-management operation was actually “one big lie.” They reported his confession to law enforcement, and the next day, Dec. 11, 2008, he was arrested at his Manhattan penthouse.” (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/14/business/bernie-madoff-dead.html)

Imagine that. His own sons turned him in. I have to think that, knowing his own sons had turned him in and understanding that they had felt so betrayed and vindictive about his crimes, he must have felt shame, and possibly remorse. But most would postulate that his remorse was more about being caught than anything else. The confession had to be driven by the distress he felt as his house of cards was collapsing. But I find it hard to sympathize. Anyone who would betray their best friends and family to make a buck is hard to sympathize with.

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