General Question

essieness's avatar

Why is it so bad to end a sentence with a preposition?

Asked by essieness (7693points) March 11th, 2009

Oh Jeruba…

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

30 Answers

evelyns_pet_zebra's avatar

I am not sure, but I know a great joke about that question.

essieness's avatar

@evelyns_pet_zebra And you’re going to share said question, right?

Mr_M's avatar

Because it causes Armageddon.

tinyfaery's avatar

Who cares? If great works of classic literature can be written with no punctuation, then you can end and begin a sentence with whatever word you like.

peyton_farquhar's avatar

I don’t think it’s so bad to.

Lothloriengaladriel's avatar

Its like you aren’t finishing the sentence if you end it with a preposition? Making it seem like you’d need more to add? idfk

NaturalMineralWater's avatar

Because the fanboys said so? booo to grammar jokes.. new low

marinelife's avatar

It, I am fine with.

tinyfaery's avatar

Cool site MacBean.

TitsMcGhee's avatar

I, personally, think that rule is a little bit of silliness. I can see why you shouldn’t end certain sentences certain ways, but if you know what you’re doing otherwise, go for it.

wundayatta's avatar

I don’t know what you’re speaking about. And you don’t know what you’re up against. Did you see that car that went past? Did you see what was hanging on underneath? No? I guess we’ll just have to do without.

essieness's avatar

@daloon Does your brain ever slow down?

MacBean's avatar

I think it can probably be boiled down to this: When most people say you can’t/shouldn’t end a sentence with a preposition, they’re talking about things like “Where are you at?” You could say “Where are you?” just as easily, and it doesn’t sound uneducated.

Bri_L's avatar

@MacBean awesome sight!

SeventhSense's avatar

How about ending on a nice subordinating conjunction:
“As if.. ”-
Cher was such a cutie..
http://mediainfluenceonteens.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/clueless.jpg

evelyns_pet_zebra's avatar

Okay, the joke goes something like this. A new guy on the college campus is finding his way around and asks a passerby a question, “Excuse me, do you know where the cafetera is at?” The passerby, being a smarty pants, replies that one shouldn’t end a sentence with a preoposition. The guy apologizes and rephrases it, “Excuse me, do you know where the cafeteria is at, asshole?”

SuperMouse's avatar

But doesn’t it just make you nuts when someone says “that’s where it’s at”? That is like nails on a chalkboard to me. Now, in general I have no problem with a sentence ending in a preposition, but that one in particular sounds so redundant to me I just can’t stand it!

tinyfaery's avatar

Two turn tables and a microphone

SuperMouse's avatar

@tinyfaery but I love that song! Go figure…

AstroChuck's avatar

It’s a common misconception that you can’t end a sentence in a preposition. The truth is there is no such rule in English grammar. You must never, however, end a Latin sentence in a preposition.

Strauss's avatar

So we’re agreed that a preposition is something you should not (but still may) end a sentence with?

Bluefreedom's avatar

I cannot believe you asked a question like this one. Where’s a cat like you at? =)

Jack79's avatar

There’s nothing wrong with ending a sentence in a preposition with. As long as Jeruba doesn’t notice it up.

btw the example of “at” does not really count, whereas the alternative to “where are you at?” is “where are you?” and not “where at are you?”. The issue there is that “at” shouldn’t be use at all to start with. I think it applies to different cases though.

AlfredaPrufrock's avatar

Hearing “Where you at?” is how Kentuckians find each other in strange cities. It’s like a homing beacon…

cwilbur's avatar

In Latin, it’s usually nonsensical to end a sentence with a preposition. So earlier English grammarians, who looked to Latin as the model of all things, adopted the same rule.

Unfortunately, in English, you can end a sentence with a preposition. You can either read it as having the object implied, or you can read it as an adverb.

wundayatta's avatar

@essieness: you think that’s fast? You should see me when I’m manic! It feels like I understand everything and I wonder why people talk so slowly. I miss that. I feel like I have Alzheimer’s now. I have to look in a thesaurus for every other word; my memory is so bad.

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