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SirBailey's avatar

What meaning does D-Day have for you?

Asked by SirBailey (3120points) June 6th, 2009
Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

17 Answers

DarkScribe's avatar

Not much more than an event in history. It means a great deal to my father and several uncles though, they fought during the war, my father’s brothers were present at D-day.

DarkScribe's avatar

Not much more than an event in history. It means a great deal to my father and several uncles though, they fought during the war, my father’s brothers were present at the D-day (Normandy) landings.

DarkScribe's avatar

Whoops. All I did then was refresh the page. It seems to have caused another superfluous post.

westy81585's avatar

@DarkScribe Yah, something is up with fluther today….

Anyways, a fair amount. My grandfather fought in the war, and while he wasn’t present on D-Day (Pacific theater mostly), it does make me stop and think about all the things he and the other vets went through for a moment.

You’re welcome France! :P

whatthefluther's avatar

It was a terribly bloody event with a large number of casualties on both sides. If I recall, it marked the beginning of the allied push to victory.

The_Compassionate_Heretic's avatar

_
A lot of people died that day. While it was a major turning point in WWII, it was a dark day amidst an era in history during which there were many dark days.

westy81585's avatar

@whatthefluther The generally “accepted” turning point of the war was when the Soviets won the battle of Stalingrad….. BUT, this was the first major victory/most important victory on the western front.

whatthefluther's avatar

@westy81585…Thank you for the clarification. Perhaps we can agree that it opened the door through which the French would eventually welcome and embrace Jerry Lewis? See ya…wtf

westy81585's avatar

hahahahahahahaha…. ohhhhh Jerry Lewis.

SirBailey's avatar

I know someone who was a paratrooper and he used to tell stories of how they would get killed as they reached the ground from sharp spears planted and hidden by the enemy.

ml3269's avatar

It has… for me as a german and european it was the beginning of the end of the Nazi-Reich (was waren das für beschissene Anti-Menschen) sorry for the german phrase and so it is still important to me!!!!!

Darwin's avatar

I always see it as the beginning of the end of the Nazi regime, in that the Allies were no longer reacting to attacks and no longer being strictly defense. Although the war in Europe didn’t end for another year, it was the beginning of the Allied push onto the European continent.

My father fought in World War II but because of his family ties to Germany and his ability to speak German he was sent to the Pacific, where he learned Cantonese. The military needed the man-power but were afraid he might be turned by the Germans by threats to his relatives.

It wouldn’t have mattered, because most of his male relatives died in WW I, and those that didn’t were killed in the camps.

cyn's avatar

Death-day… :(

gooch's avatar

A great day of unselfish sacrifices. Young men who gave all for those they never met. Many people don’t apreciate the gift of these men.

mattbrowne's avatar

The beginning of the liberation of all Germans who had not supported the Nazis.

Darwin's avatar

@mattbrowne Too late for my family thast remained in Germany, unfortunately.

mattbrowne's avatar

@Darwin – I am very sorry to hear that!

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