General Question

RealEyesRealizeRealLies's avatar

Christians, help me out here please. Can anyone point me to a scripture quoting Jesus unequivocally claiming that he is God, or the Son of God for that matter?

Asked by RealEyesRealizeRealLies (30874points) September 15th, 2010

In Jesus’ own words. Not an inference by anyone else, but in Jesus’ own words, where did he claim that “I am God”?

When Jesus does claim, “I and the Father are one”, I believe that is saying that he is in tune with the Father, very much like a car and driver or horse and rider are often referred to as one. Otherwise why would Jesus also make statements such as “My Father in Heaven who sent me”?

Didn’t Jesus consistently refer to himself as “I, the son of man”?

Please keep in mind that I am not revealing if I personally believe that Jesus Christ was God, or Son of God, or both, or neither.

I simply want to know where Jesus himself is quotable in the Bible as stating “I am God” or “I am the Son of God”.

And if he didn’t actually say it, then could it be that humanity has actually misunderstood (or misused) the true essence of what he did say?

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33 Answers

Seek's avatar

John 8:58 (New King James Version)

58 Jesus said to them, “Most assuredly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I AM.”

…which is of course calling to memory the Old Testament name for the Hebrew God: “I AM”
Exodus 3:14 (King James Version)

14And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.

FireMadeFlesh's avatar

Matthew 27:43 “He trusts in God. Let God rescue him now if he wants him, for he said, ‘I am the Son of God.’” The teachers of the law had apparently heard him say so at least.

Luke 22:70 “They all asked, ‘Are you then the Son of God?’ He replied, ‘You are right in saying I am.’” That is close enough in my book.

RealEyesRealizeRealLies's avatar

You guys don’t see what a brilliant cunning linguist Jesus was? Your quotes all point to “I am”, and the pun Jesus is playing on that.

@FireMadeFlesh Matthew 27:43 is not Jesus speaking. He is being mocked by others as he dies on the cross.

Ben_Dover's avatar

“The Father and I are one.”

And:

Jesus shouted to the crowds, “If you trust me, you are trusting not only me, but also God who sent me. For when you see me, you are seeing the one who sent me. I have come as a light to shine in this dark world, so that all who put their trust in me will no longer remain in the dark.”

And then;

Jesus told him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one can come to the Father except through me. If you had really known me, you would know who my Father is. From now on, you do know him and have seen him!” Philip said, “Lord, show us the Father, and we will be satisfied.” Jesus replied, “Have I been with you all this time, Philip, and yet you still don’t know who I am? Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father! So why are you asking me to show him to you?”

citation

iamthemob's avatar

@Ben_Dover

None of that means he was the son of God, but only that he was a prophet through who god was communicating.

Ben_Dover's avatar

The father and i are One! I’m sorry, how much closer to a signed confession are you looking.

So, regardless of what the a Jehova Witnesses claim, Jesus does admit to being God more then once, even in the Bible.

iamthemob's avatar

@Ben_Dover

But saying “The Father and I are One” – isn’t being one with God a goal of many religions? Isn’t saying you are one with God saying that you have found a perfect faith?

It’s not a literal statement…that’s what the OP seems to be looking for. These statements just mean that he was very close with God.

FireMadeFlesh's avatar

@RealEyesRealizeRealLies It may be a pun, but as far as I can see both meanings infer that he is claiming to be the Son of God. I also mentioned after the first text that it appears the teachers of the law had heard him say so; I realise he is not quoted in the Bible saying it himself. There was also the incident with Peter, where Peter said it for him as well, and he agreed.

Ben_Dover's avatar

@iamthemob That’s really open to interpretation. I believe he was saying he’s God…and not only that biut he goes on to tell some of his followers that they too, can perform similar healings as did he, which were considered miraculous by some people.
Jesus tells us that we are all God to.
And if you think it about you will realize that most organized religions profess that God created the universe. As such, everything is made from God-energy. As such, everything is God. As such, we are all God.

Wow, Christianity it seems is about each of us being God.

iamthemob's avatar

The thing is it isn’t literal…that’s what the OP is asking for:

I simply want to know where Jesus himself is quotable in the Bible as stating “I am God” or “I am the Son of God”.

iamthemob's avatar

I think that if the quote were “MY Father and I are One” that would be something….

FireMadeFlesh's avatar

@Ben_Dover “Jesus tells us that we are all God to [sic].”
Actually the Bible says that such claims are blasphemy.

Ben_Dover's avatar

@FireMadeFlesh The church is a broken ramshackle husk of what it may once have been. All the organized church type religions seem to have erred.

But regardless, here is another biblical verse;

‘I tell you the truth,’ Jesus answered, ‘before Abraham was born, I am!’ At this, they picked up stones to stone him, but Jesus hid himself, slipping away from the temple grounds.

FireMadeFlesh's avatar

@Ben_Dover It is easy to err when your fundamental beliefs are based on unsubstantiated myth.

It seems you are right on the gods part though, because although the Bible constantly refers to one God, Psalm 82 says that humans are all gods because they are sons of God. Maybe this is yet another example of the Bible being self-contradictory.

Ben_Dover's avatar

It is simplicity in itself. God id God. God is us. we are God. It’s like the reflexive axiom..~~~~ .A = A

Just because you are told it is not so does not make it not so. It is so.

FireMadeFlesh's avatar

@Ben_Dover Maybe. I don’t work well from the assumption that there is a God though, because I cannot jump that hurdle in the first place.

Ben_Dover's avatar

@FireMadeFlesh And so your preconceived notion has basically rendered all our discussion moot.

Sweet.

FireMadeFlesh's avatar

@Ben_Dover Its not preconceived, but that is another discussion for another time. When you talk about God as an axiom, as ultimate simplicity, it seems you have assumed his existence, which renders my approaches to logically assessing the issue rather pointless.

iamthemob's avatar

@Nullo

Okay – that was God, so technically it was Jesus too kind of…but still, not from the horse’s mouth…

Nullo's avatar

@iamthemob I might remind you here that God is infallible.
Also consider the context of the passage; this was one of the episodes that established His identity and authority. People trusted God, and not quite as many (but still a fair number) trusted John the Baptist, and both of them here vouch for Jesus.

Nullo's avatar

Luke 24:49: “49 Behold, I send the Promise of My Father upon you; but tarry in the city of Jerusalem[i] until you are endued with power from on high.”

Also of note is John 21:31: ”...but these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that believing you may have life in His name.”

iamthemob's avatar

I think Luke 24:49 might do it!

JustmeAman's avatar

In every instance “quoted” it did not come from Jesus’ own mouth. When he says I and the Father are one he means in purpose. If you read about a husband and wife they also are to become one. Does that mean the husband and wife are one person? If you actually read the Bible you see the Father and the Son reffered to often and seperate. How can the voice of the FATHER (if it is one person) be heard and say This is my SON? Why is Christ reffered to as the SON? Saying that Jesus is the Christ is not saying he is GOD. Christ is a title and not his name the same could be said like this Jesus the General. The promise of the Father was to send his Son. Do you see two distinct individuals here? Just my prospect on this.

phaedryx's avatar

@JustmeAman curious what you think about John 17

phaedryx's avatar

What about Luke 4:21?

JustmeAman's avatar

It was Christ talking with his Father as he always did and I also believe that we all can and do become one with each other. This is the journey we take in life and eternal progression is the result. This supports what I said and understand.

That they all may be one; as thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee, that they also may be one in us: that the world may believe that thou hast sent me.

bob_'s avatar

I’d say that “The father and I are one” is pretty convincing. If you want something along the lines of “Hey, this is Jesus talking. I’m the son of God, but I’m God, too. Yep, that’s the ticket, we’re 2 but at the same time we’re just one dude”, you won’t find it.

However, there’s someting nobody has mentioned, and I believe is important: the Bible was NOT written in English. It has been translated from one language to the other and then another multiple times. When you translate a text, there will always be slight variations, which can turn into huge differences if you keep translating it into other languages. There is (or was, I’ve tried to find it, to no avail) a website that used Babelfish to translate a given text from English to one language, then another and another several times, and then back to English: the result was a completely different text. Obviously the Bible wasn’t translated on Babelfish, but that gives you an idea of what can happen. There is no way we can know for sure what “The father and I are one” originally meant.

Another point could be that nothing in the Bible is “directly from Jesus”, as he didn’t write any of the books, but that’s a whole other debate.

Nullo's avatar

@bob_ In fact, we have quite a bit of Scripture in its original language. The Dead Sea Scrolls, for example. It is from this pool that new translations are drawn.

bob_'s avatar

@Nullo Yes, new translations. The Dead Sea Scrolls were found in 1947. KJV was published in 1611.

According to this site:

John 8:28

KJV Bible: “Then said Jesus unto them, When ye have lifted up the Son of man, then shall ye know that I am he, and that I do nothing of myself; but as my Father hath taught me, I speak these things.”

Comments: The “he” in italics was NOT spoken by Jesus. This added word completely obscures the fact that Jesus was claiming to be the great “I AM” of the Old Testament (Exodus 3:14, John 8:58).

Ben_Dover's avatar

@Bob_ is correct. translations tend to water down the language in the bible until we get some fairly nonsensical gibberish upon which we base huge religious institutions. How lame is that?

Seek's avatar

Is it a bad time to mention that the Dead Sea Scrolls do not contain any content from the New Testament, and only excerpts from most of the books of the Old?

Nullo's avatar

@Ben_Dover, @bob_ My point is that we have originals. A good, solid Bible study usually involves quite a bit of ancient Greek and Hebrew.

@Seek_Kolinahr No, that’s fine. I was using it as a single example. Unless I am mistaken, there are others.

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