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whothei0's avatar

Do you have any random facts about numbers?

Asked by whothei0 (218points) September 26th, 2010

i am fascinated buy extremely large numbers such as googol (10^100) and random facts about large numbers such as the the average American waits about 254 hours each year or 782,237,668,900 hours waisted by America just buy waiting a year. so if you have random extremely large numbers you would like to share or random facts about numbers please share.

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32 Answers

whothei0's avatar

other random number facts he end of the Universe via Big Freeze without proton decay is subject to be 10^10^76 years into the future, which is short of googolplex.

weeveeship's avatar

Well, not a large number, just a very long one (infinite actually): Pi!

Some folks reciting it:
http://vimeo.com/10537827

rebbel's avatar

Yesterday i heard somebody saying that the number 500.000.000.000 looks awfully much like a locomotive pulling carriages.

lillycoyote's avatar

I don’t have any randoms facts about numbers but this site can provide you will as many random numbers as you will probably ever need. It’s as close as I could get to an actual answer.

Winters's avatar

According to the Jargon File, 17 is the least random number.

john65pennington's avatar

According to the Internal Revenue Service, 000, is not a legitimate number and is not recognized by them. so, if you go to local IRS office and present a Social Security card that has all zeros on it, chances are you might be arrested.

Moegitto's avatar

Putting 7, 8, and 9 together. Also putting 8, 0, 0, 8, and 5 in an calculator.

talljasperman's avatar

that all the numbers are afraid of 7… because 7, 8, 9

ETpro's avatar

Yes. It is interesting how difficult it is to identify the smallest whole number that is not interesting.

tranquilsea's avatar

A stupidly easy way to multiply by 9 is to hold your hands up in front of you and, for instance, 3×7…you hold down your 3rd finger and you have your answer: the two fingers on the right are the first number (2) and the fingers to right are the second number (7). It works right up to 9×9.

although you may look a little stupid holding your fingers up in front of you like that

Moegitto's avatar

Tranquil, I look stupid when I’m doing math in my head….

Seek's avatar

According to a rough count of my own, the “details” section of your question contains at least eight grammatical errors.

Qingu's avatar

e^(πi) + 1 = 0

This equation, called Euler’s identity, relates the five most important numbers in mathematics: e (the base of the natural logarithms), π (the ration of circle’s circumference to its diameter), i (the square root of -1), 1, and 0 (which are obviously important).

It also uses the three basic arithmatic operations (addition, multiplication, and exponentiation).

filmfann's avatar

Pi is 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937
Starting at the beginning:
31 is prime
41 is prime
59 is prime

whothei0's avatar

@filmfann surprisingly i have never heard that before that is great

crazyivan's avatar

I once heard a mnemonic for remembering the first 7 places in pi:
“How I want a drink, alcoholic of course.”

The number of letters in each word is the number… they taught we this in elementary school strangely enough.

whothei0's avatar

@crazyivan lol wow that is too good

ratboy's avatar

The sole pair of adjacent positive integers that are both integer powers are 8 and 9—8 = 2^3 and 9 = 3^2.

ratboy's avatar

The strong law of small numbers states that “there aren’t enough small numbers to meet the many demands made of them.”

ucme's avatar

2 + 69 = 4woahrrrr :¬)

Brian1946's avatar

The decimal equivalent of 1/7 is .142857142857….

The decimal equivalents of the other x/7 fractions can be found in the digits of .142857.

E.g., 2/7=.285714…, 3/7=.428571…, 4/7=.571428…, etc.

Aesthetic_Mess's avatar

7 In Irish folklore, a seventh son of a seventh son is believed to have magic powers, but in Portuguese legends he is a werewolf. In Iran, a cat is said to have seven lives, not nine.
328 Three digit #‘s are very popular in China, as the number three stands for liveliness. The number 328 sounds like “business will prosper when spoken, and business owners will happily pay extra to have these digits in their phone number.
4233 This was an unlucky # in ancient Egyptian culture. The hieroglyphs that represented 4233 can also look like the are showing a young pharaoh being murdered.
42 In Japanese, when a 4 and 2 are pronounced together, it sounds like “going to death” and so the number is avoided at all costs.
4 The fear of the number four in many Asian countries is comparable to the fear of 13 in the West.

ETpro's avatar

@Aesthetic_Mess 42 is verboten in Japan.? But… But… That’s the answer to “Life, the Universe and Everything!” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrases_from_The_Hitchhiker's_Guide_to_the_Galaxy#The_number_42

Aesthetic_Mess's avatar

@ETpro It’s not the actual number I think. It’s just how it is pronounced, because it sounds like “going to death”. I don’t think anything is wrong with the actual number 42.

Ultramarine_Ocean's avatar

I’m not sure if this true or not but the first number to have an a in it is one thousand. I’m to lazy to check but I think this is true. Of course I would notice.

crazyivan's avatar

The only numeral in which all the letter appear alphabetically when spelled out is 40.

whothei0's avatar

there are only three letters that never appear in any number. what are they?

Brian1946's avatar

@whothei0

My guess is J and K.

According to this table, every other letter appears.

ETpro's avatar

@Ultramarine_Ocean Good one. I just ran thourhg it in my head. Sure seems to be true.

whothei0's avatar

yeah i didnt count zero because it is the absence of numbers but yes j, k and z it si a fun one though
i got this from the book “number freak” by Derick Niederman it has many more goofy facts about the numbers 1 – 200

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