Social Question

ETpro's avatar

Where should you live to avoid natural disasters?

Asked by ETpro (34247 points ) May 27th, 2013

This seemed like a great follow-on question to yesterday’s one about Moore, OK; since so many people in that thread mentioed relocating to safer ground. Where is the safe ground? According to this I’m living in one of the safest parts of the USA when it comes to escaping nature’s wrath. But one massive, winter coastal-storm with hurricane force winds, extremes of snow and ice, could black out electricity to the area for weeks and bring sub-zero temperatures that would leave many dead in its wake. Where do you think is the safest spot to live in order to avoid natural disasters? Is it safe from man-made disasters as well? How about crime? What do you see as acceptable risk?

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48 Answers

ucme's avatar

Silicon Valley

flutherother's avatar

Underground. Or maybe @ucme‘s garden shed.

tups's avatar

No natural disasters in Denmark thus far. That’s all I know.

ucme's avatar

@flutherother You’d fit in just fine with all the other tools ;-}

PhiNotPi's avatar

I feel that there has always been a lot people who say “don’t live in tornado alley, that’s stupid” or “don’t live in California, else you’ll get killed by an earth quake” or “don’t live on the Gulf Coast, else you will have hurricanes.” That happens especially after major disasters, when people ask “why rebuild the damaged cities?”

The truth is that no place is safe. All places have risk, many of which are impossible to quantify, much less predict.

Here’s my advice: Have the recommended supplies ready for a natural disaster, and drive safe. Car accidents kill a lot more people than tornadoes.

El_Cadejo's avatar

All places have risks sure but some places IMO are a lot more ridiculous to habitat than others. I still don’t understand why people believe it’s a good idea to build on a barrier island and on top of that destroy the dunes for a better view…

cookieman's avatar

I’m with @ETpro. No, literally, we’re in the same area. It’s true that after surviving the Blizzard of ‘78, nothing else seems to have been that big of an issue. But ya never know what the future, and Mother Nature may bring.

Pachy's avatar

I’m with @uberbatman. Sooner or later, something involving wind, water, hail, lightning, snow, space debris and lately, sinking ground, strikes somewhere. It’s a price we pay for living on a planet.

Blondesjon's avatar

I’m guessing someplace that is completely unnatural?

nofurbelowsbatgirl's avatar

My approach to this? No matter the safest place you live sooner or later death is gonna come and get you. Take out every possible natural disaster that you mentioned. You decide to move and take advantage of that beautiful place and take up race car driving as a hobby only to die by having your race car’s drive chain snap and decapitate you. Seriously it happened to J. G. Parry-Thomas in 1927.

flip86's avatar

Maine. The worst we have to deal with is the occasional nor’easter and power outage during the winter. Hurricanes are usually thunderstorms by the time they hit us and tornadoes rarely, if ever, happen here. We get earthquakes, but they are so small that nobody ever feels them.

Dutchess_III's avatar

The world’s entire population should move to Denmark or Cheyenne mountian!

rojo's avatar

@Dutchess_III I agree everyone move to Cheyenne Mountain.

@tups where is the Danish embassy again?

Symbeline's avatar

@ucme‘s tool shed.

tups's avatar

@Dutchess_III That would certainly be cozy!

@rojo what Danish embassy?

ucme's avatar

@Symbeline You fucking hoe :D

elbanditoroso's avatar

Las Vegas area – no earthquakes, no hurricanes, no tornados

Dutchess_III's avatar

Pretty sure the Danish embassy is at Dunkin’ Donuts.

tups's avatar

@Dutchess_III I don’t get it

KNOWITALL's avatar

I live in tornado alley, we have a fault line and the old nuclear silo’s could make us a target, but I actually feel very safe. We have a lot of natural resources and terrain that would make survival easier.

The beach areas scare me a little bit though, even the insurance companies say they’re a liability.

Symbeline's avatar

@ucme It’s about time you take me out…I’m a little rusty.

ucme's avatar

@Symbeline I can dig around in your little hole if you like…only if you wanna :D

nofurbelowsbatgirl's avatar

@tups If you like to be extreme I’m sure you could even have a Danish as your ring bearers pillow and have an extreme Danish wedding.

You can buy a danish here in Canada @ Tim Hortons for 1.40$. :p

cheebdragon's avatar

Living somewhere with a somewhat predictable tornado season every fucking year is just not the same as living in California where major earthquakes are extremely rare and completely unpredictable. I’ve lived in California for almost 15 years, I’ve only felt about 5–6 moderate earthquakes but none of them caused any damage.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@cheebdragon I’ve watched tornado’s go over the house and lived here 40 years, doesn’t mean one won’t kill you someday.

Besides, you guys have landslides, too, I’ve seen other jellies post about the wolf problem in their frickin yards killing dogs?!

nofurbelowsbatgirl's avatar

I love being dragged through the mud! So anywhere where there is lots of wind and mud is fine with me! Maybe we can call that place “Pun Intended.”

Dutchess_III's avatar

@tups A Danish pastry, usually shortened to just “A Danish.”

Hutchinson, Kansas caught on fire in 2000. It was a mess!

Dutchess_III's avatar

(We had an earthquake here in Kansas a couple of years ago. It only lasted a few seconds, just enough time to realize what it was, then it was over. It was cool.)

ETpro's avatar

Ha. Tornadoes. Floods. Earthquakes. Volcanoes… But the neighborhood I just moved out of last year was devastated by a tidal wave of molasses. It killed 21 people and injured 150.

Someday, something’s going to get ya. There’s just no escaping that. Maybe it’s better to be taken out quickly by something as interesting as a molasses flood than to wither away in a cancer ward or be so riddled with Alzheimer’s you don’t even understand that you’re dying, or that you’re pooping in your pants while you wait for the end.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Tidal wave of molasses!! LOLL! Oh…that WAS bad!

Dutchess_III's avatar

Man…that was REALLY bad @ETpro.

Plucky's avatar

The moon…until everyone gets space madness and kills each other.

Blondesjon's avatar

Chicken pot pie, chocolate covered raisins, glazed Ham! Oh, my beloved ice-cream bar. How I love to lick your creamy center. And your oh, so nutty chocolate covering. You’re not like the others. You like the same things I do: Wax paper. Boiled football leather. Dog breath. We’re not hitchhiking anymore. We’re riding!

Dutchess_III's avatar

There is no AIR on the moon @Plucky! That would be a natural disaster.

ETpro's avatar

@Dutchess_III But at least @Plucky has imagined a mercifully brief natural disaster for us.

@Blondesjon But wouldn’t the natural sine wave of molasses floods cancel out the wavelength of chocolate chocolate covered raisins?

Plucky's avatar

@Dutchess_III I meant in space stations :P

cheebdragon's avatar

Alzheimer’s might not be that bad, you would never know what was going on but you might be okay inside your own little world. My great grandma use to stand in the hallway and talk to herself in the mirror….it was sad but kind of funny how polite she was to her reflection guest…“hello, would you like to sit down?” “Oh you’re okay? are you sure? Because you could come in the other room and sit down.”...“I’ll just be in here sitting down, let me know if you need anything”...“we have a nice sofa, very comfortable.”
if you made the mistake of walking down that hallway while she was talking, she would stop you and introduce you, but usually as someone else from her past, lmfao, she would talk to the mirror at least 10–15x everyday.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Well…my mom did the same thing, only she’d talk to her legs as though they were separate from her….not only separate, but other people. She’d pat one leg and say “Do you want a cup of coffee? No? Well, I’m going to have some.”
She didn’t recognize herself in the mirror…“I’m not that old! It can’t be me!” I finally asked her how old she was and she said, “I think about 45 or so.” (I was 48!) So I found a pic of her in her mid 40’s, holding her first born grand baby (who was 23 and standing right next to her.) I framed it and put it in a predominate place.
“That’s much better!” She said.
We moved her about 3 times. Each time my husband would RIP the mirrors off the walls because she just couldn’t stand it.
But so much of the time she’d look at me in quiet desperation. She was aware that something was wrong and it was completely out of her control. Sometimes she cried. It was horrible.
Anyway, how in the world did we get on this conversation?!

Paradox25's avatar

I would say that outside of the occasional Nor’easter, cold spells and severe thunderstorms north central Pennsylvania is fairly safe. We don’t get hurricanes, floods (I live very high up), earthquakes or too many tornadoes around my parts. We did have a verified F1 tornado bounce through the valley behind my house in 1999, but that was pretty much it. I did hear that I live in a high risk area for sinkholes though.

I can tell you one thing however, if the ocean temperature continues to rise we’ll be seeing much more dangerous weather phenomena than even the current worst hurricanes and tornadoes. Hypercanes are just one example of what I’m talking about here.

ETpro's avatar

@Paradox25 Good point on continued Global Warming throwing the current models into the rubbish bin.

rojo's avatar

As an aside;

Are we also looking toward Hypernados in our future?

Dutchess_III's avatar

2.5 miles wide. Wow! Well, it’s in our past, for sure @rojo.

mattbrowne's avatar

Germany. Smaller risks, but not zero risks. We’ve got serious flooding in some areas right now.

ETpro's avatar

@rojo It’s difficult to say for sure. Warming adds energy, but it also relocates the jet streams and ocean conveyors. It could make tornadoes more frequent and more destructive, but it could also do just the opposite. Whatever it does in the future, it sure has thrown living Hell at us this year.

@Dutchess_III 2.6 miles wide. 2.5 miles was the previous record.

@mattbrowne Well, Antarctica has a very low risk of flooding, but there are offsetting disadvantages of living there. :-)

Stay dry, my friend.

cheebdragon's avatar

I might be wrong but I seem to remember reading that there are parts of Antarctica that haven’t seen rain in something like 10 years.

El_Cadejo's avatar

@cheebdragon The Atacama Desert in Chile is quite dry as well.
“The average annual rainfall is about one inch (25 mm) and in some mid-deserts spots, rain has never been recorded, at least as long as humans have measured it.”
Edit: WOW now that’s cool

ETpro's avatar

@cheebdragon I don’t think Antarctica has seen any rain to speak of since it arrived in its current position about 25 million years ago after breaking away from the supercontinent Gondwana 170 million years ago. Precipitation, yes. Rain, no. Coastal regions get a rainfall equivalent averaging around 8 inches per year. Inland the precipitation is much less: in some areas being virtually nonexistent. It’s the driest continent on Earth and houses Earth’s driest desert, albeit one made entirely of water instead of sand. Most of what passes for snow in the inland areas is blowing snow thanks to it being the windiest continent.

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