General Question

pleiades's avatar

When juicing is there a major fall out with fiber intake?

Asked by pleiades (6453 points ) April 17th, 2014

Or is there enough fiber in the juice still?

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

24 Answers

gailcalled's avatar

I don’t understand what “major fall out in fiber in take” means.

pleiades's avatar

Edited. Maybe it’ll make more sense in “perfect English” @gailcalled :P

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

@pleiades What does that mean?

Mimishu1995's avatar

@gailcalled @Adirondackwannabe I think he means that if you use fruit to make juice, will the fruit loses its fiber.

I think so @pleiades. I used to read somewhere that fruit juice and normal fruit are nearly the same. The only difference is that fruit juice doesn’t have as much fiber as normal fruit.

Wish I could link to it right now. I’ll inform you when I do though :)

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

@Mimishu1995 When you consume the whole fruit, you get all of the pulp and stuff.

Mimishu1995's avatar

@Adirondackwannabe Only when you eat it, not drink it.

Or at least that’s what I read…

seekingwolf's avatar

Yeah, you miss out on the fiber that’s in the skin/pulp. Depends on the person but the lack of it after a while may “back you up”.

pleiades's avatar

@Mimishu1995 That’s exactly what I’m referring to :) The fibers in the fruit, when juiced are essentially separated right? Or does a healthy amount enter the juice stream… Is what I’m trying to investigate.

pleiades's avatar

Well now that I re-read OP “juicing” is used quite vaguely. I’m definitely not referring to steroid abuse! Hope that clears some up.

Smitha's avatar

When juicing you extract the juice and leave behind the pulp, which has fiber, so the best solution would be to blend the fruits or vegetables to keep the fiber.

livelaughlove21's avatar

@Smitha No, the best solution would be to eat the fruit or vegetables instead of pulverizing them into drink form. What’s the reason behind juicing?

Smitha's avatar

@livelaughlove21 You are right! I just meant the best option to consume it in liquid form.

JLeslie's avatar

If you pulverize the whole fruit it will still have the fiber, if you squeeze the juice out it is basically like drinking a Coke with some vitamin C. Sugar level is almost exactly the same in Coke and orange juice. Orange juice squeezed from the orange has almost no fibre. If you add back some pulp you get a little fibre.

Drinking in liquid form takes up less room in your stomach even from the whole fruit and you are more likely to consume more. More calories and more sugar.

GloPro's avatar

Juicing is not really like drinking coke with vitamin C. If you are extracting juice from kale or spinach, for example, you are getting the whole greens nutrients packed into a cup. Iron, antioxidants, folic acid, vitamins D, E, B, etc. Juicing has many benefits, whereas drinking a soda does not.

Cruiser's avatar

This what the Mayo Clinic has to say on juicing…

“whole fruits and vegetables also have healthy fiber, which is lost during most juicing. [snip] However, there’s no sound scientific evidence that extracted juices are healthier than the juice you get by eating the fruit or vegetable itself.”

They also pointed out that juicing can enable you to consume more sugars and calories by juicing leading to possible weight gain.

Smashley's avatar

Enough fiber? You’re talking about juice: sugar and water, with some vitamins here and there. You won’t get enough fiber (or fat, or complex carbs, or protein) from fruit alone, juiced or not. A diversified diet with other sources of fiber is essential.

Juice is candy.

JLeslie's avatar

@GloPro If you squeeze the juice out of a fruit the sugar quanitity is like a Coke. Especially orange juice. I said nothing about vegetables.

GloPro's avatar

The OP said juicing. Most people combine fruits and veggies, herbs and spices. It can be quite healthy. Coke, in any form, is not healthy.

Cruiser's avatar

@Smashley More than just water and sugars in fruits and veggies they are chock full of minerals and vitamins that are really great for you. I read in my search on this topic that a tomato has over 10,000 chemicals in it and they are doing extensive research on them to see why tomatoes are so good for you.

JLeslie's avatar

@GloPro I wrote that pulverizing whole fruits means eating the fiber in the fruit, but squeezing it is just the juice. I think I said what you said, I don’t know why you singled out my coke comment. Look at the nutrition label on orange juice and on Coke. The sugars are almost identical.

GloPro's avatar

I just disagree that you might as well drink a coke, I suppose. But I wouldn’t ever drink 12 ounces of orange juice, either.

JLeslie's avatar

I’m not promoting Coke, I am just talking about the sugar in both.

Smashley's avatar

@Cruiser – Yes, sure. Fruit is good for you in moderation. Juice is pushing moderation, and “juicing” is overdoing it completely.

seekingwolf's avatar

I’d rather just eat the whole fruit and feel satisfied with that, while getting my fiber. Juicing allows you to drink more calories and sugar than just eating produce whole. No thanks.

Obviously, juicing is better than drinking a coke. But that’s not saying much. Don’t drink your calories.

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