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Kardamom's avatar

Do you ever ask questions that have several, but simple, parts to them?

Asked by Kardamom (23808 points ) 3 months ago

Please read the details. This is not a yes or no question.

What I mean is, do you ever ask questions that have more than one part to them, because asking more questions within the details, if answered in their entirety (rather than just answering the title Q) will get you more useful and specific information? Do you ever ask Q’s that should elicit a specific answer, rather than a simple yes or no, but you still get yes or no answers anyway? Do you flag those answers? Do you try to explain again, what you are asking, on the thread itself? Or do you just ignore the answers that seem to have missed the mark?

Do you ever wonder why people bother to answer questions with just a yes or no, when those two answers do not really answer the question, nor do they give any insight or information or help to the person asking the Q?

Example below.

Can you tell me the name of a good hair salon?

Here are the details inside which are asking for more specific information:
If you know of one, which is the best stylist to pick from that salon? How much do you normally tip?

Do you often find that people are unwilling, or can’t quite grasp the concept of the question, in its entirety, which includes the details and extra bits that make the answers more useful?

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9 Answers

dxs's avatar

I often ask questions about a general topic, so sometimes I feel like I’m asking too much. And I try to make it look like I’m not asking that much, and I think that makes the question seem vague. An optimistic way to put it is “open-minded”.

longgone's avatar

I do. If I get simple answers, I just accept these. I wouldn’t flag them, but if I really needed answers, I may be tempted to explain what I was trying to ask.

I think one of the reasons for ignoring the details of a question is that this is, after all, the internet. Many of us are probably doing several things at once – waiting for the kettle to boil, eating pretzels, listening to music. Many of us are, at least, supposed to be doing something different. In both cases, distracted answers are not surprising.

Kardamom's avatar

It bums me out a little bit, more so on other people’s Q’s than my own (because I know that a few specific Jellies, not naming any names, but they know who they are, will give me the correct/specific/useful answer that I need or want) but I hate it when I see a Jelly ask a Q, especially if it’s something rather important, like Can you give me the name of a good pediatrician in Peoria, Illinois? We just moved here and my baby is sick? What is the best website to search for a doctor in a specific city? and then they get the answer: No.

I can’t understand why those people even bother to answer. Do some Jellies feel the need to answer every single Q on Fluther? Even if they don’t have an answer?

dxs's avatar

I never flag responses on my posts as long as they’re helpful and promote discussion. Some stuff got modded in this relatively straight-forward question that I asked, but I never flagged it because I thought it was interesting, insightful discussion. This post didn’t answer the question at all, but I still thought it was an interesting response, so I didn’t flag it but I didn’t GA it either since it didn’t discuss the topic.
On the other hand, there are responses such as this one that, even after flagging and discussing it with mods via PM, the mods insist is helpful and relevant, but I just find it opinionated and agenda-pushing.
[addition]: That last thread I linked is a similar situation as the one you just described. Technically, “No.” answers the question, but to be helpful, Fluther’s intention, there’s more than just a yes/no to the question, especially after reading the details.

Pachy's avatar

Each jelly has his/her own way of asking questions and commenting on them. I do tend to bypass multi-part questions unless the topics really interest me because single-topic ones are just easier for me to focus on.

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

What I mean is, do you ever ask questions that have more than one part to them, because asking more questions within the details, if answered in their entirety (rather than just answering the title Q) will get you more useful and specific information?
Often a question cannot be covered without secondary questions to aid the main question. Some can be asked with just a simple question but since it often can’t be asked in a way to limit errant answers (leading), or if you limit the parameters of the answers (de facto polling), both of which Dr. Jelly just hates.

Do you ever ask Q’s that should elicit a specific answer, rather than a simple yes or no, but you still get yes or no answers anyway? Do you flag those answers?
Usually just quips and other silliness, but I guess one could be happy, there was at least a response. I don’t flag them, waving that many flags would make my arms too tired.

Do you ever wonder why people bother to answer questions with just a yes or no, when those two answers do not really answer the question, nor do they give any insight or information or help to the person asking the Q?
I guess a “yes” or “no” to the question would be better than some quip or silly comment that had no relevance to the question at all.

Do you often find that people are unwilling, or can’t quite grasp the concept of the question, in its entirety, which includes the details and extra bits that make the answers more useful?
I would want to give them the benefit of the doubt that they could follow the logic of the question, so that leaves that they are just unwilling for some reason.

dxs's avatar

By the way, who remembers this Jelly?

longgone's avatar

@dxs Haha, great! :)

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