Social Question

ragingloli's avatar

Do you still believe that the voter ID laws were not about voter suppression?

Asked by ragingloli (48214points) October 25th, 2013

Look at this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOnhdYGsyXU
Top Repub openly admits that voter ID laws are voter suppression laws.

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

76 Answers

KNOWITALL's avatar

I don’t think it’s racist, I think it’s leveling the playing field.

An entertainment show is not necessarily a great source for serious news, and it’s obviously skewed liberal as we all know. But it’s humorous.

JLeslie's avatar

I think they are about supression, but I also think we should have ID when we vote. The states should make a state issued ID card available for free for those who do not have a driver’s license. As long as there is at least a year for people to get an ID before the polls open I don’t see it as a big deal.

hearkat's avatar

I think that many of the voting laws and redistributing and all that is done to skew the vote.

I agree that State-issued photo I.D. should be free and available to all people. They could offer the I.D. and voter registration through the Department of Human Services, not just at the motor vehicles department – that way, people who sign up for any public assistance, food stamps, unemployment, etc. has access to getting I.D. when they go in to sign up for those services. I also agree that there should be a one-year time period from which the voter I.D. law is created until it becomes enacted.

glacial's avatar

@KNOWITALL “I think it’s leveling the playing field.”
Please explain. I don’t understand what you mean by this.

This is not the first time a Republican has slipped up and told the horrible truth about these voter laws: they are designed to prevent people unlike them from voting. I can’t think of anything less patriotic.

JLeslie's avatar

@hearkat When I read your post I thought what a great idea. Then I wondered if people are getting public assistance without ID?

KNOWITALL's avatar

@glacial I’m not rich. I have a marriage license, a birth certificate, a bank account and a photo id and somehow I always make it to the polls during elections even though I work full time.

Personally, I don’t think we need to make special allowances for people who don’t have the required items in time to vote, not in large numbers. It’s each of our Personal Responsiblity to take care of our personal business, that’s one of the reasons I’m Republican because I firmly believe that.

Read this ‘liberal’ article and see how ridiculous it sounds to say ‘women are busier than men and they often don’t immediately change their drivers license after getting married, making them ineligible to vote.’
Really? Everyone I know does or you get a letter from the IRS reminding you to do so. It’s bunk.

http://www.policymic.com/articles/69165/republicans-are-trying-to-pull-off-something-that-will-outrage-every-wendy-davis-supporter

JLeslie's avatar

@KNOWITALL I don’t even understand that article. The name on our voter registration is our legal name as filed with the DMV, isn’t it? If we have a driver’s license we have all the ID we need to vote. I don’t get what that article is trying to say. When I got married my name was not changed until I changed it. So my drivers and my voting was still in my maiden name.

It says only 66% of women have their ID in their current legal name? Can’t be correct.

tom_g's avatar

Has anyone established that we are developing solutions here to problems that actually exist? In other words, I have not seen any credible evidence that voter fraud is a serious problem in the US. And in many of the cases that have been confirmed, it was via mail-in ballot, which would not be improved with voter ids.

@KNOWITALL: “I think it’s leveling the playing field.”

If this is leveling the playing field, the implication is that it is not level now. What has been keeping the playing field from being level for Republicans so far?

KNOWITALL's avatar

@JLeslie You wouldn’t think so, but you also wouldn’t think people would let their tags expire and still drive or let their auto insurance lapse and still drive. People are surprising in their lack of concern for important thing’s, but that is no one’s fault but their own.

You hear thing’s like Democrats encouraging the poor and non-English speaking to vote for their candidate for cash, etc… all kinds of rumors on both sides and a few facts as well.

JLeslie's avatar

@KNOWITALL It doesn’t matter if they haven’t changed their name is my point. I agree with you that the article is bullshit. It is true that changing a driver’s license or getting a mew one now requires multiple ID’s in most states. I just got mine back in FL for the second time (my third time holding a license here, second time getting it back) and this time was unbelievable. I needed three forms of ID I think.

My concern for voting is people not legal to vote voting. My mom feels that is a big problem where she lives, but I don’t know any actual statistics. I don’t see how their would be accurate statistics on it anyway.

But, @tom_g is right that we can vote through the mail, so what are we really curing?

KNOWITALL's avatar

@JLeslie There’s all kinds of fraud rumors but little fact. Another rumor was the use of deceased person’s information being used to vote for a party, but this article is interesting.

We have long argued against the push for absentee voting and/or Vote-by-Mail that both of the major political parties continue to advocate for, since it allows them to micromanage their own voters to increase turnout, etc.
http://www.bradblog.com/?p=9481

And another saying it’s rare—
http://votingrights.news21.com/article/election-fraud/

KNOWITALL's avatar

@tom_g I think both parties feel the other is manipulating or being deceitful, but from my research I just don’t see that proof.

JLeslie's avatar

@KNOWITALL Well, from that video the OP posted it looks like the Republicans don’t want people who are legal to vote to vote. Like that mayor obe town up from me in TN who posted on his facebook that we should go back to the days of only property owners being able to vote. That was back the first time when Obama was running. Only a southern biggot (of course he happens to be a right wing republican also) would say such a thing. Mind you, I often defend people who use bigotted and racist terms as not necessarily being racist themselves, but that one was just too targeted and has too much history. It isn’t like calling someone who is Asian Oriental just because they don’t realize one word is out of favor now. I also am not ne fo those people who goes around saying everyone should vote. I think every citizen should be allowed to vote, but I think an unifromed voter who doesn’t really know who or what they are voting for should not vote.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@JLeslie I think that a lot of uninformed people vote, and a lot of eligible people don’t for their own reasons. You have no idea how annoyed I get when people I know say ‘Oh, I don’t care a thing about politics, don’t bother telling me.”

Here’s some racist comments from Democrats. No racist should be in office if you ask me, including Hillary Clinton.
http://mediatrackers.org/national/2013/06/20/6-horribly-racist-comments-from-obama-admin-officials

muppetish's avatar

I think the problem with regulations for obtaining an ID in order to vote (in California, you must present your ID the first time that you vote and every other time, you do not need to present identification) is that there is so little literature out there informing every citizen about the requirements and registration process. In high school, my AP Government teacher encouraged us to register the moment we turned eighteen, but I know that not every high school senior has access to an instructor who will do the same.

Programs like Rock the Vote are important to convince a younger generation—particularly a younger minority generation—that their vote is important and that they should care about politics in addition to providing them with the specific steps they need to take in order to become registered.

tom_g's avatar

@KNOWITALL: ”@tom_g I think both parties feel the other is manipulating or being deceitful, but from my research I just don’t see that proof.”

So, I guess I’m back to my first question: Are we creating a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist? And in doing so, are we creating at least as many problems as we’re supposedly solving.

Also, I’m still a little confused on the “leveling the playing field” comment.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@tom_g I agree that the problem doesn’t exist from what I have found.

Leveling the playing field = people who don’t have the intelligence/ gumption to get a photo id in order to vote, shouldn’t vote. That prevents those kind of people voting for either party based on cash, coersion or other incentives. If they exist.

JLeslie's avatar

@KNOWITALL Of all of those only number 3 I question that maybe the person is racist, even that I am not sure, most of those seem like they can be joking with not at and not necessarily saying the person is racist. Like I said, I usually defend people who say some that can be construed as racist as not being racist themselves. The mayor I mentioned was talking about preventing black people voting for Obama. Where I come from people joke about Greeks owning diners and we know a lot of Vietnamese people own nail salons, stating the obvious isn’t a big deal to me. Neither is making a joke that obviously everyone knows is not a true comment, like number one on your link.

tom_g's avatar

@KNOWITALL – So while you don’t feel as though voter fraud is a problem, you advocate for voter id because it would cut down on the number of people who would vote?

Would you support other hurdles, such as IQ tests?

And just to be clear, do you support voter id laws where the id is paid for by the individual, or do you only support them if subsidized by the state?

muppetish's avatar

@KNOWITALL I don’t think that’s leveling anything. We threw out mandatory literacy tests as racist a long time ago. Using intelligence, in any manner, as a means for assessing whether a citizen is equipped enough to vote is not fair. Not to mention, as I know from personal experience, that there are plenty of stupid people voting who have managed to meet any ID requirements.

I live in an area that is predominantly Hispanic with a large population of ESL speakers and with a sizable population of citizens who do not speak any English at all (and this part is not limited to Spanish speakers as many friends I know have family who only speak Tagalog, Mandarin, Vietnamese, etc.) Without the proper information, in their native language, to inform them on how to obtain a license, how to register to vote, and who their potential candidates are, these people might be cheated out of essential knowledge to play an important role in the government that their money helps support.

Not all of these citizens have a driver’s license (many use public transportation.) And many might not have the money to spare for a $27 ID (reduced fare makes it $8—but that’s only if they have been informed on how to obtain it.)

JLeslie's avatar

@muppetish Sorry, but that is BS to me. In my state they can take the driver’s test in Spanish. If they became citizens having immigrated here they have more ID’s than most native born citizens do to begin with. When my husband became a citizen, as he walked out the door after his ceremony, there were people there to sign him up to vote. If there are that many people speaking Spanish where you live, they certainly can get information in Spanish for what to do. My FIL needed help with some Social Security stuff (he isn’t a citizen) and I asked he have an appointment with a Spanish speaker at his local office and they accomodated that. Most of the Spanish community is bilingual and they can help each other, they do help each other.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

I’m in North Carolina, this law is not just asking for an ID at the voter polls. They also are reducing and restricting days of early voting AND sixteen and seventeen year olds can no longer register early as a voter AND stopped same day voter registration and voting ( if you recently moved to a new home ).

Once again if you don’t look like me, you should not be voting.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@JLeslie I find it fairly easy to get through life not making racist comments or jokes, but to each their own. Also, reading your recent post, your husband seems to have taken the initiative to get legally eligible, that’s not too much to ask and those who care, care.

@tom_g I haven’t seen PROOF that voter fraud is a problem. Additionally I don’t think anyone who cannot get a photo id should be ‘coddled’ so they can vote, it’s a right and a privelage. IQ tests may be taking it a little far, I admit. I don’t think the government needs to pay for anyone’s id, there are plenty of poor people who have photo id, it’s a basic necessity in life imo.

@muppetish I know a lot of non-native’s who have started in ESL and learned what they needed and got it, as I’m sure you know they aren’t required to pay taxes for the first seven years (not sure if that’s still the norm). My Vietnamese friends would readily admit they wouldn’t have known what they were voting for straight off the plane from Rome.

I’m not sure why anyone would want thousands of people voting who had no clue whether what Republican or Democrat even meant.

muppetish's avatar

@JLeslie Why is it BS? I was referring the citizens in my area who DO NOT drive. Not because they do not have access to a test in their language, but because they DO NOT have a car and rely on other means for transportation. I’m a fourth generation American and I can’t afford a car. I do not have a driver’s license, but have a California ID. I take the bus.

This is not strictly speaking an immigration issue. At no point did I mention the citizens I were referring to were not legal residents nor did I mention what generation American they were or how long they had been in the US. While almost all literature has been translated into Spanish here, there is not a strong push for voter registration nor have I ever seen that literature translated into Tagalog (even though we have a Filipino presence here.)

I think there needs to be a stronger translation push AND there are also needs to be a stronger insistence on the importance of voter participation from non-native speakers and minorities in general. Many of these people do not believe that their vote counts or they they can make a difference if they are even inclined to be concerned about the politics of this country. Many don’t even realize how important it is and I think that needs to change.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@muppetish A lot of the population feels that way, too. Especially the 18–25 yr olds. I still have family members (extended) that don’t give a rip either way, which is amazing to me since they have children and live in America.

I hear Republicans saying that all minorities are swayed by Democrats, which I’m skeptical of as well. Many people come here for a better life and are really into the Republican motto of personal responsiblity and that earning your money by working for it, is the American Dream.

As far as your translations go, I am torn because I feel like people should know English when living and participating in American life and politics. But I also feel that if you’re in a major Spanish-speaking area, you have spanish translations available for those people to vote. Their votes are important!

JLeslie's avatar

@muppetish I understood they don’t drive. My point is state agencies like DMV and federal agencies like Social Security do a lot to accomodate Spanish speakers, and other languages too. The Spanish language is not a big barrier in most states in America to get information. Other languages make it more difficult, but if there is a large community they can get the information, because in large communities there are bilingual people. It takes about ten years to become a citizen, at minimum 5, and by then most people understand how some things work, where to find help, and they have multiple ideas from working permits, social security cards and green cards, finally getting their documents to be citizens. Those documents can be used to attain other ID’s. I, as I said above, think they should get a free state issued ID if they do not drive. If they can figure out how to become a citizen, which can be scary and full of papeork and hoops, they certainly can fugure out how to get a state issued ID.

I am all in favor in educating new citizens about voting and political issues.

@KNOWITALL My husband does not compare to people with very little education who come here for opportunity to work. He came here for his college education already fluent in English with a family who bought a small townhouse for him to live in and a Mercedes while he went to school (he did have two years in an America in high school, 9&10th grade, but I am not counting that for this).

muppetish's avatar

@KNOWITALL I am also skeptical about the fear of minorities voting democratic. Minority party representation varies far more than some people might think. However, I absolutely disagree that people should be required to learn English in order to be politically involved Americans.

@JLeslie I will concede that perhaps I am not as fully aware of the immigration process as I should be and that it is possible that they do have access to some form of legal identification that would qualify them to voter registration. However, I still think there is a major issue—again, in my current area of residence as I cannot speak for the whole of the US—in getting all citizens access to the information they need to be informed voters.

Voting begins in a couple of weeks and the literature they mailed out only has some bios in Spanish and no information printed in any other language despite the increasing Chinese, Vietnamese, and Filipino populations in our city. There is a page inside that provides information on where to obtain a sample ballot and vote by mail application in a different language, but not all citizens will think to look or call.

I think in general, not exclusively related to minority non-native speakers, that there needs to be a stronger push on the importance of registering and voting. While some might register (both my SO and my family are politically active) others might never do it (two close friends of mine come from families who never participate.) It frustrates me. And I want it to change.

JLeslie's avatar

@muppetish I agree there can be a limited amount of information about politicians in “foreign” languages. To become legal here you get finger printed, physical exam, translated birth certificate, fill forms, pay fees, deal with government agencies, go for an interview. Voting is a walk in the park compared to all that, unless you are here under asylum, that is easier. Even under asylum you have a government issued ID.

I think people understand what voting is. Either they come from countries where voting counted or they come from countries where their vote didn’t count and they value that. Sure some don’t get involved in politics, same with citizens born in America.

I can’t speak for where you live, but like I said, when my husband walked out of the doors of becoming a new citizen there were tables set up for him to register to vote, and people there can answer questions. The young people in the communities help the older people with reading English printed materials. If they are registered they will receive in the mail their voting location. We can’t accomodate every language, but we can do our best to provide the opportunity for everyone to vote.

Since you commented on learning English to become a citizen I will add my two cents. Currently older people who have been here a certain amount of years do not need to speak English to become a citizen. My MIL will fall in this category and we are waiting another year to finally apply for her citizenship. She could have applied a couple years ago if she spoke English. I absolutely support letting older people become citizens without knowledge of the English language. I probably would reduce the age. I think it currently is something like 65 years old more or less, I would lower it to 50 if it were me. Younger than that I think people can and should and usually do learn the language enough to communicate on a basic level.

JLeslie's avatar

@muppetish Possibly they have done away with the physical exam, I am not sure. Here is the guide to becoming a citizen. If all you do is look at page 35 of the guide (not 35 of the pdf) you will see people becoming citizens already have multiple ID’s. I don’t expect you to read through the whole link, but I thought you might be interested to skim it.

It hink people forget that only citizens vote. It isn’t all legal immigrants. But, even so, all legal immigrants have ID’s. They have resident cards of some sort or another.

syz's avatar

In North Carolina, 70% of those taking advantage of early voting voted Democrat. As soon as the Supreme Court rolled back the Voting Rights Act, North Carolina severely limited early voting (along with other voting restrictions).

As if happens, Get Out the Vote efforts include pick up and delivery for individuals without their own transportation, most of them poor blacks. When you are organizing such a program, having days to transport people in a few vehicles works a lot better than just one day.

In 2012, there were 121 alleged cases of voter fraud in NC ( 0.00174 percent of the ballots). In North Carolina, the State Board of Elections reports that upwards of 500,000 people may not have a driver’s license or state issued ID card. For many of those folks, some who are homebound, poor, or without easy transportation, a photo ID is a hardship.

Should everyone have a photo ID? It certainly seems like it. But what’s better? To have as many of our populace voting, or risk disenfranchising possibly half a million people?

In North Carolina, between the gerrymandering of districts and the passing of backwards, destructive legislation, there is absolutely no doubt in my mind that racism plays a large part of what’s happening here.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@syz Sorry, I don’t buy that they can’t go get a photo id at some point before an election. You can find time in four years to save the $20, I’m sure.

Does anyone know if the mentally challenged or developmentally disabled can vote? Just curious.

syz's avatar

You miss the point. Can they? Yes. But this family is too busy trying to survive, and so will probably not vote. Finding a way to get that voter ID is going to be pretty low on their priorities.

Is the vote of someone with money more important than the vote of someone without?

JLeslie's avatar

I do think it is a hardship for some to get an ID. My aunt is homebound pretty much. She can go in a wheelchair with help to places, but she is in pain the whole time. If the DMV where she lives is not well organized that could be a true hardship. In TN in the county I lived in the DMV was horrific. Wait time was horrible, they really sucked. In FL you can make an appointment and they take you without much wait. I doubt there are many people without ID’s except the very elderly. So, why not just make an exception for people born before 1960. They can bring a birth certficate or some other ID. It’s really the elderly and disabled who are the most disadvantaged I think, not immigrants, not the poor who are aged 18–50.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@syz I live in rural Missouri, I’ve seen a lot worse, they have a roof and 4 walls.

@JLeslie Yeah, that’s a good idea. Surely the Democrats couldn’t con all the oldsters….(that’s just a little joke, I promise!)

syz's avatar

^ I can only goggle at the lack of compassion.

Seek's avatar

Don’t forget the homeless. It’s so ridiculously hard to get ID if you don’t have an address.

ragingloli's avatar

@Seek_Kolinahr
Based on personal observation, a trait shared by almost all conservatives.

JLeslie's avatar

@Seek_Kolinahr Now that was something I had overlooked. Great point.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@syz Why don’t you tell me what makes you think I lack compassion? Because I think 4 walls and a roof is more luxurious than living homeless under a bridge? Geesh, judge much?

bolwerk's avatar

We’ve gone centuries without requiring ids to vote, and suddenly it became an issue when Republikans started finding stealing elections appropriate. Voter id laws required creating a bogus crisis of voter fraud, which was never especially widespread. In the end, it conveniently prevents vulnerable people from voting. This is classic fascism, actually: frustrated, angry lower middle class types have their rage directed toward people more vulnerable than them.

But the point is less about stopping people from voting and more about cock swinging. The Democrats have no intention of helping the poor, and letting poor people vote has largely been nothing but a formality for at least a generation; it’s just that Republikans have no intention of not hurting the poor. No shit: a better name for the Democratic Party is its original name, the Republican Party. A better name for the Republikan Party would be the Suppression Party, because that’s their MO.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@bolwerk But why is that too much to ask? We get id’d for alcohol, tobacco, if we’re driving crazy the police id us, to pick up items at a pick up location, at the bank, etc… Why is a photo id such a big stinkin deal?

Tropical_Willie's avatar

@KNOWITALL I think you missed the point that the Republicans have figured out the people ( the ones that are not like them ), have a hard time getting ID.

Factors are:
Homeless
Speak another language other than English
Poor

They use to have poll taxes to keep ” those people ” from voting.

rojo's avatar

At this point in time any voter ID law that has been proposed is specifically designed to limit the voting of those who historically do not vote Republican.
The sad thing is, if this were not the case, I would be all for voter ID laws.

Yet further government interference from the people who campaign on the platform that there is too much government interference.

@KNOWITALL it is too much to ask because we do not need all the laws we presently have, let alone one that accomplishes nothing. Why not ask it another way? Why not ask why you have to have an ID to by alcohol, tobacco, or drive a car?

bolwerk's avatar

@KNOWITALL: it’s too much to ask because it, besides being pointless and often onerous, deprives people of a fundamental right. Affirmations have been good enough for two centuries.

In any case, I don’t agree with the state requiring ids for alcohol or tobacco either.

cheebdragon's avatar

Who was being suppressed? The people who never leave their home to do anything in society? Huge fucking loss, I’m sure.

glacial's avatar

@cheebdragon You’re right. It’s about time someone took away their right to representation.

cheebdragon's avatar

The people who have never mailed or recieved a package, driven a car, cashed a check, opened a bank account, entered a bar, applied for government assistance, had a job, recieved a tax return, picked up a child early from school, bought cigarettes, purchased a lighter, returned an item a store, purchased or rented a home, apartment or vehicle, traveled on an airplane, been summoned for jury duty, entered a federal building, enrolled in a school or college, purchased spray paint, been to a doctors office, picked up a prescription from a pharmacy, applied for credit, had a child, visited a hospital, adopted an animal, taken a pet to the vet, and has never donated blood in their entire life…...you can not honestly tell me that you know someone who hasnt done any of that shit at some point in the past 5 years. So please explain to me who the flying fuck is being suppressed?

bolwerk's avatar

People shouldn’t vote unless they’ve purchased spray paint or cigarettes? I’m usually pretty good at penetrating people’s nonsense, but I have to admit I have no fucking clue WTF @cheebdragon is getting at.

glacial's avatar

@cheebdragon How about this Texas judge for starters? She was flagged for voter fraud because new id laws deemed that her driver’s licence listed her maiden name as her middle name. The laws were changed just before advance polling – that is nothing but a trap designed to keep people from voting. There can be no legitimate excuse for it. There is, however, a reason. It was given by the now unemployed man in the video @ragingloli posted.

cheebdragon's avatar

@belwerk Life must be so hard for you, bless your heart….
You dont need to purchase cigarettes to vote, but you do have to be 18.

cheebdragon's avatar

@glacial 1, 2 or 3 years notice that you need to get an ID to vote wasn’t long enough? Really?

glacial's avatar

@cheebdragon Did you read the article?
“The law kicked in on Tuesday as early voting in Texas’ November 5 election began.”

Not quite three years’ notice, though I can see how three years can easily be confused with three days.

bolwerk's avatar

@cheebdragon: so you’re saying there is a major problem with under age voting and therefore we need to ask 60somethings for their id?

cheebdragon's avatar

The law kicked in after years of highly publicized debate and extensive media coverage on every news network in the United States. I “almost” won $700 playing bingo yesterday (coincidently, something I had to show ID for)....the judge was “almost” blocked from voting? Well, I “almost” feel her pain, damn suppression!

I’m sure this lady can vote for her, several times.

cheebdragon's avatar

@Bolwerk Do I need to draw pictures for you? Sign language? Braille? I’m saying that if you live in the United States, there is no valid reason for you to not have an ID since its already required for some of the most menial tasks in life, but you draw the line at something as important as voting? I call bullshit, unless you want to rally against showing ID for anything else, I just can’t take you seriously.

Seek's avatar

Not having identification papers, not having an address, not having transportation to the DMV… there are many people without photo ID.

bolwerk's avatar

@cheebdragon: um, plenty of people don’t have IDs, often because they don’t travel and don’t drive. This is especially true of young people, poor people, and urban populations. You need to do a little better than hurr, we should require IDs to vote because most people have one. Especially when the topic is a basic human right to enfranchisement.

Here’s a valid reason for not having an ID: not wanting one.

JLeslie's avatar

@bolwerk I guess not wanting to work also.

cheebdragon's avatar

@bolwerk Right, the young and poor people without jobs, homes, bus passes, library cards, who don’t have cell phones or utility bills, and do not go to college, they don’t see doctors, have never visited planned parenthood, never purchased cold medicine, and have never applied for anything anywhere…...but they are regular voters? They must be pretty well informed on current events, what with not having an Internet or cable service provider…(I can see why you would assume they would be democrats)….where was the requirement to have ID to purchase firearms and ammunition in the constitution….I can’t seem to find it.

Seek's avatar

I think you seriously overestimate the labor market in its diligence toward paperwork, and overestimate the diligence of cashiers. I look about 16 most of the time, and I’m hardly ever carded for anything.

The fact is that as citizens, they have the right to vote until that right is taken away due to conviction. You don’t have to like who they vote for or the reason they are voting.

There it’s no law stating a citizen must be well informed to vote. I personally wish there were a law stating that amendments in the ballot be written in plain fucking English (Spanish, Creole, French, Chinese, and Tagalog) but at this point even i have a hard time working out what the hell they say.

By the way, last presidential election happened about two weeks after I had moved house. To late to change voter registration, but past the point in need a new ID. If an ID match were required, my working, card carrying, tax paying, well informed self world have been turned away.

bolwerk's avatar

@cheebdragon: why does it matter if they’re regular voters? Why does it matter if they’re smart or stupid or anything else? None of that gives anyone the right to disenfranchise them.

I can tell by your comments that you’re not very well-informed about constitutional law, maybe from listening to too much cable TV. Should you be disenfranchised?

rojo's avatar

How come here in Texas I have to register to vote but not to own a goddam gun?

cheebdragon's avatar

@Bolwerk CNN is disenfranchising? Maybe you should look up “disenfranchise” in the dictionary, think that through one more time and get back to me when you understand what you are saying. I didn’t say that anyone was stupid, I said they were probably uninformed. Personally, I feel like its ignorant for anyone to vote if they dont know anything about politics.

bolwerk's avatar

@cheebdragon: Your comments are looking really muddled again. Where did I say CNN is “disenfranchisng”? CNN may promote ignorance, but I don’t even see where I said that.

Yes, being ignorant of politics may be bad, but voting is still a fundamental right no matter how ignorant you are. And if you get most of your information from TV news, you’re pretty certain to be pig ignorant or, even worse, having your melonhead brimming with misinformation. That’s true whether or not you have a state issued ID.

SecondHandStoke's avatar

There might have been some effect of suppression but that isn’t the law’s intent.

It doesn’t take a genius to understand the importance of voting rights being restricted to those that are properly eligible.

Seek's avatar

^ Define “properly eligible”?

SecondHandStoke's avatar

First and foremost the status of citizen.

ragingloli's avatar

There might have been some effect of suppression but that isn’t the law’s intent.
Yes, it IS the law’s intent.
The fucker even admitted that there was almost no voter fraud before, so the claim that the law is about preventing said negligible voter fraud is a bold faced lie.

SecondHandStoke's avatar

^The intent of the law is to suppress voting by those not eligible.

So no one that has the right to vote has anything to worry about.

I should have said “It’s the intent of the law to suppress voting in the eyes of those, that for some inexplicable reason, see no purpose in having American Constitutional rights be restricted to it’s citizens.”

“Voter Suppression” is the sign on one of the many doors leading into the Room of Illegal Alien Debate.

SecondHandStoke's avatar

To put it more simply:

It’s not voter suppression,

It’s non voter suppression.

bolwerk's avatar

The intent is to make it difficult and inconvenient to vote. It has yet to be shown that it prevents any fraudulent voting.

SecondHandStoke's avatar

I voted yesterday.

It wasn’t difficult or inconvenient.

Also: If one is too lazy to vote I probably wouldn’t want the candidate that panders to them in office anyway.

bolwerk's avatar

What is this muddled shit? People are trying to vote and being denied. That is not indicative of being “too lazy to vote.” It is indicative of suppression.

SecondHandStoke's avatar

@bolwerk

To you knowledge why are they being denied?

Seek's avatar

They’re brown?
They have an accent?
They have an outdated address on their voting registration?
They are homeless and cannot afford identification?

I’ve personally witnessed actual citizens being put into “Provisional Ballot” lines during the last Presidential election for all of these reasons.

One of my workmates, a white dude named Gage, was handed a pamphlet in Spanish and stuck in the provisional line – without being given a reason.

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