General Question

Yellowdog's avatar

Since the English and Dutch cultures are relatively open minded and free of prejudice, how did apartheid gain such a foothold in South Africa?

Asked by Yellowdog (6781points) 2 weeks ago

Current politics / times aside…

Throughout most of the 20th century, South Africa was horribly divided by race. I realize that the situation in South Africa was further complicated by the threat of communism (the ANC), and acts of terror from both sides—but most of the white South Africans I have met were actually quite liberal.

England and Holland have been, throughout history, pretty tolerant and open minded havens for all people, even dissident groups, even religious minorities—and are among the most open minded cultures in the world today.

So, why did South Africa, with its English and Dutch background, become so apartheid?

Other English, Dutch, and similar European colonies had similar situations. But South Africa’s racial problems extended into comparatively modern times.

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

3 Answers

noitall's avatar

Who says they were? Those cultures have a long history of slave capturing and trading, plus ruthless and cruel—even murderous—exploitation of peoples in their occupations, trading hegemonies, and colonies! Sure, after the 20th century’s World War II, with, for example, the UK’s complete withdrawal (some call it abandonment, from the way they went about it starting in the previous century), they’ve had more convincing bragging rights about their ‘liberalism’. But that’s pretty darn recent.

Darth_Algar's avatar

Because South Africa isn’t England or the Netherlands, no matter the ancestry of its white population, and has its own culture and issues.

LostInParadise's avatar

Not to excuse them, but they were conquerors and, at least at the beginning, must have faced opposition. It is one thing to allow minorities to assimilate, and another to make your culture the dominant one where you are the minority.

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.

This question is in the General Section. Responses must be helpful and on-topic.

Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther