General Question

2late2be's avatar

What foods should I avoid while breast feeding? Also, is it ok if I stop breast feeding my baby girl? She doesn't seem very interested...

Asked by 2late2be (2286points) March 19th, 2009 from iPhone

I know that breast fed is the best for her, but she looks like doesn’t care about it, and I know this is something I should ask to the doctor , I just want some advices. Thank you all.

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42 Answers

shilolo's avatar

Here is some useful information from the La Leche League, in English and Spanish. You might want to find a breastfeeding (lactation) consultant near you that can help encourage you and your baby to make it work. Alternatively, the La Leche League (I believe) has a phone number you can call for advice.

casheroo's avatar

What do you mean she doesn’t seem interested? Is she not hungry? Is she having issues latching?
There are really no foods you should avoid while breastfeeding. This site kellymom is a GREAT breastfeeding support site. That link takes you to exactly what you asked about which foods to avoid. Here’s a snipet:
Is there a list of foods that I should avoid while breastfeeding?
There are NO foods that a mother should avoid simply because she is breastfeeding. It is generally recommended that you eat whatever you like, whenever you like, in the amounts that you like and continue to do this unless you notice an obvious reaction in your baby to a particular food. There is no such thing as a “LIST OF FOODS THAT BREASTFEEDING MOTHERS SHOULD NOT EAT” because most nursing moms can eat anything they want, and because the babies who are sensitive to certain foods are each unique – what bothers one may not bother another. If you have a family history of allergies, you might want to avoid certain foods (for example, peanuts or dairy), but again, this would be different for every child.

SpatzieLover's avatar

Ohhhh, I made a PACT with myself one MONTH…then decide if it was/wasn’t working out. It’s WAY too early to throw in the towel. My son & I didn’t become experts until around week 3 or 4.

Please, for your precious girl’s health be patient, sit with a nice glass of water, relax with your feet up and TRY again. Find a nice movie you want to watch. Put it on, take off your shirt and be calm.

SpatzieLover's avatar

She’ll care when she’s 5 to 10 IQ points above in school! ;D

2late2be's avatar

It’s not that she’s not hungry, she always is! She drinks 6 oz. But she gets angry when I put her on my breast until I give the bottle, she only stays on each breast for like 10 each maybe, and about the foods I’m talking about spicy foods, I love spicy foods and I’d like to eat some chips with lots of hot sauce!

SpatzieLover's avatar

No. No bottle now. Get it out of your mind. Give the breast the best try. She needs constant breast feedings.

Unless you absolutely DON’T have time to sit and be calm with her, stick with it.

janbb's avatar

If you can keep breastfeeding for 3 months or more, it’s great for the baby’s immune system but don’t make her or yourself miserable. Check out the breastfeeding websistes, talk to your doctor and see if you diagnose what the problem is. I heard recently of a baby who cried constantly on formula until the doctor found one the he could tolerate so switching to formula is not necessarily an easier way to go.

Just read your most recent post – I wouldn’t be giving a bottle until you have a good breastfeeding routine going. The bottle may be easier for her and that’s why she’s giving up on the breast.

Hang in there both of you – it’s early days yet!

casheroo's avatar

@2late2be Are you supplementing with formula in the bottle, or are you pumping?
I was unable to breastfeed, because I began having to supplement with formula (terrible, terrible advice from the hospital) and drinking from a bottle is much easier than latching and working for the milk to come out of the breast. Your daughter may be getting “lazy” when it comes to feeding.
If you need to bottle feed because of going back to work, I understand.
But if you want to breastfeed, I urge you to only breast feed on demand, and not offer a bottle at all. Only for the first six weeks. It helps with nipple confusion.

As for the spicy food, the only way to find out if your little one has a problem with it, is to eat it and see how she reacts. It is possible she may get gassy or poop more, but it does not harm them. Read the link I sent you. It’s full of all the breastfeeding information you could possibly need!

casheroo's avatar

Also, she is only a couple days old, and dirnking 6oz in one sitting??! I’ve never heard of such a thing. When we would make bottles, of my breastmilk or formula, our son could not have more than 1–2oz, and that lasted at least a couple weeks. They slowly need to intake more milk.
Are you assuming she’s ingesting 6oz because she’s nursing for so long? She might be working past your foremilk, to get to your hindmilk. It takes long nursing session sometimes. Just be patient.

SpatzieLover's avatar

BTW~ I thought I’d HATE breastfeeding. I rec’d a lot of moral support from my husband, but NOT my mom. (she gave us formula only——my sis & I have THE worst allergies in our family, too——coincidence? I think not.)

After the first month, I could HONESTLY say, I LOVED breast feeding. It was a true bonding time for my son & I. We could just sit and quietly enjoy each other’s company. he had only one mild cold during the winter…then RIGHT as I started weaning, he got a horrendous cold…so I extended feeding him until 14 mos old (his b-day’s in July so a cold is rare!).

I was sad when he was done :( And, never thought I’d have felt that way.

Even my husband admired the bond we had and STILL loves the fact that once our son has “skin” contact from one of us, he calms right down. (A hand on his knee/holding hands-etc)

SpatzieLover's avatar

@casheroo I agree 6oz is WAY too much and a great way to create obesity. My mom also fed me way too much formula. Not GOOD!

Aethelwine's avatar

Don’t give up so soon. Breastfeeding is a wonderful experience, good for both of you and easy on the wallet. I breastfed all three of my children, the longest being 15 months. It can be frustrating at first, but it’s worth it once the two of you get used to it. Just be patient.

2late2be's avatar

@SpatzieLover the doctor told me that 4–5 oz were good for her because she’s a big girl (9 lb 5 oz) she keeps crying if I only give her 3 oz or less..

shilolo's avatar

@2late2be I think you misunderstand. The answer is not less formula, it is NO FORMULA. The crying may be difficult to tolerate, but she’ll quickly learn that it is either breast milk or nothing.

casheroo's avatar

Okay, I’m not really comprehending how a newborn could possibly eat the amount that my over three month old would have been eating. Just because she weighs more does not mean she needs an excessive amount of breastmilk. Is she spitting up at all after feedings?
Here, read this: http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/enough-milk.html

janbb's avatar

If you are breastfeeding on demand and only breastfeeding, you will not know how many ounces she is taking, but she should be getting what she needs because she is feeding when she needs it.

2late2be's avatar

@casheroo she doesn’t spit at all, she eats and burps normally.

Jack79's avatar

1. are we talking about a newborn here? (from the quantities of milk, I assume we are).

2. Irrelevant: is that her in the pic? cute :)

3. I couldn’t breastfeed either, but that’s because I’m a man. LOL :P

4. My daughter obviously had to use the bottle (her mother reappeared in our lives when she ran out of money 14 months later). She’s an above-average healthy 4-year-old girl who still cannot count, but can do everything else. You’d never believe she’s just 4 when she starts talking about Astronomy, Ancient History or Mythology. And she speaks 4 languages. So your kid is not going to be stupid or anything if you stop breastfeeding. The doctor actually insisted that formulas nowadays are even better than milk (in terms of substance) and that you should supplement anyway, even if you can breastfeed.

5. Having said that, the main reason for breastfeeding is not nutritional. Having your child in your arms (and in your case also giving her part of your body) strengthens the bond between you, and offers her security and love. Things that are just as tangible (and even more vital) to a baby. Hugs are extremely important in the first few years of someone’s life. Luckily, my daughter got that from me, even though I was not a woman. And I honestly believe she didn’t miss out on anything (at least seeing how she’s been growing so far).

6. You should not stop breastfeeding unless you really have to.

7. Most foods are ok (even spicy ones) as long as you don’t drink alcohol or smoke or something. I’d also avoid coffee if possible. Generally, a well-balanced diet with plenty of vitamins and calcium is best for both you and your child. But don’t worry about it all that much. You eating the odd hamburger once a month won’t harm her.

8. All questions are best answered by a doctor. All we’re sharing here is our own experience, but each case is different, so what may have worked for one child does not necessarily work for others. I for example was very much against dummies (soothers, pacifiers or whatever they’re called), but found out that my daughter really needed them, it helped her sleep and breathe better. And it was a lot better than sucking on her thumb like some other children do (including myself at that age). So find out what works best for your own kid. And don’t be afraid to make mistakes, kids are pretty tough, all they really need is love, and it all works out fine in the end :)

miasmom's avatar

I agree with the others, the bottle is obviously confusing and easier, so that’s probably why she wants it.

Breastfeeding takes time and patience, but so worth it! I never got to breastfeed my little one and I wish the NICU staff would have worked with me more on that, but it is what it is. I would encourage you to drop the bottle and set up a feeding schedule, every 3 hours and give it a few days, but most babies will adjust and do well on that kind of schedule.

SuperMouse's avatar

How old is your baby? Isn’t she less than a week? Has your milk even come in yet? If it hasn’t that could explain why she prefers the bottle. But even if your milk hasn’t come in she needs to keep latching and eating and she is getting plenty of nutrition from the colostrum. Please try to be patient and be sure she has a latch that is comfortable for the both of you. If she isn’t latched properly she won’t get enough milk.

casheroo's avatar

@Jack79 Okay, I mainly formula fed, and I’m not bashing you..but point 4. where you say doctors encourage formula over breastfeeding is fucking ridiculous. I would have gotten a new pediatrician. It’s not just for the bond, it’s for the immune factors
I don’t think children’s who’s mother’s don’t breastfeed “miss out” on anything. We still did skin-to-skin contact, my husband did it also. It can help bond any child to their parent.
Also, formulas nowadays aren’t exactly the best stuff

2late2be's avatar

@SuperMouse my baby will be 1 week this Friday morning, I do have milk already, I tried 10 minutes ago, she was like 15 minutes on both sides, but still wanted the bottle… 

miasmom's avatar

@casheroo is right on, formula tries very hard to replicate breastmilk, but it still isn’t the same, breastmilk is by far the best for a baby, if possible. It is gentle on their tummies and it builds up their immune system. I pumped and produced very little milk for my daughter and we had to supplement with formula and her tummy had such a hard time with it that we ended up on a very expensive hypoallergenic formula, she had no problems with my breast milk because it is designed for her, my best friend also had a newborn at the time and when we came home from the hospital, she pumped milk for my daughter and I can’t tell you how grateful I was.

@2late2be You need to not give her the bottle at all because it is confusing her and keep being persistant, wait 3 hours and try again.

SpatzieLover's avatar

@2late2be Why were you giving her the bottle to begin with (did I miss something?) ? And not just feeding her more frequently. It’s COMMON to take up to 30 mins per side. I have my 1st year breast feeding journal fairly handy…

The first weeks were filled with constant feedings.

SuperMouse's avatar

@2late2be please call the Le Leche League, or at the very least the lactation consultant from the hospital where you gave birth before giving up. If you can be successful you will be glad you did. I promise.

How often is she nursing? Are you feeling let down?

2late2be's avatar

@SuperMouse She’s been feeding every 3–4 hours average.

SpatzieLover's avatar

@2late2be that’s a LOooooong time between feedings for a week old baby. 2hrs tops.

miasmom's avatar

@2late2be you could try pumping also after you feed her to try to increase your supply, but I totally agree with @SuperMouse you should contact a lactation consultant because they can see if she is latching properly, etc and help you work through this in person.

SpatzieLover's avatar

@miasmom Good Idea! That’s (pumping) what I did to discover what exactly I was producing. I did it the second week and discovered one side produced 75% more consistently. So, I always started on the “slow” side, then went back to it if I felt it filling before my son was done on the fast side.

And, I’m with everyone that mentioned calling in a lactation consultant. It sounds to me like maybe your doctor isn’t on the breast feeding wagon.

miasmom's avatar

2–3 hours is a good time frame, but don’t go any longer than 3 hours between feeding and if your milk isn’t fully in yet, then 2 hours is probably more appropriate.

The important thing is for her to drain each breast completely because that is what tells your body to produce more milk.

bananafish's avatar

Real quick, I’d like to say to 2late2be….don’t let mothers scare you into being afraid of formula.

Breast feeding is the best option. But nowadays, formula feeding is just the tiniest step down. Formula is very healthy and is now made with DHA and ARA – important ingredients that help formula to very closely mimic breastmilk.

@SpatzieLover, you know I love you, but I RESENT the comment that children who eat formula instead of breastmilk have lower IQs.

Any studies that do show a difference are specious, because they don’t account for the fact that ill babies, troubled babies, and adopted babies (some of which come from mothers who didn’t care for baby in womb) are largely formula drinkers. This skews the results.

Formula being a grossly inferior product is a spook story that stems from the 50s-70s. Modern formula is safe, healthy, and builds amazing brain power.

For the record, I was on the “breast feeding bandwagon” 100% when my girl was born. I tried to breastfeed until my nipples bled and my baby was starving. My equipment failed me, and as a result I made the very tough decision for my baby’s health and my mental stability to switch to formula when she was one week old.

I cried for days on end, sobbing uncontrollably because of moms like you who shout “LOW IQs!” and “UNHEALTHY!” and “MALNOURISHMENT!”

My baby drank formula for a solid year, and today she is a thriving, healthy, big baby. And she is SMART. scary smart. Stewie Griffin smart.

And I am now a vocal advocate for moms not to be BULLIED into breastfeeding when it doesn’t work out for them.

@2late2be, try to breastfeed as long as you and your baby feel comfortable and hopeful. If it is tearing you apart, or if your baby is suffering, understand that formula is a healthy, wonderful alternative that will still provide your baby with all the building blocks to be strong, smart as a whip, and happy.

Don’t let the mob scare you.

bananafish's avatar

guess that wasn’t quick…

casheroo's avatar

@bananafish I wasn’t trying to gang up on 2late2be. As I stated in my posts, I myself formula fed..
I choose to ignore the whole IQ comments, because I’ve been over that debate so many times with mothers. Don’t let it get to you. But, I do know where you are coming from with your defensive comments.

bananafish's avatar

I know casheroo, this is not just an issue on this board. It’s an issue I hit face-first with other moms all the time.

I want to volunteer to drive my wild toddler over to any die-hard breastfeeders house and say, “HERE! Here’s a formula baby. You babysit for an hour…or eight or nine…and once she’s done picking your locks, running your electronics, and luring you into traps…then you tell me she’s missing some IQ points.” lol

bananafish's avatar

But in fairness casheroo, after reading your comment about formula being “not exactly the best stuff”...you linked to an article about product recalls. It’s scary contamination of a handful of brands. But this same type of contamination can be found in peanut butter, all forms of nut bars, granola, ice cream, etc. I don’t think you can rate the quality of the products based on a recall such as this.

Again, that’s making a generalization about formula-fed babies.

casheroo's avatar

bananafish, did you even read the article? It’s about melamine in our children’s formula. And you consider that better than breastmilk? It was in pretty much all the major formulas. The formulas were NOT recalled…they were in China, because they were killing babies, but not in the US. The US hardly flinches at recalls it seems. Cribs have to kill multiple kids before they do anything…practically every item we bought in 2007 was recalled because it could have killed our son.
Back to the formula, here’s an article on the DHA and ARA in infant formula. It’s just scary that big businesses are controlling what goes into our children’s formula. I think they need to regulate it a lot more, and make sure it’s 100% safe for our children. I had issues breastfeeding, and I worry I’ll have them when we have another, I would like a healthy alternative to breastmilk..but there really doesn’t seem like there is one.

bananafish's avatar

Wow, you’re just fishing in a hold different pond out there, aren’t ya? I’ll be happy to talk FDA regulations and Chinese factory problems on another board, this is about child development, not recalls or batch contamination. Go to Krogers right now. That formula on the shelves is safe. And feeding it to your baby will grow a smart, robust, happy kid.

If you’re going to panic over recalls, I hope you stay true to form and never feed your child any peanut butter sandwiches or nut-based products at any point in their lives. I’d also avoid green onions, spinach, beef, or tomatoes. And then wrap them in a bubble.

And that’s where I take my leave of this gangpile. Enjoy stroking eachother.

casheroo's avatar

Panic over recalls? Of course I’m going to be upset that the crib we bought just happens to have been one of the millions listed in the recall. Wouldn’t you be upset, after using a product, to learn that it could have resulted in the death of your child…a completely preventable death?
What I was saying about the formula is, in China it was recalled for killing children, once they learned it was the cause of death for multiple newborns. The FDA here basically said they don’t know how much is safe, but since it’s such a small amount in the formula..then it must be okay.
You seem to be justifying your formula feeding a lot. How young if your child? I’m assuming younger than mine, I used to be like you.

Aethelwine's avatar

No one is pressuring her to breastfeed. Her baby is only one week old and she is confusing it by introducing the bottle so soon, then wonders why her baby is having trouble. Breastfeeding is best for the baby and she just needs to be patient. When a baby is that young, it’s not uncommon to breastfeed every two hours. It just sounds like 2late2be is uninformed and needs some direction on how to breastfeed.

Of course she should switch to formula if she is having difficulties, but to give up after just one week?

Jack79's avatar

But then again…don’t listen to us. Talk to a doctor.

mamabeverley's avatar

Hey you all… just chill. I think we are getting off track here. We all know that breastfeeding is best for our child. But, I will tell you from personal experience that sometimes it is not possible. Let me tell you a story. When I had my son by c-section, I was very sick. My blood pressure was sky high (207/176) I had gestational diabetes, and I got some funky thing called super ventricrial tachtacardia, with premature ventricular contractions, when not medicated caused my heart to beat at 241 beats per minute. I was on enough digitalis to kill a horse. I was on 6 BP pills a day, was on full bed rest at month 3. I made it to 8 months exactly, then had a c-section. The magnisium sulfate the IV’d into to lower my bloodpressure so I could survive my c-section caused my son, now thankfully alive to flat line, and be recessutated. The first time I held him, he was hooked up to 3 beeping machines to regulate everything.

The first time the nurse brought him in to me to feed him after he was disconected from everything, I told her I need a bottle. She proceded to YELL at me, and lecture me about how I was harming my baby by being a wuss and not breastfeeding. I told her she better read the G.D. chart again because unless she wanted me to kill my baby, I could not breast feed. I feel 2late2be’s issues, and there is a lot of hostility going on here. It takes a long time to get things just right. Just do what is right for you. You do have a very big baby, and she is naturally going to need more than 2–3 oz right now. Do not worry about having a fat baby. My goodness, she is not even a week old. Do we have to worry about obesity already? My son was just shy of 7 lbs and he was a full 4 weeks early. He would have easliy been a 9+ pounder if he went full term. Don’t stress, it will come to you. You are not a bad mother if you don’t breastfeed. Just be glad you have a healthy baby.
Best wishes and congratulations on your bundle of joy!!
MB

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