Social Question

reijinni's avatar

Do you remember something that is true when you were 6 that is no longer true now?

Asked by reijinni (5359 points ) October 22nd, 2010

can you even remember that far back?

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

67 Answers

crisw's avatar

When I was 6, it was true that humans had walked on the moon only once. I remember that. I got to stay up to watch the first moon landing.

When I was 6, it was true that we were at war in Vietnam. I remember the nightly news and the POW bracelet my mother wore.

When I was 6, it was true that I was scared of hippies. Not any more :>D

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

Pluto was a planet and triceratops was a dinosaur.

anartist's avatar

The US pledge of alliegance did not include the words “under God.”

LuckyGuy's avatar

The Russians were winning the space race.
In the year 2000 we all will have flying cars.

Aster's avatar

deleted by me.

JilltheTooth's avatar

Dinosaurs were depicted as dragging their tails. (That never made sense to me).
Humans had never set foot on the moon.

IchtheosaurusRex's avatar

We had 9 planets in the solar system.
No one knew what the far side of the moon looked like.
There were 48 stars on the U.S. flag.
U.S. coins were made of silver.

crisw's avatar

Wow, we are an older bunch than I thought! Sometimes it seems like everyone else here is 14…

crazyivan's avatar

I was young.

Whitsoxdude's avatar

My mom knew everything.

Kayak8's avatar

When I was 6, girls had to wear dresses or skirts to PUBLIC school. You couldn’t wear “gym shoes” outside of PE class, your parents (and most of us had two) had to sign your report card every 6 weeks, and you wouldn’t have even thought about chewing gum at school. You called every other adult Mr. or Mrs. So-and-so and often didn’t even know their first names (or that they had first names).

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

When I was six I could water witch. Can’t now.

crisw's avatar

@Adirondackwannabe

is that like dowsing?

meiosis's avatar

Computers were the size of rooms

Gay meant happy

Television closed down for the night

Telephones were wall mounted

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

Ohh, I remember when TV went out for the night, too. I also remember when “cable” meant no commercials.

ucme's avatar

A Big Mac was a fat Scotsman…....or an oversized coat :¬)

Tropical_Willie's avatar

TV was in black and white, telephones had rotary dials and….. we were on a “party line” for the phone —- one long and one short.

downtide's avatar

British currency still included shillings, and there were 240 pence in the pound.

Cruiser's avatar

That Santa’s beard was real.

diavolobella's avatar

All phones had cords

You had to get up to change the TV channel and there were only 4 channels (ABC, NBC, CBS AND PBS)

If you wanted to cook food, you had to do it on the stove (no microwave)

Most people’s bikes only had coaster brakes

NBA teams wore short shorts instead of the long baggy ones they wear now

There were no video games, so we played outside with our friends all day until it got dark

Milk came in cardboard cartons

Most cars ran on leaded gas

Pied_Pfeffer's avatar

MTV only consisted of music videos, hip VJs, and maybe a commercial or two.

DrasticDreamer's avatar

Summer was a year long, and you didn’t have to do anything other than what you wanted to. Now it seems to have diminished horribly, and there’s a lot I have to do during it.

flutherother's avatar

Milk was delivered to your doorstep in glass bottles every morning
There were no supermarkets
Television aerials were X or H shaped and were huge
We walked to school
Patrick Moore was my hero…...........well, perhaps he still is.

aprilsimnel's avatar

This is what the adults around me thought when I was a kid:

We were going to be blown up by the Soviets.
Nixon would die in disgrace (He didn’t, and was revered as a statesman and astute political analyst before he died in 1994)
Ronald Reagan’s being Governor of California was a fluke. He’d never win another office.

weeveeship's avatar

Floppy Disks. ‘Nuff said.

crazyivan's avatar

@aprilsimnel You sure about Nixon there?

ucme's avatar

Broadband was something girls put in there hair :¬)

diavolobella's avatar

@crazyivan I thought the same thing.

crazyivan's avatar

He was a disgraced statesman when I was born, but I was unaware of his promotion.

llewis's avatar

It was safe for children to play outside by themselves, and to go to their friends’ houses several blocks away. We had time to lay outside in the grass and pick shapes out of clouds. We had time to play – not go to practice, but actually PLAY – games (and make up our own rules if need be). We’d stand up on the front seat (bench seat, not bucket) so we could see while riding in the car. I’d sometimes stick my head out of the window to feel the wind, until the day I swallowed a bug. Girls wore dresses with sashes, and white ankle socks and hard shoes to school.

aprilsimnel's avatar

@crazyivan and @diavolobella, yeah, I’m sure, because I remember being absolutely shocked to see him on TV all the time holding forth about international politics on shows like Face The Nation and Meet The Press from about 1990 until a few months before he died. He wasn’t completely rehabilitated, no, but he could get in where he fit in, and based on his China triumph of the early 70s, that was international stuff. He wasn’t hiding in the shadows, snarling at passers-by.

YARNLADY's avatar

Children played with toy guns and nobody complained.
We never heard of TV or computers
My first grade class learned how to dive under our desks in case of an atom bomb attack.

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

Gadzooks, @worriedguy They told me we’d have flying cars in 2001 liars!! When I was 6 the US never tortured people or violated their rights. When I was 6 the US Never attack anyone who did not attack us or our allies bah ha ha was that one shot all to hell.

Iclamae's avatar

To my child’s mind:

Internet?
(I don’t think I found out about it for another year or so, when my school set it up in their library. And then, Nick.com was the only thing to go to really.)

Microsoft paint was the most amazing thing about my dad’s PC. And Space Taxi was the most amazing thing about his Commodore 64. Ghostbusters was a close second.

When you draw a picture, the sky is separated from the ground by a blank space in between. You know, because the sky’s up there, not down here.

I’m going to be an artist when I grow up! And wear a funny hat and smock and paint with an easel.

Dogs eat cats and bones, cats eat mice and fish, mice eat cheese.

JilltheTooth's avatar

I guess @crisw is right…we are ,as a group, much older than I thought!

Brian1946's avatar

When I was 6:

There were no human-made objects orbiting the Earth.
I was living in Canada.
There was no Disneyland.
There was no Madonna.
Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, and the Big Bopper were alive.
Winston Churchill, Eisenhower, Einstein, JFK, and MLK Jr. were alive.
Rosa Parks was probably still riding in the back of the bus.
Black people in the some of the southern US states weren’t allowed to vote.
Polio vaccine wasn’t publicly available.
The Italian ocean liner, Andrea Doria was sailing the seas.
There were no movies featuring Clint Eastwood or Paul Newman.

Iclamae's avatar

Also, my $3 allowance was sweeeet. Even if the other kids got a $5 allowance and without having to do chores.

Jeruba's avatar

When I was 6, we liked Ike, sugar candy was ok because the dentist gave it to us for being good during our checkups, mothers stayed home, and you could mail a first-class letter for 3 cents U.S. postage.

FireMadeFlesh's avatar

When I was 6:
– I was in school.
– John Howard was our Prime Minister (just).
– I went to church.
– Petrol was about 80c per litre.
– I had never been to the city.
– The last state in Australia decriminalised homosexuality (okay, I don’t remember this one).
– We did not have a computer in the house.
– 18 people were killed in a landslide at Thredbo. One survived.
– I couldn’t reach the pedals in the car, but dad let me steer it around the lawn.

Blondesjon's avatar

Yeah. I was 6 years old, my mommy and daddy loved each other, and I had a full head of hair.

talljasperman's avatar

the Canadian food guide put meat on equal standing as fruits and vegetables

Nially_Bob's avatar

* Back to the Future II was an unquestionable depiction of the future.
* Everyone owned a yo-yo.
* I only knew one person who had the internet at his house and my friends and I came up with weird and wonderful ideas as to what the internet does. I think we concluded that it was some kind of friendly alien.
* We didn’t have a dishwasher to do the dishes and whenever my brothers and I complained about it my mum always said she already had several dishwashers (us).
* Girls were yucky [girls remain yucky]
* The lurgy was the single most deadly disease in human history.

I’m finding it difficult to discern whether I was very lucky or that people are exxaggerating but, being 20 years old, i’m part of the young generation and feel that the “it was safe to go outdoors etc” applied to me when I was 6. My friends and I used to play outside or at one anothers houses alot as did most the kids at my school, we would sometimes play video games or watch TV if we were being lazy or it was too hot/cold but playing in the neighborhood was the conventional thing and I grew up in a city.

desiree333's avatar

when I was six, Pluto was still a planet. :(

aprilsimnel's avatar

@desiree333 – Aw, I know, right? :(

desiree333's avatar

@aprilsimnel awww sad little picture, poor misunderstood Pluto :P

JilltheTooth's avatar

@desiree333 : It sure screwed up my mnemonic for remembering the order when they took Pluto away!

crazyivan's avatar

@JilltheTooth My Very Elderly Mother Just Served Us Nothing… still works, but it’s a little depressing now.

JilltheTooth's avatar

Mother Very Thoughtfully Made A Jelly Sandwich Under No…... No what? Used to be Protest…but now, alas…

Pied_Pfeffer's avatar

Gracious! Where did that mind wander off to when I posted MTV? I was 18!

At six, The Saturday Evening Post circulated their last magazine. I miss Norman Rockwell and his art.

MaekoPoisoning's avatar

When I was a child, Pluto was a planet.

desiree333's avatar

@Jillthetooth Wasn’t Pluto the last planet or something?

crazyivan's avatar

Pluto was never a planet any more than Apophis was a planet. When you were a child they were lying to you!

JilltheTooth's avatar

Well, @crazyivan , you deserve a poke in the snoot for saying such a thing and destroying my faith in…well…everything. Watch your back, my snoot-poker is armed and ready!

SundayKittens's avatar

WHAT HAPPPENEDD TO TRICERATOPS!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??!

crisw's avatar

@SundayKittens

It still was a dinosaur. It just may have been a baby dinosaur.

SundayKittens's avatar

First brontosaurus, now this? What is happening to this society??

downtide's avatar

Triceratops being a baby makes all kinds of sense, when you consider how many people make it their favourite dinosaur. Babies are cute. And that’s another weird thing. I can understand for survival reasons that humans would think human babies are cute. What’s the purpose of the same reaction to other species? Even ones we’ve never met before?

crisw's avatar

@downtide

It’s called neoteny. We tend to see as cute those features that are present in human babies- flat faces, big eyes, etc. That’s why we have pugs!

downtide's avatar

@crisw Thanks! I’ve not heard that term before.

crazyivan's avatar

In psychology that tendency is often referred to as the Kewpie Doll Effect. I was thinking about that last night as I looked at my cat. I though to myself, “who would have thought that being cute would be such an incredible survival mechanism?”

mattbrowne's avatar

That adults can’t grow new brain cells.

crazyivan's avatar

@mattbrowne Unless there are new findings I’m not aware of, that isn’t true. While it was held as canon for a long time, more recent studies have shown that we continue to add new brain cells and neuronal connections throughout our lives.

If I’m wrong on this, please direct me to a more up-to-date source.

mattbrowne's avatar

Try this

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurogenesis#Adult_neurogenesis

“New neurons are continually born throughout adulthood in predominantly two regions of the brain. Many of the newborn cells die shortly after they are born, but a number of them become functionally integrated into the surrounding brain tissue. Adult neurogenesis is an example of a long-held scientific theory being overturned.”

peridot's avatar

At age 6, there wasn’t a thing wrong with playing softball in the middle of the street. Neither we nor the cars along both sides were considered to be in any danger. We rode bikes without helmets, and never went too far away to hear Mom call us in for dinner.

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.
Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther