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PriceisRightx26's avatar

What foods contain cow?

Asked by PriceisRightx26 (267 points ) 3 weeks ago

I’d like to cut beef out of my diet entirely. The cons of eating cow definitely outweigh the benefits. I have no intentions of going completely vegetarian or vegan. I understand that this question seems like it should produce a really obvious answer, but we all know that the world today doesn’t actually work like that. So, if you’re aware of any sneaky foods that contain beef, leave a note.

Thanks in advance!

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25 Answers

talljasperman's avatar

Taco bell’s ground beef,. Some types of Lard.

zenvelo's avatar

It’s a lot less than it used to be before mad cow. Altoids were made with beef tallow, McDonald’s Fries were coked in beef tallow.

So check foods with gelatin, much of that comes from beef bones. Also, just about any sausage or cured meat may have beef to augment pork. Check any soups to see if they were cooked in beef broth (such as Campbell’s Pepper Pot Soup).

Dutchess_III's avatar

Why cow? Why not pork instead?

snowberry's avatar

@PriceisRightx26 What exactly are your problems with “cow”? Why not call it “beef” instead? Is it concerns about mad cow disease? Conventionally grown beef has lots of problems other than the risk of mad cow disease. They raise these animals on antibiotics, and there is a residue in the meat. The animals aren’t as healthy as grass fed (no antibiotics, no rBST) or organically raised meats. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bovine_somatotropinGrass fed and organically raised animals won’t ever have a problem with mad cow disease.

PriceisRightx26's avatar

@snowberry, my concern is not with BSE. However, I am concerned about the antibiotic usage, as well as other environmental factors (I’m aware that this issues stems far and wide, beyond cows).

@Dutchess_III, I, more often than not, buy locally raised (“organic”) pork. This is not the case with cattle.

In all actuality, should just cut all of it out completely. I really don’t have the will-power for that, though. haha. I come from a “meat and potatoes” background. I’m weak :p

PriceisRightx26's avatar

This might be a bit doltish of me, but is BSE still a threat today?

ibstubro's avatar

In my opinion, eliminating a single food from your diet is coin a term “Life cost prohibitive” unless there is a life threatening concern. Meaning that if a food isn’t going to impair you, completely eliminating it from your diet is going to rob your life of more time than simply eating it.

PriceisRightx26's avatar

@ibstubro Our eyes are on very, very different sized pictures.

Coloma's avatar

Well, cow often contains horse. lol
Most of you may know that Burger King UK fessed up to buying “beef” from horse meat suppliers recently and traces of horse meat were found in the beef. Gag!

zenvelo's avatar

@Coloma Always a neigh-sayer! :)

rojo's avatar

Pretty much anything with the word “beef” in it. Althought there is probably a fair amount of cat in it also.

Coloma's avatar

@zenvelo Horse laugh!

snowberry's avatar

@PriceisRightx26 Regarding packaging that so often says Raised without antibiotics or hormones: It’s rBST, not BSE. It’s the hormone given to dairy cows to make them produce more milk (see my link above). Once a dairy cow has finished its life producing milk, it’s slaughtered for hamburger etc. which is where the concern about “hormones in meat” comes in. It’s illegal to use growth hormones in any animals raised for food in the US. So it’s really stupid when you read on a package of chicken how it’s not got any hormones in it. They’re selling to an uneducated and uninformed public.

And as I said before, any meat that’s advertised as being “grass fed” is generally “raised without antibiotics”, and it says so on the package.

If you are still concerned (many people are you know), go to a farmer’s market, and talk to the people selling meat there. You can actually GO to their farm and see how their animals are raised. I’ve done it lots of times. There are also websites that have links, phone numbers, or addresses of farmers in your area that raise grass fed/no antibiotic animals or even organic. And again, you can usually go out and inspect the place yourself.

popothepope's avatar

Also watch out for food where it may be hidden (or at least not as obvious) in the ingredients. Many jellys, sweets/candies and biscuits contain bovine gelatine which is produced from all the unused bits of a cow (things we wouldn’t normally eat like eyes, tongue etc.)

talljasperman's avatar

Some hot dogs sneak In some beef… sometimes they are honest and call them all-beef hot dogs.

JLeslie's avatar

Marshmallows, jello, beef steak, beef ribs, beef broth, some vegetable soups have a beef broth.

Coloma's avatar

Ewww..marshmallows too? Well shit, that forever ruins my S’mores moments. haha

PriceisRightx26's avatar

@snowberry by ‘BSE’ I meant bovine spongiform encephalopathy, AKA mad cow.

Again, thanks for the responses!

JLeslie's avatar

@Coloma I vaguely remember there are vegan marshmallows. I don’t know how good they are, I never had one. I like mine in hot cocoa or plain and roasted/toasted over a fire. I’m not keen on the s’mores.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Went on a search for marshmallows and stumbled on here. Stay away from gelatin.

Interesting about marshmallows though.

Coloma's avatar

I actually haven’t made S’mores in a long time but I do like adding extra little miniature marshmallows to my rare, Rocky Road ice cream moments. If I’m going to go for that I like to make it extra rocky and add more walnuts and marshmallows. haha

ibstubro's avatar

Personally, if you concern is about antibiotic use, you’d be better to eliminate pork, in my opinion. Cows can’t really be factory farmed the way hogs are, and the abuse of the environment there is appalling. Criminal, again, in my opinion.

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