Social Question

Mimishu1995's avatar

What words or phrases do you think are being overused?

Asked by Mimishu1995 (18104points) October 30th, 2015

To the point that they lose their meaning and are even reduced to just something nice for the ears?

This question came to me when I saw someone using some very “stylish” words, but when I asked what they meant they were unable to explain, then came to the conclusion that the words were just “popular”.

Can words lose their meaning because they are used so many time?

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38 Answers

Seek's avatar

Epic:

adjective
1.
of, relating to, or characteristic of an epic or epics.
“England’s national epic poem Beowulf”
synonyms: heroic, long, grand, monumental, Homeric, Miltonian
“a traditional epic poem”

It does not mean, “somewhat interesting”, or “mildly cool”, or even “utterly bitchin’.”

ZEPHYRA's avatar

Like,

Arbitrary.

ucme's avatar

Awesome
Genius
Cockwangler

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

dichotomy
paradigm shift
outside the box
synergy
Red Pill

JLeslie's avatar

I say “super” a lot lately. Lol.

“Like” is used way to much, especially by young girls. I say it more than I want to.

marinelife's avatar

Do ya think?

weeveeship's avatar

Ironic.
The real definition is: happening in the opposite way to what is expected, and typically causing wry amusement because of this.

However, people just use “ironic” to mean “weird” or “strange.” Just because something is usual doesn’t make it ironic.

Pied_Pfeffer's avatar

“I”, “me”, and “my”.

ibstubro's avatar

“Kardashian” ^

SQUEEKY2's avatar

I hear no worryies all the freaking time.

JLeslie's avatar

I don’t like “no worries.” That reminds me of the expression “my bad.” I don’t like either of them.

“I take it personal” bothers me too, and I hear it a lot.

DrasticDreamer's avatar

“Awesome”, “totally”, “literally”. Not saying I don’t use any of them myself, but they’re definitely used a lot in general.

I say “no worries”, @JLeslie. It short and to the point when and if I’m trying to reassure someone that they haven’t done something to bother me.

Kardamom's avatar

Nome Sane? Listen to any interview with rappers, you’ll hear it. Do you know what I’m saying?

msh's avatar

Being disrespected… Acting disrespectfully.
We conversated…I hope you used protection.
BabyDaddy….There are the baby’s parents. Baby’s Pop. Baby’s Mom.
Baby’s usage of the English language sucks rocks.

ragingloli's avatar

family values

ucme's avatar

Mafia
Nazi
Ninja

Berserker's avatar

I hate it when people use big ass words just to say some small shit. I mean even people at NASA are probably like, yo bitch, pass the salt already.

JLeslie's avatar

@DrasticDreamer I think no worries originally came out of Australia, didn’t it? I might be wrong. I don’t know why I have that in my head. Hey, I use like too much and I don’t like when people use like too much. LOL. I’m certainly not going to hold using no worries against anyone. :)

You know what I also don’t like, when people use “smell” as a negative. “That smells bad to me,” when they are saying something doesn’t add up or is suspicious.

ibstubro's avatar

Extremist
Radical

I a word can be used to describe anything from a US presidential candidate to some that blows themselves up in a crowded market, it’s overused.

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

@Symbeline you are correct, but there will be technical jargon too. It’s more like: godammit the piece of shit marzel vanes are causing side fumbling in the cardinal grahme meters again. Can’t we just megger this bitch already and get some real fucking phase detractors up in here already?

msh's avatar

Actually the folks at NASA say pass the fucking sodium chloride.
Gosh, more technical jargen is just over my lil’ ole head, damnit all to fucking hell.
Better?
Happier?
Have a nice day!

msh's avatar

Terrorist.
Just substitute ‘dingleberry’.

Seek's avatar

Sometimes the tech jargon is a time saver.
NaCL/NaOH
“The base is under assault a salt”

ibstubro's avatar

“Have a blessed day.”

ibstubro's avatar

OBO
“I’m not going to give it away.”

Here’s how it works:
Sign – $1500, Or Best Offer
Offer – $1000
Reply – “I’m not going to just give it away!”

Seek's avatar

^ The people who OBO and mean it, however, are awesome. A fellow flea-market seller and I were talking, and turns out he purchased his home for $300. It belonged to some guy’s mom. The guy lived out of state, it was going to cost a bunch to fix it up for a major sale, and he said “Screw it, I just want it off my hands.” Listed it for $5000 OBO. My buddy offered him $300, and he said “Works for me!”

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

^ How often does that happen, I am betting not much.

Seek's avatar

Not much at all. But when it does it’s awesome.

ibstubro's avatar

NROR

No Reasonable Offer Rejected

What’s wrong with that?

Former norm in my area.

LostInParadise's avatar

If you are within the sound of my voice
Do advertisers still use that phrase?

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SQUEEKY2's avatar

No worries.

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