Social Question

josie's avatar

Can I keep a potted Wandering Jew in the garage over the winter?

Asked by josie (29796points) 1 month ago from iPhone

I don’t know plants for shit but I have hostas in pots on my patio and a nice looking Wandering Jew that I got in the spring in a pot on my front porch
I just found out the WJ is perennial but not frost resistant
I always put the hostas in the garage over winter
Is it ok to do the same with the wandering jew? Or do I have to keep it inside by a window?

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

31 Answers

janbb's avatar

Not if it’s drunk and mobile! Oy vey!

Dutchess_III's avatar

Not unless your garage is heated (also, where do you live?)
Find a place for them in your house. It’s a yearly ritual with me. They all come in. I don’t have near the plants I used to. However, I did acquire 3 new ones over the summer.
And of course they need sunlight like you need food. I think the wandering Jew does ok in lower levels of light though. It’s been years since I had one.

Dutchess_III's avatar

BTW, two of those plants, this (the plant that is sitting on the floor) and this one (the one on the right) came in a plant arrangement some one sent me when my mom died in 07. They were tiny tiny then.

lucillelucillelucille's avatar

It might not get the light that it needs not to mention being too cold out there unless you are in zone 9–11.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

My garage temp in NC does not go below freezing except right by the roller doors, I’ve over-wintered several plants, there are windows and I water them sparingly.

Dutchess_lll's avatar

I am very surprised to hear that Willy.

LadyMarissa's avatar

Depends on how cold it gets where you live & for how long!!! It’s a moderate winter here with only about 2 weeks of really cold weather most winters & my WJ died in the garage. The next winter I moved it inside & it didn’t seem to like my gas heat…died. After that, I gave up. I’d think that inside near a window would be safer than the garage. Then early spring when you begin to get the sunny warm days move it outside during the day & inside for the nights.

Dutchess_lll's avatar

One of the plants in my picture…the long philodendrulon, is the FIRST one I’ve managed to keep l alive in 40 years of plant tending. It was quite embarassing as it’s touted to be the easiest plant to grow!
But It’s been with me since last April. I started him from cuttings that I bummed off of two different friends who have beautiful philos.

sp on “philodendrun”....I don’t think it’s spelled right but spell check’s got nuttin

canidmajor's avatar

Philodendron

Dutchess_lll's avatar

Off by 1 letter. I’ll add it to my dictionary. Thanks.

Brian1946's avatar

My Firefox spellchecker marked “philodendrun” as a misspelling, and offered philodendron as the correct one.

Dutchess_lll's avatar

As I said I need to add it to my dictionary….but I have to download something on my phone which I don’t want to do.
I imagine my desktop would have caught it. I use Firefox on it. I don’t think I’m using Firefox on my phone.

Dutchess_lll's avatar

Is there a reason you don’t want to bring them into the house?

MrGrimm888's avatar

This is an interesting thread. I have recently been growing Wandering Jews. I live in a pretty warm place, so I don’t have a working strategy yet, for what to do with them, in a cold winter.
I know that I got them from my old house, and that they seem impervious, to almost any conditions. We had an actual snow storm, a couple years back. They survived/thrived, despite standing snow, for more than 2 weeks… I’ll be following this thread, to see what is recommended. But they seem to be one of the heartiest plants, I’ve ever seen…

Inspired_2write's avatar

In winter, they can survive a temperature of 45 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit but only for a short time; then they start to weaken and die. ... Zebrina pendula wandering Jew is slightly more cold-hardy, able to survive a dip below 32 degrees Fahrenheit for a short time.

Will Frost Kill a Wandering Jew? | Home Guides | SF Gate
https://homeguides.sfgate.com › frost-kill-wandering-jew-92495

Dutchess_III's avatar

philodendron<<< I’m on my desktop and spell check picked that up.

KNOWITALL's avatar

We bring them in for winter. My WJ is about 15 years old and gorgeous.

Dutchess_III's avatar

I need to get one of them. They are pretty cool.

My oldest plant is probably 40 or 50 years old.

lucillelucillelucille's avatar

@josie -I once had a sh!tload of grasshoppers hatch in my kitchen when I brought an outdoor plant inside to overwinter.
They were hopping around everywhere & much smaller than the adults which made it harder to annihilate them.
They freaked me out. Lol
Something to consider:Each egg pod contains 15 to 150 eggs, depending on the species. Normally a female grasshopper can lay up to 25 pods. The eggs remain underneath for about 10 months in autumn and winter before hatching into nymphs during spring or in the initial days of summer.

Dutchess_III's avatar

@josie… Is there any reason you don’t want to bring it into the house?

Dutchess_lll's avatar

Snow does not always = freezing temps @ MrGrimm888.

MrGrimm888's avatar

^Isn’t that why the water freezes?

Dutchess_lll's avatar

Snow gently freezes in the atmosphere but it can be 32 or 31 degrees on earth. Which is balmy in winter. That is not a hard freeze. But it IS just at freezing and just below so the snow sits. Doesn’t melt.

Dutchess_lll's avatar

A hard freeze means you set a cup of water out and it freezes solid in 15 minutes. That’s freaking cold.
Dad was an engineer so he was always showing us cool stuff like that.

MrGrimm888's avatar

Well. I can’t say I remember the temperatures, but frozen snow, sitting on the ground for weeks, and the plants still doing ok, tells me, that they can survive more than we think…

Dutchess_lll's avatar

Most house plants are tropical and their leaves and foliage are mostly water so…freeze bad.

MrGrimm888's avatar

Well. I won’t claim expertise, on plants, but the Wandering Jew, is a BMF. One of my old roommates, would cut them down to nothing, and they still came back stong. They seem to thrive in my local climate, regardless of the circumstances…

josie's avatar

Thanks for the heads up
On the other hand it might be a chance to use my “Bug-A-Salt” rifle
https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=bug+a+salt+3.0&view=detail&mid=A58ED09E24F58D20AD79A58ED09E24F58D20AD79&FORM=VIRE

lucillelucillelucille's avatar

@josie -That would work well on steaks too!

Response moderated (Spam)
Response moderated (Spam)

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.
Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther