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SergeantQueen's avatar

What should you do if your resting heart rate is too high?

Asked by SergeantQueen (10366points) 1 week ago

My heart rate was 96 at the doctors. I googled it and most everything I read said that is too high for my age (19).

I am not sure what that means though, none of the sites seemed to talk about that. I personally think it may have been from me being anxious because I was at the doctors because last time my heart rate was also high (like 92)

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14 Answers

jca2's avatar

What did the doctor say about it?

stanleybmanly's avatar

Well obviously you should begin by checking your pulse when you are not stressed. Check it frequently.

SergeantQueen's avatar

@jca2 Pretty much just “you need to work on this” and then started talking about something else and I got distracted and forgot to ask

Call_Me_Jay's avatar

You are right that the doctor’s office can cause that. My blood pressure actually drops in medical settings. When I was a kid I would pass out.

Luckily heart rate is about the easiest thing to check yourself at home.

“At the wrist, lightly press the index and middle fingers of one hand on the opposite wrist, just below the base of the thumb.
– or -
“At the neck, lightly press the side of the neck, just below your jawbone.

“Count the number of beats in 15 seconds, and multiply by four. That’s your heart rate.”

Harvard Health – Want to check our heart rate? Here’s how.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

@SergeantQueen What is your pulse right now ?

That is what you have to start doing is check it if has been high.

SergeantQueen's avatar

Okay I think I did it right, I got 84

Tropical_Willie's avatar

Still high !
Try breathing in through your nose slowly and out through your mouth. Do that for at least a minute (about 12 to 15 breathes) and try your pulse again. I’m trying to get you to slow down.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

My resting pulse is 58 to 70. That is naturally.

give_seek's avatar

If you can afford it, purchase a FitBit or similar fitness wearable. Look for something that tracks your resting heart rate over a 24 hour period and can create charts of your heart rate over time. Then you can take these trends to a cardiologist and discuss any implications. Stay on top of this. Your heart is important.

anniereborn's avatar

My pulse is normally in the 80s. (mind you I am 52 and quite overweight, but it’s been like that for at least 20 years). None of my docs have had concern about it.

anniereborn's avatar

Here is a link to what Mayo Clinic says. Normal resting heart rate is between 60–100 bpm.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/expert-answers/heart-rate/faq-20057979

Laura8888's avatar

Never heard that our heart rate is suppose to be a certain number at a certain age. But I’ve heard that 60 to 100 beats a minute is normal and that if it’s over 100 you should tell your doctor. What did your doctor say? Lots of people have a higher heart rate when they’re at the doctor. My blood pressure is higher there but lower when I go home. You were just feeling anxious. Do you drink coffee? I know caffeine can raise heart rate and blood pressure so be careful. I also heard that being even a little dehydrated can increase heart rate and b.p. So drink up your water. Try to relax and take deep breaths. If you feel your heart rate is still in the 90’s then tell your doctor. Sometimes we have to be tougher and make them listen. Tell your doctor you feel concerned and want to know what can be done about it. But I’m sure you’re okay. Some young people work out too much so be careful if you exercise. All that can raise your heart rate.

JLeslie's avatar

It could be normal for you. If you feel your heart racing or pounding it probably is not normal.

Did it recently get faster? Or, that has always been your resting heart rate?

Did he give you a blood test to check your thyroid? Are you already a thyroid patient?

Tropical_Willie's avatar

@JLeslie has good question, I had a thyroid episode almost 20 years ago; my numbers were so high they sent me to an endocrinologist that afternoon. Dr “K” saw me that afternoon, he took my B/P and pulse three times. B/P was 122/72 and my heart rate was 70. He said pulse should have been approaching 100 or more and my B/P was low by 25 on each for my thyroid numbers. 4 months later everything was back to normal.

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