General Question

troubleinharlem's avatar

Does this sentence make sense to you?

Asked by troubleinharlem (7976points) April 11th, 2010

“This way he would not have to stay suffering in the world without her – instead, he could be her, and she with him, forever.”

This sounds a bit off – I read it in an essay about Wuthering Heights, and I’m supposed to give a suggestion about what it should be, but I can’t think of anything. What should it be?

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14 Answers

jaytkay's avatar

Is it missing a “with”?

nimarka1's avatar

“he could be her”? thats the part that doesnt make any sense.

troubleinharlem's avatar

@nimarka1 – THAT’S IT. Agh, I’m so brain-dead right now. xD Thanks.

cazzie's avatar

the expression ‘stay suffering’ is far too awkward. it should be something like… ‘This way, he would be relieved of his suffering…...’ yes.. and the ‘with’ is missing.

RandomMrdan's avatar

Yeah, “with” seems to be missing.

troubleinharlem's avatar

@cazzie ; Too true, I’ll add that as a comment on the paper.

JLeslie's avatar

This way he would not have to continue suffering in the world without her – instead, he could be with her, and she with him, forever.”

PandoraBoxx's avatar

This way he would not have to remain in the world, suffering, without her—instead, they could be together, forever.

Jeruba's avatar

I second @PandoraBoxx‘s interpretation. The idea of “remain in the world” seems important—it’s not just “continue.”

The original “he with her and she with him” does add some poetry, though, and that underscored reciprocity is certainly in keeping with the character of the novel under discussion. I’d be inclined to make the least intrusive editorial change and retain both the spirit and the literary flavor of the essayist’s statement:

“This way he would not have to remain suffering in the world without her – instead, he could be with her, and she with him, forever.”

filmfann's avatar

“This way he would not have to stay suffering in the world without her – instead, he could be her, and she with him, forever.”
Makes sense to me in a Tony Perkins/Psycho kinda way.

PacificToast's avatar

“he could be her” Maybe “he could be with her”?

Jeruba's avatar

@PacificToast, did you forget to glance at the thread?

PacificToast's avatar

>.< @Jeruba I was in a hurry. Sorry.

JeffVader's avatar

Perhaps he’s considering cross-dressing as her!

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