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RedDeerGuy1's avatar

Is there a seminary or other route that an atheist can attend to research super spiritual matters?

Asked by RedDeerGuy1 (24336points) February 23rd, 2017

I’m wondering if it would help me. Would it be possible for an atheist to take classes? It’s new for me. I’m curious.

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17 Answers

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

You would be allowed to attend any seminary, but you may find that you don’t bond well with the other seminarians, who would all be believers. You could, instead, attend religion classes at any university or college.

Darth_Algar's avatar

Unless you plan on devoting your life to ministerial practice then there wouldn’t be much point.

RedDeerGuy1's avatar

@Darth_Algar I’m looking to research the super spiritual.

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

What is the super spiritual?

Darth_Algar's avatar

A seminary’s basically just a college for perusing a codified religious vocation. Not sure what you mean by “super spiritual”, but whatever it is you’re looking for I don’t think you’re going to find it at seminary. All you’ll get there is a good training in the doctrine of whatever church controls the seminary.

RedDeerGuy1's avatar

@Hawaii_Jake Astral traveling…miracles, psychic powers , spiritual gifts… ect.

Darth_Algar's avatar

And you’re an atheist?

RedDeerGuy1's avatar

I don’t know. I have an open mind. I’m just trying to make sure Its not too open. I was raised Roman Catholic. Maybe I can take parapsychology or philosophy .

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

They won’t teach about those things at a seminary. I will see what books I can recommend when I get home.

Yellowdog's avatar

Liberal seminaries tend to tend to teach about the stories in scripture and what they mean to the people—along with a heavy dose of textual criticism and analysis, and how to run a church. Biblically conservative seminaries tend to be as described above. Most churches would regard the stuff you are talking about as nonsense

The type of stuff you are seeking—falls in the realm of metaphysics. Try something like Unity School of Christianity or Unity Church of Christianity— its really more like metaphysics and not Biblical orthodoxy. You should also try anything related to Carl Gustav Jung or Joseph Campbell.

Yellowdog's avatar

Another area of study I forgot to mention is Theosophy.

As an atheist, don’t be put off by the “God” language. most of the groups I’ve listed see God as the collective conscious (or collective unconscious)—divine mind, etc. Something within us or human mind collectively. Something in all religion, occult systems, nature

kritiper's avatar

You don’t sound like an Atheist if you’re still seeking answers about that religious stuff. Maybe you’re more of an Agnostic. Whatever the case, you need to come to grips with what you do or don’t believe before thinking about attending a seminary. Read some books. Get more information. You’ll be wasting your time as well as other’s, not to mention making a fool of yourself and wasting money.

Ltryptophan's avatar

@RedDeerGuy1 Have you read Fear and Trembling by Kierkegaard?

LostInParadise's avatar

You might be interested in macrobiotics They mash together belief in God with oriental mysticism and they apply it to eating. I don’t know if they cover astral travel. I think it is all hokum, but don’t go by me. I am a true disbeliever.

zenvelo's avatar

You might do better if you matriculated at John F. Kennedy University, where you can get a Masters of Arts in Consciousness and Transformative Studies.

As in other pursuits, you need to start your academic journey by doing what you need to get accepted at a college or university. To earn a Masters, you need to start with a baccalaureate degree.

RedDeerGuy1's avatar

@Ltryptophan Have you read Fear and Trembling by Kierkegaard? No, but I will check Amazon for a copy. Sorry I took so long to reply. I found a kindle book for $0.99 I will read when I have the time…. I have piles of books to read.

LostInParadise's avatar

You might also want to read Sartre’s Being and Nothingness. Like Kierkegaard, Sartre was an existentialist, but he approached it from an atheistic point of view.

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