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asmonet's avatar

What is it about Root Beer that makes it so much frothier when poured?

Asked by asmonet (21365points) August 19th, 2011

Well, what’s going on in there?

Does it simply have more carbonation?

Is it a reaction with a specific part of the Root Beer formula?

FEED MY CURIOSITY!

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8 Answers

XOIIO's avatar

Carbonation.

asmonet's avatar

@XOIIO I’m aware it’s carbonated – obviously. I’m wondering if it is more carbonated than most sodas or if it’s a property of that particular kind of soda. You haven’t really answered anything.

bkcunningham's avatar

Sassafras roots and bark contain natural foaming agents. Also, additional foaming agents such as yucca or quillaja extracts, are often added to increase root beer’s froth, head or foaminess. Source: http://www.root-beer.org/questions.htm

wundayatta's avatar

So much frothier than what?

As @bkcunningham said, it has to do with ingredients, but it also has to do with how you pour it. It’ll froth more if you pour it straight down to the bottom of the glass. And of course, it froths a lot when you put the ice cream in. I prefer chocolate ice cream. Bring your straw. Such off the froth before it slides down the outside of the glass.

XOIIO's avatar

@asmonet That’s what I meant, it has more carbonation, and it is a thicker liquid. Also what @bkcunningham said.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

Mine has got Vanilla ice cream in the glass and boy does that FOAM !

Moegitto's avatar

It seriously took me 28 years, looking at my family like they were stupid, and 2 stints n the military to learn that ice reduces froth. Ice cream makes soda froth due to the carbon in the soda reacting to the breakdown of the ice cream. I don’t know why I know that before the ice trick. Funnily, I can get way more elaborate in the explaining of ice cream floats.

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