General Question

PupnTaco's avatar

Why was automotive design so much more awesome between 1955 & 1965?

Asked by PupnTaco (13860points) July 7th, 2008

I look at cars now and they’re all so generic. I couldn’t tell a Mercedes from a Honda if it wasn’t for the badging.

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

3 Answers

stevenb's avatar

I think designers wanted to make cool cars that looked cool first, were practical second, and were safe if possible. I think the designs even before 55 were wicked also. 32 ford for example. Now engineers have to work backwards from a wind tunnel and mpg and safety standards and gussy it up if possible. The new mustang and challenger are cool, but I see your point and agree. Most cars now are not even close to being good looking. Too bad. The sad thing is that a 65 mustang with a four barrel carb can get 26 plus mpg and it didnt have all of the amazing modern advancements. Why can’t a modern computer controlled car get twice that? And maybe be half as cool.

Jax's avatar

What stevenb said is very true. Roughly 50 years ago designers didn’t have to worry about rules and standards concerning the environment and the safety of passengers and fellow motorists.

All the materials used were allowed at all times, no matter if the passenger would crack their skull on the dashboard in a minor accident. Oak just looked so suave…
Nowadays everything is plastic and soft.

Remember the Austin from Bond or Austin powers It had wings on the axle, bond used it to take other cars apart. It’s actually part of the car but forbidden by law to drive with them nowadays. So much for your original vintage car…

rwiedeman's avatar

Because that was the rocket age, so all the cars looked like rockets. Today is the iPod age, so all the cars look like pods. :)

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.

This question is in the General Section. Responses must be helpful and on-topic.

Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther