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Dutchess_III's avatar

How do you cook your corn?

Asked by Dutchess_III (42442points) May 5th, 2016

For corn on the cob I add butter, a bit of salt and some onion and wrap each ear in foil and throw it on the grill (or practically in the camp fire itself, if we’re camping.) It is SO good!

How do you cook your corn?

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79 Answers

zenvelo's avatar

I do the same as you, but instead of onion, a put on fresh ground pepper.

My daughter prefers corn on the cob boiled, so when she is home for dinner I’ll cook it that way.

ragingloli's avatar

It, uh, it comes in a tin.
And I just, how to put it, I just pour it into the pot with the soup.

JLeslie's avatar

I shuck the corn if the cob isn’t already naked, and put it in water. Once the water is boiling, I turn it down and simmer it about 10 more minutes. I spin them around a couple of times to make sure all sides cooked evenly. Done.

I put a little salt on mine. My husband eats it with just salt, or he puts our cream in a thin coating and powdered chile piquin. Some people use mayo or a mix of mayo and sour cream instead of straight sour cream. It’s very Mexican.

Dutchess_III's avatar

My daughter puts unshucked corn right on the grill.

dammitjanetfromvegas's avatar

I add a little sugar or lemon juice to a pot of water and bring it to a boil. Once the water is boiling I put the corn in, turn the heat off and cover the pot. I let the corn sit in the pot for ten minutes, then serve.

This is shucked corn of course.

Dutchess_III's avatar

M. Lemon juice sounds good.

I once ate a canned corn dish that had cream cheese in it. It was SO good, but I couldn’t seem to reproduce it at home.

ucme's avatar

We have staff for that

Cruiser's avatar

If it was picked that day….I just eat it raw…yum. Otherwise I soak whole corn cobs in sugar water for an hour and drop the soaking wet cobs on a red hot grill. Cook them on all “4 sides” until slightly charred for 3 minutes max. Pull out the tassels first then peel the skin….slather with butter salt pepper if you choose and narf away.

Love_my_doggie's avatar

I use a vegetable steamer for about 10–15 minutes. The corn stays crisp and sweet, never mushy. I just eat it plain; why sully something so perfect by adding any garnishes?

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

As hominy. It’s the only corn that has any notable nutrition and it’s really good.

jca's avatar

I don’t eat it too often because it’s very sweet and fattening (it’s used to fatten livestock, after all). When I do eat it at home, I shuck it, boil it maybe with a little milk in the water. Then I put it on the plate, cut all the kernels off with a knife (so they don’t get stuck in my teeth), sprinkle on a little salt and that’s it.

I also like cornbread when it’s made right.

Someone I used to work with made something called Corn Crack, which, I think, she got the recipe from Paula Deen. It was cornbread, very moist, with canned corn and/or creamed corn, sour cream, really dense, really sweet.

Dutchess_III's avatar

@jca an ear of corn, by itself, has ~100 calories.. That’s not fattening. Not like, say, a pork chop or hamburger patty or a cookie.

Canned corn has more calories though.

jca's avatar

I just looked at it and a cup of corn has a lot of carbs. 17 grams. That’s a lot, if I’m not mistaken. Whatever. Not going to argue over it.

Dutchess_III's avatar

There isn’t a cup of corn kernels on a cob. Maybe between ¼ and ½ a cup.
Popcorn has, like almost 000 calories in a whole bag.

JLeslie's avatar

Corn is a very starchy (read caloric) vegetable. It’s not that corn is so bad, it’s just that when on the subject of vegetables it has a lot of starch relative to other vegetables, and fewer nutrients than many other vegetables.

CWOTUS's avatar

Frito-Lays™ Fritos®

… or I eat it vicariously, as New York Strip steak.

Dutchess_III's avatar

But it’s GOOD @JLeslie! So yum.

Dutchess_III's avatar

That was an informative link, @dammitjanetfromvegas.

>A lot of people mix up “sweet corn,” the vegetable you buy to eat, and “field corn”—the virtually inedible commodity crop used to make everything from livestock feed to ethanol .

> An ear of corn has about the same number of calories as an apple and less than one-fourth the sugar.

> Antioxidant activity, which helps protect the body from cancer and heart disease, is actually increased when corn is cooked.

>Sweet corn is loaded with lutein and zeaxanthin, two phytochemicals that promote healthy vision. A midsize ear also offers a helpful 3-gram dose of dietary fiber.

Rarebear's avatar

With my laser beam eyes.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Is that how you do steaks too @Rarebear?

Seek's avatar

So, I spent my whole life boiling ears of corn… and then I learned this Really Cool Trick.

Don’t shuck the corn. Soak all your ears of corn for ~20 minutes or so. Get ‘em really wet.

Then chuck them in the microwave. Two at a time, about 3–4 minutes. Let ‘em sit for a bit. Then cut off the stem end, and squeeze the thing out of the husk, silk and all. No effort. Add butter and salt and enjoy.

elbanditoroso's avatar

I don’t. Corn has the nasty habit of making it all the way through my body undigested.

Rarebear's avatar

@Dutchess_III No, I use my breath weapon for steaks.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Oh, that doesn’t surprise me atall @Rarebear.

@elbanditoroso, much of it does, but that isn’t a bad thing at all.

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

@elbanditoroso That’s because humans can’t digest corn.

Dutchess_III's avatar

It’s still good for fiber.

Mimishu1995's avatar

This is always a classic :p You don’t need to use the same seasoning as the photo. Just find some onions and any meat you like, and stir-fry them together with the corn. The thing I like most about it is that it takes very little time to prepare but still manages to leave you full.

Some people here might have already known that I have an addiction to corn soup. But actually I don’t make corn soup from corn. Corn soup requires the corn to be mashed into extremely small pieces and specifically season. I always go with canned corn and corn powder instead of using corn directly.

Cruiser's avatar

@ragingloli what colour is this fibre?

josie's avatar

Exactly the way you do.

jca's avatar

From Livestrong.com:

Starchy Veggies and Weight Control
The USDA dietary guidelines classify corn as a starchy vegetable, which is a group of veggies you should limit to maintain a healthy body weight. One study, published in PLoS Medicine in 2015, looked at the dietary patterns of 133,468 people in the United States and analyzed how eating fruits and vegetables impacted weight gain over a 24-year period. They found that people who ate more starchy veggies were more likely to have gained weight during that time; whereas, people who ate more fiber-rich produce, like berries, were more likely to lose weight.

If you’re overeating starchy veggies to the exclusion of other produce, you might miss out on the benefits of other groups of vegetables. For example, beneficial beta-carotene—a source of vitamin A—found in many red and orange veggies, and the vitamin K and iron found in leafy greens.

USDA ChooseMyPlate guidelines recommend a total of 4 to 6 cups of starchy veggies weekly for a balanced diet, depending on your gender and age. That figure includes your intake of other starchy vegetables—like potatoes and sweet potatoes—not just corn.

Rarebear's avatar

@Dutchess_III fibres are related to tigres.

MilkyWay's avatar

My mum always makes them the typical Indian way.
She peels off the husk just enough so she can put some butter on, and then wraps it up again. She puts them on the grill (or over some hot coals as is the proper way) until cooked. She’ll then remove the husks and put them back on the grill until a bit charred. After that some fresh lemon is squeezed over and some salt and red chilli powder. So delicious!
Always reminds me of the seaside as its traditionally a common seaside delicacy.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Don’t forget about the ligres, @Rarebear. Must never forget about the ligres.

@MilkyWay thank you for that! I’ve always wondered how to get the onions and stuff in the the corn when it has the husk on. But does the butter leak out very bad?

Well, @jca, according to @ARE_you_kidding_me we can’t even digest corn so what does it even matter what the starch content it? Besides, starch has it’s place in our diet. I eat a lot of “starchy” food, like potatoes and breads. I don’t have a weight problem.

jca's avatar

@Dutchess_III: The majority of diets that I know of say avoid corn. That’s all. Not that everyone who eats corn is overweight. Not everyone who eats cake is overweight either. That doesn’t mean we should eat lots of cake.

Dutchess_III's avatar

If they suggest avoiding corn because of the starch, then they need to warn against:
pumpkins
potatoes
peas
parsnip
plantains
just about every kind of bread and cereal. Source

They all have about the same amount of starch, although we need starch, within reason, for the sugar it converts into energy which makes the machine run.

I have no idea what’s out there as far as diets. I don’t diet.

jca's avatar

@Dutchess_III: You’re right, and many diets do tell you to avoid peas, potatoes, plantains, carrots (not on your list), parsnips and stuff like that. Also, as you know (even if you don’t diet) is that most diets DO tell you to limit bread and cereal. I know you don’t diet but many people do, and what the info from the site I quoted said was “The USDA dietary guidelines classify corn as a starchy vegetable, which is a group of veggies you should limit to maintain a healthy body weight.”

Seek's avatar

Funny, because as I was growing up the food pyramid suggested 6–11 servings of grains a day, and 3–5 of protein.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Yep, @Seek. Recommendations change constantly. One minute it’s, “To be healthy eat lots of vegetables!” and the next, “Don’t eat vegetables!”
The next is “Eat whole grains!” The next is “Don’t eat grain!!”
Drink milk, don’t drink milk.
Drink wine, don’t drink wine.
Fat is evil, fat is fine.

That’s why I go with common sense.

jca's avatar

I’m not talking about regular eating, I’m talking dieting. Google it and you’ll see what diets tell you.

Seek's avatar

Well, some diets say to live on lemon water and cayenne pepper for two weeks. That’s hardly good information.

Dutchess_III's avatar

@jca that is why I don’t do diets. Diets are designed to fail. You go “on” a diet, reach the weight you want, then you go “off” the diet and gain it all back.

My regular eating is how I continue to weigh whatever I weigh. It is just the way I eat, every single day. It’s not even a struggle or anything I even have to think about most of the time. And corn is SURE in my regular diet, even if I only eat it 3 or 4 times a year. I love corn.

Dutchess_III's avatar

And oh crap. My husband bought me peanut brittle, thinking he was being nice. I just now remembered. The gals at the utility company will be happy! I gives all my useless calories to them.

Seek's avatar

The American Heart Association’s “No Fad Diet” book (which I have but haven’t read yet, just opened for this question) says specifically to avoid any diet which villifies a certain food group.

It suggests, for a 2000 calorie diet, 6–8 servings per day of whole grains (with rice, pasta and cereal listed as suggestions), and 4–5 servings per week of nuts, seeds, and legumes (dry beans and peas listed)

Dutchess_III's avatar

Sunflower seeds, in the shell, are in my regular diet sometimes too. They are a wonderkind food. Anybody want to discuss sunflower seeds? :D :D :D

Dutchess_III's avatar

@Seek Counting calories keeps you where you want to be, too.

Seek's avatar

@Dutchess_III Yes, that seems to be the backbone of the AHA’s diet. Balanced sources and calories in < Calories out

Dutchess_III's avatar

Educating yourself on calories is really important. With out knowledge people tend to go on assumptions that are often wildly wrong.

My husband, for example, equates calories with amount and that’s SO far off I don’t even know where to start!

Also, for example, for a while he’d taken to getting strawberry banana smoothies at McDonalds. Once he asked if I wanted to taste his.
I said, “Hell no! That’s nothing but sugar and fat!” I just knew it almost instinctively. (Same with lattes, which I avoid.)
He didn’t believe me. It’s strawberries and bananas so it’s healthy, right?
Then I had to go look it up to see if my instincts were right. They were. They add yogurt and sugar. They have about the same calories as their milkshakes.

After a while eating right is just what you do, naturally. Except for peanut brittle. I gotta get that stuff outta here! I LOVE peanut brittle!

dammitjanetfromvegas's avatar

It’s often advised to limit corn in a diet because of the toppings people put on, not the corn specifically.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Sure. But the same can be said for virtually any food, though, like potatoes, which by themselves aren’t fattening. But add butter, sour cream, cheese, or fry them, and there you go.

A green salad salad has virtually no calories. But I put 50 calories of boiled egg (about half an egg) 50 calories of croutons, 50 calories of bacon bits and and probably 400 or more calories in French dressing (You can figure about 100 calories per tablespoon…which is a little high—all of the counts are, but it’s the best way to calculate.) However, I am aware of what I’m doing.

Same for ordering a hamburger and adding cheese and bacon. There’s an extra 200 calories.

Barbque sauce on pork ribs. That adds about 100 calories per tablespoon for the sauce, on the most fattening meat that there is to begin with—pork.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Oh, BTW. That salad ^^^^ is the meal for me. A dinner salad is about half that and I never eat all of a dinner salad. I eat about half.

JLeslie's avatar

No. If you’re counting carbs and calories corn is a high carb veggie. It’s similar to potato.

Here’s a link

It’s not because of the toppings, although that is another thing to think about, it’s because it’s a high starch vegetable.

I’m not lecturing about low starch diets here. I’m not saying you should be eating low starch, I don’t care, I’m just trying to make clear the facts about corn. Diet to lose weight, diet for diabetes, or just your every day “diet” meaning food intake, if you think about carbs at all, corn is up there. It’s not as “bad” as say pasta, but it’s not extremely far off. Probably corm per oz is about ¾ the carbs of potatoes. Maybe it’s a little less.

Dutchess_III's avatar

@JLeslie, a calorie is a unit of energy. An ear of corn has about 100 calories. A mere tablespoon of peanut butter has about 100 calories too. They have the same amount of “energy” in them. The mechanics of why they count as having that many calories or that much energy doesn’t matter. It’s the energy that is produced by those calories, by whatever means, that counts. When you create too much energy the body stores it in the form of fat.
When you eat a lot of calories, especially concentrated high calorie sugars and fats, you created far more energy than your body needs.

The toppings most certainly do count. They are, actually, probably the biggest culprits because people tend to not take them into consideration. Take the salad above. I start with lettuce, add onions, green peppers and mushrooms, baby corn if they have it. Virtually 0 calories. On top of those virtually 0 calories I pile 550 calories or more of other foods / toppings on.
But, if I say “Oh, I had a green salad for lunch,” people are going ”That’s all?”

JLeslie's avatar

I give up. I know what a calorie is. I know you take the grams of carbs or protein and multiple by 4 to get calories. Fat you multiply by 9. So what? I got an A in nutrition, you don’t have to explain the basics to me, not to worry.

My point is only that a lot of people who watch carbs or total calories, and who are talking about vegetables often don’t count corn or potatoes as a vegetable per se, they count it as a starch. When you eat French fries do you count it as a vegetable? Technically a vegetable yes, but do you really see it that way? If you go back to the 4 food groups or the pyramid do you count a potato as a serving of vegetables? Most people don’t. Corn has about the same starch as the potato.

The toppings count, but I’m talking about no toppings. You can also put cheese sauce on broccoli, ranch dressing on lettuce, and butter on green beans. So fucking what? We, @jca and I, are just talking about naked vegetables.

Dutchess_III's avatar

I’m talking about calories, period. It’s much easier to just talk about calories than it is to try and puzzle out the math every time you place a food order.

I didn’t realize you and @jca were the only ones in this conversation. This particular side track started with my response to @dammitjanetfromvegas, who said, hereIt’s often advised to limit corn in a diet because of the toppings people put on, not the corn specifically.” Follow the link and start with my response to her comment. Now, with our comments after that, which @jca didn’t contribute to, how was I to know you two were only talking about veggie porn?

dammitjanetfromvegas's avatar

I shared facts too, just sayin’. I think Dutchess was the only one who bothered to look at my link.

Thanks Dutch! Wanna shuck some corn?

JLeslie's avatar

@Dutchess_III Ok. @Janet too. I’m not trying to exclude anyone. One thing she said was along the lines about limiting corn because of toppings. I’m saying I’m not talking about toppings. If you look at calories in potatoes and corn, they have more calories than many vegetables, because they have more starch.

An avocado has a lot of calories because it’s packed with fat. I’m talking about calories.

Sure, if you only eat a cob of corn it might be the same calories as a whole hell of a bunch of kale. I’m only saying on a plate a cup of corn is like a cup of potatoes. Most people don’t know to think of them the same unless they know. Each has nutrient benefits besides the carbs, that’s good. A cob doesn’t have a cup of corn, so a corn cob is less food then maybe what someone would put on their plate when eating a potato.

I’m not saying corn is bad. I’m saying it’s one of the starchier veggies. That’s it. I’m agreeing with some of what you and @dammitjanet said. I’m just not sure why you don’t agree that corn tends to be one of the veggies with more starch per gram or cup or oz than most. That’s it.

jca's avatar

Nobody says “vilify corn.” I said that the diets mostly say “limit corn.” That’s what @JLeslie is saying . Limit starches.

(the reason I haven’t commented, @Dutchess_III, is that I’ve been in a work meeting all afternoon and then out for dinner and shopping after work. I haven’t been avoiding Fluther. I do other things besides Fluther).

JLeslie's avatar

I eat corn, I just count it as a starch. You’ll see way at the top, I just put a little salt on mine.

When I’m “watching” my diet I count calories. I just count them, I don’t obsess about where the calories come from except to say I try to really limit animal intake, and I like to feel like I’m eating a full plate of food so I like to have plenty of not very caloric food, like a lot of low cal veggies.

Seek's avatar

Corn is a grain, not a vegetable.

Potato is a vegetable, not a grain.

A carb is a carb no matter where it comes from, but we appear to be disagreeing as to whether limiting carbs is necessary to a healthy diet.

JLeslie's avatar

^^Yeah. It can be considered a grain, a vegetable, or even a fruit. Depending on who is classifying it. I don’t care if people put starch in their diet. Just if they want to track carbs, corn is one of the starchier “vegetables.” I’d argue most Americans think of it as a veg on their plate when on the cob, or even not on the cob. I believe they are unlikely to have meat, corn on the cob, and broccoli on one plate. They think of the corn as the veg from the four food group days. Old people like me.

Corn cereal it’s more obviously starchy.

dammitjanetfromvegas's avatar

I’m just trying to say that 3 ears of corn per week is good for you and won’t make you gain weight.

MilkyWay's avatar

@Dutchess_III no worries darling ♡ what you can do is use some thread to tie it into place (unless you’re cooking it inside a fire lol then it would just burn). The amount of butter that leaks depends on how much you use but it should be fine if you close the husks back properly and keep turning the cob every once in a while.

JLeslie's avatar

@dammitjanetfromvegas I’m just saying corn is fine, just have an idea of it’s nutritional properties. I’m fine with people eating corn, just like I’m fine with them eating rice, oatmeal, couscous, and potatoes. It’s a matter of balance. I’m personally not anti-carb. However, a steak and potatoes guy who “tries” to eat “some vegetables, isn’t getting much of anywhere by making his vegetable corn. It will make someone gain weight if they are eating too many calories in general. Not because it’s corn, but because it’s higher calories than a different vegetable option of the same portion.

jca's avatar

I don’t eat it too often because it’s very sweet and fattening” is what I said (up above) which is what seems to have started this debate about corn and whether or not it’s beneficial or not. I know people can eat corn and not gain weight. If people want to lose weight, diets and eating plans and nutritionists will all tell you to limit corn, peas, potatoes, bread, and other starchy foods. That’s not an opinion that is exclusively mine, it’s all google-able. That’s all.

And @Dutchess_III, I don’t use you as an example of being able to eat anything and not gain weight because by your own admission, you eat very little and usually once a day.

I find for myself, the older I get, the harder it is to lose weight. Other people I know say the same thing. @Seek and @dammitjanetfromvegas aren’t there yet. ;)

jca's avatar

Just now on FB, I got this “given” to me. (Not sure if it’s because FB knows I’m trying to work on eating better or if it’s because FB knows I’m getting old. It says that the Mediterranean diet is shown to slow the aging process. I googled Mediterranean diet and it says “4 to 8 servings of day of non starchy vegetables. Non starchy vegetables include all vegetables except corn, peas, potatoes and winter squash.” http://www.uhs.wisc.edu/health-topics/healthy-lifestyle/documents/Mediterranean.pdf

Seek's avatar

If I ate the Mediterranean diet I’d be in complete misery. Way too much oil. I can’t digest it.

Besides, there is fuckloads of starch in that diet. Pasta, rice, bread etc. is the basis. Plus you have all the legumes on top of that – hummus, anyone?

So they don’t eat much potato. The deep fried chickpeas more than make up for that.

jca's avatar

Perhaps you missed my point, @Seek. My point was that it’s another eating plan/diet that advocates for limiting corn and specifies that it’s a starchy vegetable.

Seek's avatar

You’re right. I’m completely missing the point.

Why is this conversation happening?

Dutchess_III's avatar

I didn’t read where any one said I can eat anything I want and not gain weight @jca. That used to be true, eons ago, but not in the last 30 years, when I started monitoring what I eat, to the point I rarely have to think about it (unless Rick brings peanut brittle into the house!!)

As @dammitjanetfromvegas said corn is a grain, like cereal or rice, not a vegetable.

You aren’t missing the point @Seek. People are going around in circles trying to explain themselves and making things far more complicated than they have to be.

Corn on the cob is about 100 calories, by itself which is not that much in the course of an entire meal. Put butter on it, and now it’s 200 calories. It’s that simple.

Unless, of course, it can’t be digested as @ARE_you_kidding_me claims, in which case corn has 0 calories. I know that much of it does pass through untouched. But some of it is harvested for the body to use as energy, but at the least you can lower the calorie count.

Seek's avatar

We can digest the sugar, just not the insoluble fiber parts. Insoluble fiber is an important part of one’s diet. Corn just happens to have a good amount of it.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Right. All grains do to a certain extent. This link discusses most of what we’ve been talking about. It says, among other things, ”....insoluble fiber has been shown in research to help feed the “good” bacteria in our gut

I think, perhaps, people are confusing nutrition with calories. The sugar the body creates from carbs gives us energy. It’s fuel for the machine.

The nutrition does other things. For example, ”Corn contains certain B vitamins and vitamin C, as well as magnesium and potassium. Yellow corn is also a good source of two antioxidants, zeaxanthin and lutein, which are good for eye health, ”

dammitjanetfromvegas's avatar

Oh, I’m there @jca. I’m 45 and it’s not as easy for me to maintain the weight I want to be at, but a few ears of corn per week during the summer doesn’t hurt me or add to my waistline.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Exactly. No more than a bagel or a bowl of Wheat Chex.

MollyMcGuire's avatar

I either boil it or cut it off of the cob and cook it a few minutes, drain, add salt/pepper/butter. I have also wrapped it in foil and put on the grill.

I like to cook it in the husk as well. We haven’t done it in a while but we used to line the side of a huge restaurant size pot with standing corn (not shucked or cleaned), sitting the stalk end on the bottom of the pot. Then we fill the middle with whole veggies and sausages, add about an inch of water, cover and simmer for about four hours. We call it a corn boil and it’s great for feeding a crowd. In college we would put it on the stove and leave for ballgames. When we got home dinner was served.

Dutchess_III's avatar

I ate tomato soup and mashed potatoes in college. And pop corn.

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

A little corny vut a vinteresting read muahaha

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